ANGER POEMS

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My Dream

So many times I thought about yesterday
A day that I was innocent in every way
When I was just a little girl who was playing all day
And just cried when someone ruined my day.
.....

Ma. Cristina Colima
My Horse

How sluggishly do I walk
On the way to meet my friend
I am coming to my life's end
Far away i am from my friend
.....

Mohammad Younus
With You In My Life

My Life was a book of empty pages,
Some shredded in rages,
Others crayoned in black,
Proof how my life was a wreck.
.....

Salma Hatim
Early Sunset

If the sun sets for me at dawn
So that the white in me turns black
Before I shed off a single milk teeth
If I vacate that soothsome seat
.....

Michael Aete
I'm Full Of Anger And Hate

I'm full of anger and hate
Something I never knew could define me
I'm full of anger and hate
Something I never thought I would have
.....

Murangi Netshisaulu
Feelings And The Mind

We met once and I didn't fall in deep
Not because you were not my type
But I didn't want to make you cheap

.....

Bright Madziva
Drought!

Yet I remember you!
And Your piercing words,
Words that shake my soul,
Words that Disintegrate my being,
.....

Faizi
The Boy With The Sun In His Pocket

You may be if you laugh at yourself
accept the sky has its own significance
and is not waiting for your interpretation
and metaphor.
.....

S. K. Kelen
The Secret People

Smile at us, pay us, pass us; but do not quite forget.
For we are the people of England, that never have spoken yet.
There is many a fat farmer that drinks less cheerfully,
There is many a free French peasant who is richer and sadder than we.
.....

G. K. Chesterton
Lepanto

White founts falling in the courts of the sun,
And the Soldan of Byzantium is smiling as they run;
There is laughter like the fountains in that face of all men feared,
It stirs the forest darkness, the darkness of his beard,
.....

G. K. Chesterton
Gone But No Forgotten

Death is not a Gift,
Death is not an Award,
Nor a Degree or an Achivement,
But a Natural Phenomenon.
.....

Lebe Paul
Walt Whitman

I

I CELEBRATE myself;
And what I assume you shall assume;
.....

Walt Whitman
Ann Arbor Variations

1
Wet heat drifts through the afternoon
like a campus dog, a fraternity ghost
waiting to stay home from football games.
.....

Frank O'hara
This Heritage To The Race Of Kings

This heritage to the race of kings,
Their children and their children's seed
Have wrought their prophecies in deed
Of terrible and splendid things.
.....

Joseph Plunkett
To A Young Poet Who Killed Himself

When you had played with life a space
And made it drink and lust and sing,
You flung it back into God's face
And thought you did a noble thing.
.....

Joyce Kilmer
September 1, 1939

I sit in one of the dives
On Fifty-second Street
Uncertain and afraid
As the clever hopes expire
.....

W. H. Auden
Ode On A Distant Prospect Of Eton College

Ye distant spires, ye antique towers,
That crown the watery glade,
Where grateful Science still adores
Her Henry's holy shade;
.....

Thomas Gray
Endymion: Book I

ENDYMION.

A Poetic Romance.

.....

John Keats
Ode On Melancholy

No, no, go not to Lethe, neither twist
Wolf's-bane, tight-rooted, for its poisonous wine;
Nor suffer thy pale forehead to be kiss'd
By nightshade, ruby grape of Proserpine;
.....

John Keats
The Eve Of St. Agnes

St. Agnes' Eve-Ah, bitter chill it was!
The owl, for all his feathers, was a-cold;
The hare limp'd trembling through the frozen grass,
And silent was the flock in woolly fold:
.....

John Keats
Sonnet 050: How Heavy Do I Journey On The Way

How heavy do I journey on the way,
When what I seek, my weary travel's end,
Doth teach that case and that repose to say,
“Thus far the miles are measured from thy friend!”
.....

William Shakespeare
Venus And Adonis

Even as the sun with purple-coloured face
Had ta'en his last leave of the weeping morn,
Rose-cheeked Adonis hied him to the chase;
Hunting he loved, but love he laughed to scorn.
.....

William Shakespeare
Crossing Brooklyn Ferry

1
Flood-Tide below me! I see you face to face!
Clouds of the west-sun there half an hour high-I see you also face
to face.
.....

Walt Whitman
Song Of Myself

1
I celebrate myself, and sing myself,
And what I assume you shall assume,
For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.
.....

Walt Whitman
Elegiac Stanzas Suggested By A Picture Of Peele Castle In A Storm, Painted By Sir George Beaumont

I was thy neighbour once, thou rugged Pile!
Four summer weeks I dwelt in sight of thee:
I saw thee every day; and all the while
Thy Form was sleeping on a glassy sea.
.....

William Wordsworth
The Old Cumberland Beggar

I saw an aged Beggar in my walk;
And he was seated, by the highway side,
On a low structure of rude masonry
Built at the foot of a huge hill, that they
.....

William Wordsworth
Lament Of The Frontier Guard

By the North Gate, the wind blows full of sand,
Lonely from the beginning of time until now!
Trees fall, the grass goes yellow with autumn.
I climb the towers and towers
.....

Ezra Pound
A Hymn To Christ At The Author’s Last Going Into Germany

In what torn ship soever I embark,
That ship shall be my emblem of thy Ark;
What sea soever swallow me, that flood
Shall be to me an emblem of thy blood;
.....

John Donne
Confined Love

Some man unworthy to be possessor
Of old or new love, himself being false or weak,
Thought his pain and shame would be lesser
If on womankind he might his anger wreak,
.....

John Donne
Anthem For Doomed Youth

What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?
Only the monstrous anger of the guns.
Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle
Can patter out their hasty orisons.
.....

Wilfred Owen
The Female Of The Species

When the Himalayan peasant meets the he-bear in his pride,
He shouts to scare the monster, who will often turn aside.
But the she-bear thus accosted rends the peasant tooth and nail.
For the female of the species is more deadly than the male.
.....

Rudyard Kipling
King And No King

‘Would it were anything but merely voice!'
The No King cried who after that was King,
Because he had not heard of anything
That balanced with a word is more than noise;
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Three Beggars

‘Though to my feathers in the wet,
I have stood here from break of day.
I have not found a thing to eat,
For only rubbish comes my way.
.....

William Butler Yeats
Amantium Irae

When this, our rose, is faded,
And these, our days, are done,
In lands profoundly shaded
From tempest and from sun;
.....

Ernest Dowson
Impenitentia Ultima

Before my light goes out for ever if God should
give me a choice of graces,
I would not reck of length of days, nor crave
for things to be;
.....

Ernest Dowson
The Sea-change

Where river and ocean meet in a great tempestuous
frown,
Beyond the bar, where on the dunes the white-
capped rollers break;
.....

Ernest Dowson
You Would Have Understood Me, Had You Waited

Ah, dans ces mornes sèjours
Les jamais sont les toujours
Paul Verlaine

.....

Ernest Dowson
Ode To Liberty

STROPHE

Who shall awake the Spartan fife,
And call in solemn sounds to life
.....

William Collins
The Passions

An Ode for Music

When Music, heavenly maid, was young,
While yet in early Greece she sung,
.....

William Collins
A Song For Saint Cecilia’s Day, 1687

From Harmony, from heavenly Harmony
This universal frame began:
When nature underneath a heap
Of jarring atoms lay
.....

John Dryden
Interrupt This Program (liberty Lotus)

Of badly behaved humans and pallid dust-
Split screen shows tall buildings in New York
Make good targets for aeroplanes
And the Pentagon burns like any other place.
.....

S. K. Kelen
An Essay On Criticism

'Tis hard to say, if greater Want of Skill
Appear in Writing or in Judging ill,
But, of the two, less dang'rous is th' Offence,
To tire our Patience, than mis-lead our Sense:
.....

Alexander Pope
Mine Enemy Is Growing Old—

1509

Mine Enemy is growing old-
I have at last Revenge-
.....

Emily Dickinson
A Character

How often do I wish I were
What people call a character;
A ripe and cherubic old chappie
Who lives to make his fellows happy;
.....

Robert Service
I Will Not Fight

I will not fight: though proud of pith
I hold no one worth striving with;
And should resentment burn my breast
I deem that silence serves me best:
.....

Robert Service
Mc’clusky’s Nell

In Mike Maloney's Nugget bar the hooch was flowin' free,
An' One-eyed Mike was shakin' dice wi' Montreal Maree,
An roarin' rageful warning when the boys got overwild,
When peekin' through the double door he spied a tiny child.
.....

Robert Service
The Ballad Of How Macpherson Held The Floor

Said President MacConnachie to Treasurer MacCall:
“We ought to have a piper for our next Saint Andrew's Ball.
Yon squakin' saxophone gives me the syncopated gripes.
I'm sick of jazz, I want to hear the skirling of the pipes.”
.....

Robert Service
Tam Glen

My heart is a-breaking, dear Tittie,
Some counsel unto me come len';
To anger them a' is a pity,
But what will I do wi' Tam Glen?
.....

Robert Burns
The Holy Fair

A note of seeming truth and trust
Hid crafty observation;
And secret hung, with poison'd crust,
The dirk of defamation:
.....

Robert Burns
Blight

Give me truths,
For I am weary of the surfaces,
And die of inanition. If I knew
Only the herbs and simples of the wood,
.....

Ralph Waldo Emerson
The Iliad: Book 01

Sing, O goddess, the anger of Achilles son of Peleus, that brought
countless ills upon the Achaeans. Many a brave soul did it send
hurrying down to Hades, and many a hero did it yield a prey to dogs
and vultures, for so were the counsels of Jove fulfilled from the
.....

Homer
The Iliad: Book 10

Now the other princes of the Achaeans slept soundly the whole
night through, but Agamemnon son of Atreus was troubled, so that he
could get no rest. As when fair Juno's lord flashes his lightning in
token of great rain or hail or snow when the snow-flakes whiten the
.....

Homer
The Iliad: Book 12

So the son of Menoetius was attending to the hurt of Eurypylus
within the tent, but the Argives and Trojans still fought desperately,
nor were the trench and the high wall above it, to keep the Trojans in
check longer. They had built it to protect their ships, and had dug
.....

Homer
The Iliad: Book 13

Now when Jove had thus brought Hector and the Trojans to the
ships, he left them to their never-ending toil, and turned his keen
eyes away, looking elsewhither towards the horse-breeders of Thrace,
the Mysians, fighters at close quarters, the noble Hippemolgi, who
.....

Homer
The Iliad: Book 14

Nestor was sitting over his wine, but the cry of battle did not
escape him, and he said to the son of Aesculapius, “What, noble
Machaon, is the meaning of all this? The shouts of men fighting by our
ships grow stronger and stronger; stay here, therefore, and sit over
.....

Homer
The Iliad: Book 15

But when their flight had taken them past the trench and the set
stakes, and many had fallen by the hands of the Danaans, the Trojans
made a halt on reaching their chariots, routed and pale with fear.
Jove now woke on the crests of Ida, where he was lying with
.....

Homer
The Iliad: Book 16

Thus did they fight about the ship of Protesilaus. Then Patroclus
drew near to Achilles with tears welling from his eyes, as from some
spring whose crystal stream falls over the ledges of a high precipice.
When Achilles saw him thus weeping he was sorry for him and said,
.....

Homer
The Iliad: Book 17

Brave Menelaus son of Atreus now came to know that Patroclus had
fallen, and made his way through the front ranks clad in full armour
to bestride him. As a cow stands lowing over her first calf, even so
did yellow-haired Menelaus bestride Patroclus. He held his round
.....

Homer
The Iliad: Book 18

Thus then did they fight as it were a flaming fire. Meanwhile the
fleet runner Antilochus, who had been sent as messenger, reached
Achilles, and found him sitting by his tall ships and boding that
which was indeed too surely true. “Alas,” said he to himself in the
.....

Homer
The Iliad: Book 19

Now when Dawn in robe of saffron was hasting from the streams of
Oceanus, to bring light to mortals and immortals, Thetis reached the
ships with the armour that the god had given her. She found her son
fallen about the body of Patroclus and weeping bitterly. Many also
.....

Homer