Who is Richard Harris Barham

Richard Harris Barham (6 December 1788 – 17 June 1845) was an English cleric of the Church of England, a novelist and a humorous poet. He was known generally by his pseudonym Thomas Ingoldsby and as the author of The Ingoldsby Legends.

Life Richard Harris Barham was born in Canterbury. When he was seven years old his father died, leaving him a small estate, part of which was the manor of Tappington, in Denton, Kent, mentioned so frequently in his later publication The Ingoldsby Legends. At the age of nine he was sent to St Paul's School, but his studies were interrupted by an accident which partially crippled his arm for life. Thus deprived of the power of vigorous bodily activity, he became a great reader and diligent student.

During 1807 he en...
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Great 21 Never 19 Head 19 Time 18 Door 17 Good 17 Long 15 Place 15 Poor 15 Lady 14


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  • Findhaunts: ghosts, like ladies, never speak till spoke to. ~richard harris barham
  • Kingdheeru25: deserving winner pratik ghosts, like ladies, never speak till spoke to. - richard harris barham
  • Kingdheeru25: deserving winner pratik ghosts, like ladies, never speak till spoke to. - richard harris barham
  • Arifjamallodhi: with a satisfied look, as if he would say, “we two are the greatest folks here to-day!” and the priests, with awe, as such freaks they saw, said, “the devil must be in that little jackdaw!” (the jackdaw of rheims) richard harris barham (1788–1845)
  • Gdmaherauthor: as i practice my narration, i'm continuing with some classic works, such as fragment by richard harris barham. it was a very different way of writing. poetic. confusing. fifty words when one will do! love it! what are you reading this week?
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Poem of the day

Sidney Lanier Poem
Tyranny.
 by Sidney Lanier

'Spring-germs, spring-germs,
I charge you by your life, go back to death.
This glebe is sick, this wind is foul of breath.
Stay: feed the worms.

'Oh! every clod
Is faint, and falters from the war of growth
And crumbles in a dreary dust of sloth,
...

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