STOLEN POEMS

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What Is Love

The funny humanity of today breaks hearts
All we want is to be seen in the internet
All she wants is to wear an expensive ring
My heart is pure yet she forgets that
.....
Ibthlhal Abdul

Ibthlhal Abdul
Lost Smiles

Walking miles and miles,
In search of lost smiles.
I wonder where it's gone,
Or someone has stolen it leaving me alone.
.....
Shalu Yadav

Shalu Yadav
Raped Future

I see a dysfunctional future
Wailing in hunger. Many tongues scrabbling for a single bone
Living corpses pile the street.
I hear soothsayers boast in their ignorance and claim a stolen future
.....
Gerald Onyebuchi

Gerald Onyebuchi
Love Yourself

A beautiful day can summarise you.
A beautiful thought can make you stolen,
Be aware with whom your company is,
Otherwise will remain broken..!
.....
K Pratibha

K Pratibha
Childhood

Childhood is a gift
With full of surprises
It is a energy of life
No, rules of life
.....
Shabana Banu

Shabana Banu
Remembrances

Summer pleasures they are gone like to visions every one
And the cloudy days of autumn and of winter cometh on
I tried to call them back but unbidden they are gone
Far away from heart and eye and for ever far away
.....
John Clare

John Clare
A Befitting Send-off

Brothers, carry out the autopsy gently
That corpse was a rich man's residence
The carcass was never an ordinary body
To be hacked and dug upon
.....
Michael Aete

Michael Aete
Mazelli: Canto Iii

I.

With plumes to which the dewdrops cling,
Wide waves the morn her golden wing;
.....

George W. Sands
I Got You In My Life

I have got you by great luck,
I have stolen you,
From the lines of destiny,
My breath is governed by your love,
.....
Pallavi Deepchand

Pallavi Deepchand
Cassandra

I

Captive on a foreign shore,
Far from Ilion's hoary wave,
.....
George Meredith

George Meredith
The Iliad: Book 03

When the companies were thus arrayed, each under its own captain,
the Trojans advanced as a flight of wild fowl or cranes that scream
overhead when rain and winter drive them over the flowing waters of
Oceanus to bring death and destruction on the Pygmies, and they
.....

Homer
In The Droving Days

"Only a pound," said the auctioneer,
"Only a pound; and I'm standing here
Selling this animal, gain or loss --
Only a pound for the drover's horse?
.....

Banjo Paterson
The Wizard Way

[Dedicated to General J.C.F. Fuller]

Velvet soft the night-star glowed
Over the untrodden road,
.....
Aleister Crowley

Aleister Crowley
Cassandra

Mirth the halls of Troy was filling,
Ere its lofty ramparts fell;
From the golden lute so thrilling
Hymns of joy were heard to swell.
.....

Friedrich Schiller
Endymion: Book Iv

Muse of my native land! loftiest Muse!
O first-born on the mountains! by the hues
Of heaven on the spiritual air begot:
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot,
.....
John Keats

John Keats
The Secret Rose

Far-off, most secret, and inviolate Rose,
Enfold me in my hour of hours; where those
Who sought thee in the Holy Sepulchre,
Or in the wine-vat, dwell beyond the stir
.....
William Butler Yeats

William Butler Yeats
The Pied Piper Of Hamelin

A Child's Story

Hamelin Town's in Brunswick,
By famous Hanover city;
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Arithmetic On The Frontier

A great and glorious thing it is
To learn, for seven years or so,
The Lord knows what of that and this,
Ere reckoned fit to face the foe --
.....
Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
Fingal - Book Iii

ARGUMENT.

Cuthullin, pleased with the story of Carril, insists with that bard for more of his songs. He relates the actions of Fingal in Lochlin, and death of Agandecca, the beautiful sister of Swaran. He had scarce finished, when Calmar, the son of Matha, who had advised the first battle, came wounded from the field, and told them of Swaran's design to surprise the remains of the Irish army. He himself proposes to withstand singly the whole force of the enemy, in a narrow pass, till the Irish should make good their retreat. Cuthullin, touched with the gallant proposal of Calmar, resolves to accompany him and orders Carril to carry off the few that remained of the Irish. Morning comes, Calmar dies of his wounds; and the ships of the Caledonians appearing, Swaran gives over the pursuit of the Irish, and returns to oppose Fingal's landing. Cuthullin, ashamed, after his defeat, to appear before Fingal re tires to the cave of Tura. Fingal engages the enemy, puts them to flight: but the coming on of night makes the victory not decisive. The king, who had observed the gallant behavior of his grandson Oscar, gives him advice concerning his conduct in peace and war. He recommends to him to place the example of his fathers before his eyes, as the best model for his conduct; which introduces the episode concerning Fainasóllis, the daughter of the king of Craca, whom Fingal had taken under his protection in his youth. Fillan and Oscar are despatched to observe the motions of the enemy by night: Gaul, the son of Morni, desires the command of the army in the next battle, which Fingal promises to give him. Some general reflections of the poet close the third day.

.....

James Macpherson
Captain Dobbin

CAPTAIN Dobbin, having retired from the South Seas
In the dumb tides of , with a handful of shells,
A few poisoned arrows, a cask of pearls,
And five thousand pounds in the colonial funds,
.....

Kenneth Slessor
My Bees: An Allegory

"O bees, sweet bees!" I said, "that nearest field
Is shining white with fragrant immortelles.
Fly swiftly there and drain those honey wells."
Then, spicy pines the sunny hive to shield,
.....
Helen Hunt Jackson

Helen Hunt Jackson
The Truants

Ere my heart beats too coldly and faintly
To remember sad things, yet be gay,
I would sing a brief song of the world's little children
Magic hath stolen away.
.....

Walter De La Mare
The Shooting Of Dan Mcgrew

A bunch of the boys were whooping it up in the Malamute saloon;
The kid that handles the music-box was hitting a jag-time tune;
Back of the bar, in a solo game, sat Dangerous Dan McGrew,
And watching his luck was his light-o'-love, the lady that's known as Lou.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
For The King

Northern Mexico, 1640


As you look from the plaza at Leon west
.....
Bret Harte

Bret Harte
The Nights Remember

The days remember and the nights remember
The kingly hours that once you made so great,
Deep in my heart they lie, hidden in their splendor,
Buried like sovereigns in their robes of state.
.....

Sara Teasdale
Admetus

To my friend, Ralph Waldo Emerson.


He who could beard the lion in his lair,
.....
Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus
The Princes' Quest - Part The Fifth

So, being risen, the Prince in brief while went
Forth to the market-place, where babblement
Of them that bought and them that sold was one
Of many sounds in murmurous union-
.....

William Watson
Song (breeze Of The Night In Gentler Sighs)

Breeze of the night in gentler sighs
More softly murmur o'er the pillow;
For Slumber seals my Fanny's eyes,
And Peace must never shun her pillow.
.....
George Gordon Lord Byron

George Gordon Lord Byron
Disobedience

James James
Morrison Morrison
Weatherby George Dupree
Took great
.....

Alan Alexander Milne
Going East

She came from the East a fair, young bride,
With a light and a bounding heart,
To find in the distant West a home
With her husband to make a start.
.....

Frances E. W. Harper
Goody Two-shoes.

Versified by Mrs. Clara Doty Bates.


Two-Shoes, Two-Shoes,
.....

Clara Doty Bates
The Shepherd's Calendar - June

Now summer is in flower and natures hum
Is never silent round her sultry bloom
Insects as small as dust are never done
Wi' glittering dance and reeling in the sun
.....
John Clare

John Clare
On The Train

I

THE lady in front of me in the car,
With little red coils close over her ears,
.....
Harriet Monroe

Harriet Monroe
A Final Note

There is a deliberate pleasure in watching
someone smoke cigarettes. Even the echo
of that sentence smells like a stolen observation
that the smoker is deeply, darkly thinking.
.....

Amy King
Samuel Pepys

Like as the Oak whose roots descend
Through earth and stillness seeking food
Most apt to furnish in the end
That dense, indomitable wood
.....
Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
Elegy On Partridge

Well; 'tis as Bickerstaff has guess'd,
Though we all took it for a jest:
Partridge is dead; nay more, he died
Ere he could prove the good 'squire lied.
.....
Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift
Garadh

FOR the poor body that I own
I could weep many a tear:
The days have stolen flesh and bone,
And left a changeling here.
.....
Padraic Colum

Padraic Colum
The Tramp

He eats (a moment's stoppage to his song)
The stolen turnip as he goes along;
And hops along and heeds with careless eye
The passing crowded stage coach reeling bye.
.....
John Clare

John Clare
Antiphon

Daylight fades away.
Is the Lord at hand
In the shadows gray
Stealing on the land?
.....
George Macdonald

George Macdonald
The Stolen Child

Where dips the rocky highland
Of Sleuth Wood in the lake,
There lies a leafy island
Where flapping herons wake
.....
William Butler Yeats

William Butler Yeats
The Lady Of La Garaye - Prologue

RUINS! A charm is in the word:
It makes us smile, it makes us sigh,
'Tis like the note of some spring bird
Recalling other Springs gone by,
.....
Caroline Elizabeth Sarah Norton

Caroline Elizabeth Sarah Norton
The Cattle Thief

They were coming across the prairie, they were
galloping hard and fast;
For the eyes of those desperate riders had sighted
their man at last--
.....

Emily Pauline Johnson
Vignettes 10: All' Amica

And didst thou think that worldly art
Would mould anew this shrinking heart?
No! as a bird, by storms opprest,
Is sheltered in its silent nest,
.....
Matilda Betham

Matilda Betham
Damages, Two Hundred Pounds

Special Jurymen of England! who admire your country's laws,
And proclaim a British Jury worthy of the realm's applause;
Gayly compliment each other at the issue of a cause
Which was tried at Guildford 'sizes, this day week as ever was.
.....
William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray
Song Of Fairies Robbing An Orchard

We, the Fairies, blithe and antic,
Of dimensions not gigantic,
Though the moonshine mostly keep us,
Oft in orchards frisk and peep us.
.....
James Henry Leigh Hunt

James Henry Leigh Hunt
Sleep-stealer

Who stole sleep from baby's eyes? I must know.
Clasping her pitcher to her waist mother went to fetch water
from the village near by.
It was noon. The children's playtime was over; the ducks in
.....

Rabindranath Tagore
The Curse Of The Charter-breakers

IN Westminster's royal halls,
Robed in their pontificals,
England's ancient prelates stood
For the people's right and good.
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
An Inventor

Not yet!

I thought this time 'twas done at last,
the workings perfected, the life in it;
.....

Augusta Davies Webster
The Iliad: Book 3

When the companies were thus arrayed, each under its own captain,
the Trojans advanced as a flight of wild fowl or cranes that scream
overhead when rain and winter drive them over the flowing waters of
Oceanus to bring death and destruction on the Pygmies, and they
.....

Homer
Maying; Or, A Love Of Flowers

Upon a day, a merry day,
When summer in her best,
Like Sunday belles, prepares for play,
And joins each merry guest,
.....
John Clare

John Clare