SPEED POEMS

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My Horse

How sluggishly do I walk
On the way to meet my friend
I am coming to my life's end
Far away i am from my friend
.....
Mohammad Younus

Mohammad Younus
Interim

The room is full of you!-As I came in
And closed the door behind me, all at once
A something in the air, intangible,
Yet stiff with meaning, struck my senses sick!-
.....
Edna St. Vincent Millay

Edna St. Vincent Millay
The Cuckoo-clock

Wouldst thou be taught, when sleep has taken flight,
By a sure voice that can most sweetly tell,
How far off yet a glimpse of morning light,
And if to lure the truant back be well,
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Address To The Devil

O Prince, O chief of many throned pow'rs!
That led th' embattled seraphim to war!
(Milton, Paradise Lost)

.....
Robert Burns

Robert Burns
A Dedication

My new-cut ashlar takes the light
Where crimson-blank the windows flare;
By my own work, before the night,
Great Overseer, I make my prayer.
.....
Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
Sonnet 050: How Heavy Do I Journey On The Way

How heavy do I journey on the way,
When what I seek, my weary travel's end,
Doth teach that case and that repose to say,
“Thus far the miles are measured from thy friend!”
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
I Don't Want You To Read My Poems And Remain The Same

I don't want you to read my poems and remain the same,
i want you to read my poems and get rabbies,
attacking every jack and jill smoking cannabis
i want you to read my poems and wonder if Charles Darwin's theory of evolution was true,
.....
Francis Ngwenya

Francis Ngwenya
Where Lies The Truth? Has Man, In Wisdom's Creed

Where lies the truth? has Man, in wisdom's creed,
A pitiable doom; for respite brief
A care more anxious, or a heavier grief?
Is he ungrateful, and doth little heed
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Master Speed

No speed of wind or water rushing by
But you have speed far greater. You can climb
Back up a stream of radiance to the sky,
And back through history up the stream of time.
.....
Robert Frost

Robert Frost
Any Wife To Any Husband

I

My love, this is the bitterest, that thou
Who art all truth and who dost love me now
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Power Of Words

Words are very powerful that
It cut deeper than a swords,
The cuts of words are irreparable and,
The blow with swords can be cured.
.....
Norbu Dorji

Norbu Dorji
Elegy Xix. - Written In Spring, 1743

Again the labouring hind inverts the soil;
Again the merchant ploughs the tumid wave;
Another spring renews the soldier's toil,
And finds me vacant in the rural cave.
.....

William Shenstone
On Time

Fly envious Time, till thou run out thy race,
Call on the lazy leaden-stepping hours,
Whose speed is but the heavy Plummets pace;
And glut thy self with what thy womb devours,
.....
John Milton

John Milton
The Roll Of The Kettledrum; Or, The Lay Of The Last Charger

“You have the Pyrrhic dance as yet,
Where is the Pyrrhic phalanx gone?
Of two such lessons, why forget
The nobler and the manlier one?”-Byron.
.....
Adam Lindsay Gordon

Adam Lindsay Gordon
Madness

What darkens, what darkens?-'t is heaven's high roof:
What lightens?-'t is Heckla's flame, shooting aloof:
The proud, the majestic, the rugged old Thor,
The mightiest giant the North ever saw,
.....
George Borrow

George Borrow
Endymion: Book I

ENDYMION.

A Poetic Romance.

.....
John Keats

John Keats
The Dove

In Virgil's Sacred Verse we find,
That Passion can depress or raise
The Heav'nly, as the Human Mind:
Who dare deny what Virgil says?
.....
Matthew Prior

Matthew Prior
Corydon

A PASTORAL

SCENE: A roadside in Arcady

.....
Thomas Bailey Aldrich

Thomas Bailey Aldrich
The Conclusion

Sleep not too much; nor longer than asleep
Within thy bed thy lazy body keep;
For when thou, warm awake, shall feel it soft,
Fond cogitations will assail thee oft:
.....
Francis Beaumont

Francis Beaumont
Mary

I.

Who is she, the poor Maniac, whose wildly-fix'd eyes
Seem a heart overcharged to express?
.....
Robert Southey

Robert Southey
Trance

Guardian,but no words
to squat in, the forbidden
linen to the Tabernacle
rented apart, wow.
.....
Michael  Ejikeme

Michael Ejikeme
Of Child With Bird At The Bush

My little bird, how canst thou sit
And sing amidst so many thorns?
Let me a hold upon thee get,
My love with honour thee adorns.
.....
John Bunyan

John Bunyan
The Dance Of Death

THE warder looks down at the mid hour of night,
On the tombs that lie scatter'd below:
The moon fills the place with her silvery light,
And the churchyard like day seems to glow.
.....

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
A Tryst

From out the desolation of the North
An iceberg took it away,
From its detaining comrades breaking forth,
And traveling night and day.
.....
Celia Thaxter

Celia Thaxter
Afar In The Desert

Afar in the Desert I love to ride,
With the silent Bush-boy alone by my side:
When the sorrows of life the soul o'ercast,
And, sick of the Present, I cling to the Past;
.....

Thomas Pringle
The Princess Betrothed To The King Of Garba

WHAT various ways in which a thing is told
Some truth abuse, while others fiction hold;
In stories we invention may admit;
But diff'rent 'tis with what historick writ;
.....

Jean De La Fontaine
In The Droving Days

"Only a pound," said the auctioneer,
"Only a pound; and I'm standing here
Selling this animal, gain or loss --
Only a pound for the drover's horse?
.....

Banjo Paterson
The Iliad: Book 03

When the companies were thus arrayed, each under its own captain,
the Trojans advanced as a flight of wild fowl or cranes that scream
overhead when rain and winter drive them over the flowing waters of
Oceanus to bring death and destruction on the Pygmies, and they
.....

Homer
Hyla Brook

By June our brook's run out of song and speed.
Sought for much after that, it will be found
Either to have gone groping underground
(And taken with it all the Hyla breed
.....
Robert Frost

Robert Frost
The Moving Of The Shades

The black revolving depths have moved and stirred
with news. their Lord has cried. 'Send these, and these.'
Swift feet awake. Shapes speed. The dreadful word
resounds along the tunnels of the seas.
.....

Leon Gellert
The Change

POOR River, now thou'rt almost dry,
What Nymph, or Swain, will near thee lie?
Since brought, alas! to sad Decay,
What Flocks, or Herds, will near thee stay?
.....

Anne Kingsmill Finch
King Henry Vii And The Shipwrights

Harry, our King in England, from London town is gone,
And comen to Hamull on the Hoke in the Countie of Suthampton.
For there lay the Mary of the Tower, his ship of war so strong,
And he would discover, certaynely, if his shipwrights did him wrong.
.....
Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
Sonnets To The Sundry Notes Of Music

I.
IT was a lording's daughter, the fairest one of three,
That liked of her master as well as well might be,
Till looking on an Englishman, the fair'st that eye could see,
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
The Centaurs

Up came the young Centaur-colts from the plains they were
fathered in--
Curious, awkward, afraid.
Burrs on their hocks and their tails, they were branded and gathered in
.....
Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
The Surfer

He thrust his joy against the weight of the sea;
climbed through, slid under those long banks of
foam--
(hawthorn hedges in spring, thorns in the face stinging).
.....

Judith Wright
Endymion: Book Iv

Muse of my native land! loftiest Muse!
O first-born on the mountains! by the hues
Of heaven on the spiritual air begot:
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot,
.....
John Keats

John Keats
The Fickle Breeze

Sighing softly to the river
Comes the loving breeze,
Setting nature all a-quiver,
Rustling through the trees!
.....

William Schwenck Gilbert
The Fudge Family In Paris Letter Xi. From Phelim Connor To ----.

Yes, 'twas a cause, as noble and as great
As ever hero died to vindicate--
A Nation's right to speak a Nation's voice,
And own no power but of the Nation's choice!
.....
Thomas Moore

Thomas Moore
The Two Kings

King Eochaid came at sundown to a wood
Westward of Tara. Hurrying to his queen
He had outridden his war-wasted men
That with empounded cattle trod the mire,
.....
William Butler Yeats

William Butler Yeats
A Tried Friend, A True Friend

A friend for you and a friend for me,
A friend to understand;
To cheer the way and help the day
With heart as well as hand:
.....
Madison Julius Cawein

Madison Julius Cawein
Ode On A Distant Prospect Of Eton College

Ye distant spires, ye antique towers,
That crown the watery glade,
Where grateful Science still adores
Her Henry's holy shade;
.....
Thomas Gray

Thomas Gray
Sonnet 05

Some truths there be are better left unsaid;
Much is there that we may not speak unblamed.
On words, as wings, how many joys have fled!
The jealous fairies love not to be named.
.....

Henry Timrod
Endymion: Book Iii

There are who lord it o'er their fellow-men
With most prevailing tinsel: who unpen
Their baaing vanities, to browse away
The comfortable green and juicy hay
.....
John Keats

John Keats
The Iliad: Book 23

Thus did they make their moan throughout the city, while the
Achaeans when they reached the Hellespont went back every man to his
own ship. But Achilles would not let the Myrmidons go, and spoke to
his brave comrades saying, “Myrmidons, famed horsemen and my own
.....

Homer
To A Louse

ON SEEING ONE ON A LADY'S BONNET AT CHURCH

Ha! whare ye gaun, ye crowlin ferlie!
Your impudence protects you sairly:
.....
Robert Burns

Robert Burns
Eurolove

I cannot
and I will not
No, I cannot love you less
Like the flower to the butterfly
.....

Spike Milligan
Sonnets - Vi. - To......

"Miss not the occasion: by the forelock take
That subtile Power, the never-halting Time,
Lest a mere moment's putting-off should make
Mischance almost as heavy as a crime."
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Harvest-home

Once on a time did Eucritus and I
(With us Amyntas) to the riverside
Steal from the city. For Lycopeus' sons
Were that day busy with the harvest-home,
.....

Jon Corelis Theocritus
The Iliad Of Homer: Translated Into English Blank Verse: Book I.

Argument Of The First Book.


The book opens with an account of a pestilence that prevailed in the Grecian camp, and the cause of it is assigned. A council is called, in which fierce altercation takes place between Agamemnon and Achilles. The latter solemnly renounces the field. Agamemnon, by his heralds, demands Brisë is, and Achilles resigns her. He makes his complaint to Thetis, who undertakes to plead his cause with Jupiter. She pleads it, and prevails. The book concludes with an account of what passed in Heaven on that occasion.
.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
Birth-night Of The Humming Birds

I.

I'll tell you a Fairy Tale that's new:
How the merry Elves o'er the ocean flew
.....

Sam G. Goodrich