ERROR POEMS

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Venus And Adonis

Even as the sun with purple-coloured face
Had ta'en his last leave of the weeping morn,
Rose-cheeked Adonis hied him to the chase;
Hunting he loved, but love he laughed to scorn.
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Love's Supremacy

As yon great Sun in his supreme condition
Absorbs small worlds and makes them all his own,
So does my love absorb each vain ambition
Each outside purpose which my life has known.
.....
Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
Ad Finem.

On the white throat of the' useless passion
That scorched my soul with its burning breath
I clutched my fingers in murderous fashion,
And gathered them close in a grip of death;
.....
Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
The Reckoning

All profits disappear: the gain
Of ease, the hoarded, secret sum;
And now grim digits of old pain
Return to litter up our home.
.....

Theodore Roethke
Love, Hope, Desire, And Fear

...
And many there were hurt by that strong boy,
His name, they said, was Pleasure,
And near him stood, glorious beyond measure
.....
Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley
The Head And The Tail Of The Serpent.

[1]

Two parts the serpent has -
Of men the enemies -
.....

Jean De La Fontaine
Four Quartets 4: Little Gidding

I

Midwinter spring is its own season
Sempiternal though sodden towards sundown,
.....
T. S. Eliot

T. S. Eliot
Cassandra

Mirth the halls of Troy was filling,
Ere its lofty ramparts fell;
From the golden lute so thrilling
Hymns of joy were heard to swell.
.....

Friedrich Schiller
Hymn To Contrition

Tenderest Herald of the sky,
Nature's safeguard from perdition,
Friend of sweet, tho' tearful eye,
Call'd by angels meek Contrition-
.....
William Hayley

William Hayley
The Hunting Of The Snark

Dedication

Inscribed to a dear Child:
in memory of golden summer hours
.....
Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll
September 1, 1939

I sit in one of the dives
On Fifty-second Street
Uncertain and afraid
As the clever hopes expire
.....
W. H. Auden

W. H. Auden
An Essay On Man: Epistle I.

THE DESIGN.

Having proposed to write some pieces on human life and manners, such as (to use my Lord Bacon's expression) come home to men's business and bosoms, I thought it more satisfactory to begin with considering man in the abstract, his nature and his state; since, to prove any moral duty, to enforce any moral precept, or to examine the perfection or imperfection of any creature whatsoever, it is necessary first to know what condition and relation it is placed in, and what is the proper end and purpose of its being.

.....
Alexander Pope

Alexander Pope
The Sonnets Cxvi - Let Me Not To The Marriage Of True Minds

Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
An After-dinner Poem

(TERPSICHORE)

Read at the Annual Dinner of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, at
Cambridge, August 24, 1843.
.....

Oliver Wendell Holmes
IචPæan

o'er all and thro' all we shall hie,
With the cry 'Iö Pæan! and Echo, the strain,
From her cave 'Iö Pæan!' enraptured shall cry.

.....

Joseph Skipsey
At The Window

I have not always had this certainty, this pessimism which reassures the best among us. There was
a time when my friends laughed at me. I was not the master of my words. A certain indifference, I
have not always known well what I wanted to say, but most often it was because I had nothing to
say. The necessity of speaking and the desire not to be heard. My life hanging only by a thread.
.....

Paul Eluard
A Reformer

When I was young, my heart elate
With ardent notions warm,
I thirsted to inaugurate
A spirit of reform;
.....

Hattie Howard
The Good Man In Hell

If a good man were ever housed in Hell
By needful error of the qualities,
Perhaps to prove the rule or shame the devil,
Or speak the truth only a stranger sees,
.....

Edwin Muir
Questions Of Life

A bending staff I would not break,
A feeble faith I would not shake,
Nor even rashly pluck away
The error which some truth may stay,
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
The Man And His Image (prose Fable)

Once there was a man who loved himself very much, and who permitted himself no rivals in that love. He thought his face and figure the handsomest in all the world. Anything in the shape of a mirror that could show him his own likeness he took care to avoid; for he did not want to be reminded that perhaps he was over-rating his beauty. For this reason he hated looking-glasses and accused them of being false. He made a very great mistake in this respect; but that he did not mind, being quite content to live in the happiness the mistake afforded him.

To cure him of so grievous an error, officious Fate managed matters in such a way that wherever he turned his eyes they would fall on one of those mute little counsellors that ladies carry and appeal to when they are anxious about their appearance. He found mirrors in the houses; mirrors in the shops; mirrors in the pockets of gallants; mirrors even as ornaments on waist-belts of ladies.

.....

Jean De La Fontaine
Blind Old Milton

Place me once more, my daughter, where the sun
May shine upon my old and time-worn head,
For the last time, perchance. My race is run;
And soon amidst the ever-silent dead
.....

William Edmondstoune Aytoun
The Prayer Of Agassiz

On the isle of Penikese,
Ringed about by sapphire seas,
Fanned by breezes salt and cool,
Stood the Master with his school.
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
Poverty

I hate this grinding povertyâ??
To toil, and pinch, and borrow,
And be for ever haunted by
The spectre of to-morrow.
.....
Henry Lawson

Henry Lawson
Vanity

My tangoing seemed to delight her;
With me it was love at first sight.
I mentioned That I was a writer:
She asked me: “What is it you write?”
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
My Galley Chargèd With Forgetfulness

My galley chargèd with forgetfulness
Through sharp seas in winter nights doth pass
'Twene rock and rock; and eke mine enemy, alas,
That is my lord, steereth with cruelness.
.....

Sir Thomas Wyatt
Truth

Man, on the dubious waves of error toss'd,
His ship half founder'd, and his compass lost,
Sees, far as human optics may command,
A sleeping fog, and fancies it dry land;
.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
Luna

O France, although you sleep
We call you, we the forbidden!
The shadows have ears,
And the depths have cries.
.....

Victor Marie Hugo
Christmas Eve

I

Out of the little chapel I burst
Into the fresh night-air again.
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
The Farewell

_P_. Farewell to Europe, and at once farewell
To all the follies which in Europe dwell;
To Eastern India now, a richer clime,
Richer, alas! in everything but rhyme,
.....

Charles Churchill
Octaves

I

To get at the eternal strength of things,
And fearlessly to make strong songs of it,
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Hillcrest

(To Mrs. Edward MacDowell)

No sound of any storm that shakes
Old island walls with older seas
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Of Wit

TELL me, O tell, what kind of thing is Wit,
Thou who Master art of it.
For the First matter loves Variety less ;
Less Women love 't, either in Love or Dress.
.....
Abraham Cowley

Abraham Cowley
The Law

The sun may be clouded, yet ever the sun
Will sweep on its course till the cycle is run.
And when onto chaos the systems are hurled,
Again shall the Builder reshape a new world.
.....
Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
Sonnet

(”Three bills known as the Thompson-Bewley cannery bills have been
advanced to third reading in the Senate and Assembly at Albany. One
permits the canners to work their employés seven days a week, a second
allows them to work women after 9 p.m. and a third removes every
.....

Alice Duer Miller
The Mare's Nest

Jane Austen Beecher Stowe de Rouse
Was good beyond all earthly need;
But, on the other hand, her spouse
Was very, very bad indeed.
.....
Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
The God-maker, Man

Nevermore
Shall the shepherds of Arcady follow
Pan's moods as he lolls by the shore
Of the mere, or lies hid in the hollow;
.....
Don Marquis

Don Marquis
Paladins, Paladins, Youth Noble-hearted

Galahads, Galahads, Percivals, gallop!
Bayards, to the saddle!-the clangorous trumpets,
Hoarse with their ecstasy, call to the mellay.
Paladins, Paladins, Rolands flame-hearted,
.....
Don Marquis

Don Marquis
Seeking

In many a shape and fleeting apparition,
Sublime in age or with clear morning eyes,
Ever I seek thee, tantalising Vision,
Which beckoning flies.
.....

Mathilde Blind
Vivien-s Song

at the l.l.a. examination

In Algebra, if Algebra be ours,
x and x2 can ne'er be equal powers,
.....

Robert Fuller Murray
History

What wrecked the Roman power? One says vice,
Another indolence, another dice.
Emascle says polygamy. 'Not so,'
Says Impycu-''twas luxury and show.'
.....

Ambrose Bierce
Lit Instructor

Day after day up there beating my wings
with all the softness truth requires
I feel them shrug whenever I pause:
they class my voice among tentative things,
.....

William Stafford
Early Adieux

Adieu to kindred hearts and home,
To pleasure, joy, and mirth,
A fitter foot than mine to roam
Could scarcely tread the earth;
.....
Adam Lindsay Gordon

Adam Lindsay Gordon
Don Juan: Canto The Fourteenth

If from great nature's or our own abyss
Of thought we could but snatch a certainty,
Perhaps mankind might find the path they miss--
But then 'twould spoil much good philosophy.
.....

George Gordon Byron
Men

Man is a creature of a thousand whims;
The slave of hope and fear and circumstance.
Through toil and martyrdom a million years
Struggling and groping upward from the brute,
.....

Hanford Lennox Gordon
This Is Another Day

I am mine own priest, and I shrive myself
Of all my wasted yesterdays. Though sin
And sloth and foolishness, and all ill weeds
Of error, evil, and neglect grow rank
.....
Don Marquis

Don Marquis
The Progress Of Error.

Si quid loquar audiendam.--Hor. Lib. iv. Od. 2.



.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
A Panegyric

[To my Lord Protector, of the Present Greatness, and Joint Interest, of His Highness, and this Nation.]

While with a strong and yet a gentle hand,
You bridle faction, and our hearts command,
.....
Edmund Waller

Edmund Waller
Truth And Error

Twixt truth and error, there's this difference known
Error is fruitful, truth is only one.


.....

Robert Herrick
Elegy Xviii: Love's Progress

Who ever loves, if he do not propose
The right true end of love, he's one that goes
To sea for nothing but to make him sick.
Love is a bear-whelp born: if we o'erlick
.....
John Donne

John Donne
Father And Son

Be more than his dad,
Be a chum to the lad;
Be a part of his life
Every hour of the day;
.....
Edgar Albert Guest

Edgar Albert Guest