Who is Theodore Roethke

Theodore Huebner Roethke (/ˈrɛtki/ RET-kee; May 25, 1908 – August 1, 1963) was an American poet. Roethke is regarded as one of the most accomplished and influential poets of his generation.

Roethke's work is characterized by its introspection, rhythm and natural imagery. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1954 for his book The Waking, and he won the annual National Book Award for Poetry twice, in 1959 for Words for the Wind and posthumously in 1965 for The Far Field.

In the November 1968 edition of The Atlantic Monthly, former U.S. Poet Laureate and author James Dickey wrote Roethke was "in my opinion the greatest poet this country has yet produced."

Roethke was also a highly regarded poetry teacher. He taught at University of Wa...
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Theodore Roethke Poems

  • I Knew A Woman
    I knew a woman, lovely in her bones,
    When small birds sighed, she would sigh back at them;
    Ah, when she moved, she moved more ways than one:
    The shapes a bright container can contain! ...
  • The Minimal
    I study the lives on a leaf: the little
    Sleepers, numb nudgers in cold dimensions,
    Beetles in caves, newts, stone-deaf fishes,
    Lice tethered to long limp subterranean weeds, ...
  • Open House
    My secrets cry aloud.
    I have no need for tongue.
    My heart keeps open house,
    My doors are widely swung. ...
  • The Voice
    One feather is a bird,
    I claim; one tree, a wood;
    In her low voice I heard
    More than a mortal should; ...
  • The Reckoning
    All profits disappear: the gain
    Of ease, the hoarded, secret sum;
    And now grim digits of old pain
    Return to litter up our home. ...
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Top 10 most used topics by Theodore Roethke

Long 12 Wind 11 Time 11 Small 11 Light 11 Slow 11 Tree 10 Water 9 Night 8 Love 8


Theodore Roethke Quotes

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Comments about Theodore Roethke

  • Dearbhlakelly4: “this shaking keeps me steady. i should know. what falls away is always. and is near. i wake to sleep, and take my waking slow. i learn by going where i have to go” theodore roethke - ‘the waking’
  • Op109: "i learned not to fear infinity, the far field, the windy cliffs of forever, the dying of time in the white light of tomorrow, the wheel turning away from itself, the sprawl of the wave, the on-coming water." —theodore roethke, from “the far field”
  • Ariisooh: [명언]a mind too active is no mind at all. (theodore roethke)
  • Thephoenixflare: “love is not love until love’s vulnerable.” – theodore roethke
  • Favepoem: "my papa's waltz" by theodore roethke, read by william van fields. watch the video on our site
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Poem of the day

Carl Sandburg Poem
House
 by Carl Sandburg

TWO Swede families live downstairs and an Irish policeman upstairs, and an old soldier, Uncle Joe.
Two Swede boys go upstairs and see Joe. His wife is dead, his only son is dead, and his two daughters in Missouri and Texas don't want him around.
The boys and Uncle Joe crack walnuts with a hammer on the bottom of a flatiron while the January wind howls and the zero air weaves laces on the window glass.
Joe tells the Swede boys all about Chickamauga and Chattanooga, how the Union soldiers crept in rain somewhere a dark night and ran forward and killed many Rebels, took flags, held a hill, and won a victory told about in the histories in school.
Joe takes a piece of carpenter's chalk, draws lines on the floor and piles stove wood to show where six regiments were slaughtered climbing a slope.
'Here they went' and 'Here they went,' says Joe, and the January wind howls and the zero air weaves laces on the window glass.
The two Swede boys go downstairs with a big blur of guns, men, and hills in their heads. They eat herring and potatoes and tell the family war is a wonder and soldiers are a wonder.
One breaks out with a cry at supper: I wish we had a war now and I could be a soldier.
...

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