HISTORY POEMS

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Studio Composition

Cup of Words

Crystal sphere sitting
Before child like statue
.....

Joseph Mayo Wristen
You And Me

I'm part of people I have known
And they are part of me;
The seeds of thought that I have sown
In other minds I see.
.....

Robert Service
Suicide Note

SUICIDE NOTE
Part 1
Because of my cross, I find this life a misery
Like every cast in this dramatic adventure
.....

Okey Nwande
Joy

Joy, what could be more eperetising than the Joy of life. what is life without joy. Love it can be given and it can never be taken. What is life like without being loved.

There is a million of things that I would rather do than love another. I would count stars day to day admiring each and everyone of them. I am greedy in nature. I do nothing which is temporary. my main reason why I would spend a lifetime counting stars. No matter how many I count each day the end is never near .

.....

Faizel Malek
Is This Democracy

*IS THIS DEMOCRACY?*

Even in the mist of griefs and pains,
When the story shall be divulged,
.....

Paciolo Pen Saint
The Temple Of Friendship

Sacred to peace, within a wood's recess,
A blest retreat, where courtiers never press,
A temple stands, where art did never try
With pompous wonders to enchant the eye;
.....

Voltaire
Acrostic

Little maidens, when you look
On this little story-book,
Reading with attentive eye
Its enticing history,
.....

Lewis Carroll
No To Xenophobia

Michael Johnson once said " I don't fancy colors of the face, I'm always attracted to colors of the brain"

I understand we all have our differences.
But while learning about history
.....

Mancoba Dludlu
Santa Fe In Winter

The city is closing for the night.
Stores draw their blinds one by one,
and it's dark again, save for the dim

.....

Deborah Ager
Let History Be My Judge

We made all possible preparations,
Drew up a list of firms,
Constantly revised our calculations
And allotted the farms,
.....

W. H. Auden
Like A Vocation

Not as that dream Napoleon, rumour's dread and centre,
Before who's riding all the crowds divide,
Who dedicates a column and withdraws,
Nor as that general favourite and breezy visitor
.....

W. H. Auden
Elegy Written In A Country Churchyard

The curfew tolls the knell of parting day,
The lowing herd wind slowly o'er the lea,
The ploughman homeward plods his weary way,
And leaves the world to darkness and to me.
.....

Thomas Gray
Endymion: Book I

ENDYMION.

A Poetic Romance.

.....

John Keats
Endymion: Book Ii

O Sovereign power of love! O grief! O balm!
All records, saving thine, come cool, and calm,
And shadowy, through the mist of passed years:
For others, good or bad, hatred and tears
.....

John Keats
Sonnet 093: So Shall I Live, Supposing Thou Art True

So shall I live, supposing thou art true,
Like a deceivèd husband; so love's face
May still seem love to me, though altered new,
Thy looks with me, thy heart in other place.
.....

William Shakespeare
Michael: A Pastoral Poem

If from the public way you turn your steps
Up the tumultuous brook of Green-head Ghyll,
You will suppose that with an upright path
Your feet must struggle; in such bold ascent
.....

William Wordsworth
Four Quartets 3: The Dry Salvages

(The Dry Salvages-presumably les trois sauvages
- is a small group of rocks, with a beacon, off the N.E.
coast of Cape Ann, Massachusetts. Salvages is pronounced
to rhyme with assuages. Groaner: a whistling buoy.)
.....

T. S. Eliot
Four Quartets 4: Little Gidding

I

Midwinter spring is its own season
Sempiternal though sodden towards sundown,
.....

T. S. Eliot
Gerontion

Thou hast nor youth nor age
But as it were an after dinner sleep
Dreaming of both.

.....

T. S. Eliot
Gus: The Theatre Cat

Gus is the Cat at the Theatre Door.
His name, as I ought to have told you before,
Is really Asparagus. That's such a fuss
To pronounce, that we usually call him just Gus.
.....

T. S. Eliot
Sweeney Erect

And the trees about me,
Let them be dry and leafless; let the rocks
Groan with continual surges; and behind me
Make all a desolation. Look, look, wenches!
.....

T. S. Eliot
Ars Poetica

A poem should be palpable and mute
As a globed fruit,

Dumb
.....

Archibald Macleish
An Ancient To Ancients

Where once we danced, where once we sang,
Gentlemen,
The floors are sunken, cobwebs hang,
And cracks creep; worms have fed upon
.....

Thomas Hardy
The Convergence Of The Twain

(Lines on the loss of the “Titanic”)

I
In a solitude of the sea
.....

Thomas Hardy
Poeta Fit, Non Nascitur

“How shall I be a poet?
How shall I write in rhyme?
You told me once the very wish
Partook of the sublime:
.....

Lewis Carroll
The Hunting Of The Snark

Dedication

Inscribed to a dear Child:
in memory of golden summer hours
.....

Lewis Carroll
I Am The People, The Mob

I am the people-the mob-the crowd-the mass.
Do you know that all the great work of the world is
done through me?
I am the workingman, the inventor, the maker of the
.....

Carl Sandburg
Momus

Momus is the name men give your face,
The brag of its tone, like a long low steamboat whistle
Finding a way mid mist on a shoreland,
Where gray rocks let the salt water shatter spray
.....

Carl Sandburg
The Hour Before Dawn

A cursing rogue with a merry face,
A bundle of rags upon a crutch,
Stumbled upon that windy place
Called Cruachan, and it was as much
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Municipal Gallery Revisited

I

Around me the images of thirty years:
An ambush; pilgrims at the water-side;
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Players Ask For A Blessing On The Psalteries And On Themselves

Three Voices [together]. Hurry to bless the hands that play,
The mouths that speak, the notes and strings,
O masters of the glittering town!
O! lay the shrilly trumpet down,
.....

William Butler Yeats
Three Marching Songs

I

Remember all those renowned generations,
They left their bodies to fatten the wolves,
.....

William Butler Yeats
To Ireland In The Coming Times

Know, that I would accounted be
True brother of a company
That sang, to sweeten Ireland's wrong,
Ballad and story, rann and song;
.....

William Butler Yeats
Locksley Hall Sixty Years After

Late, my grandson! half the morning have I paced these sandy tracts,
Watch'd again the hollow ridges roaring into cataracts,

Wander'd back to living boyhood while I heard the curlews call,
.....

Alfred Lord Tennyson
Religio Laici

Dim, as the borrow'd beams of moon and stars
To lonely, weary, wand'ring travellers,
Is reason to the soul; and as on high,
Those rolling fires discover but the sky
.....

John Dryden
As Far From Pity, As Complaint

496

As far from pity, as complaint-
As cool to speech-as stone-
.....

Emily Dickinson
Dust Is The Only Secret

153

Dust is the only Secret-
Death, the only One
.....

Emily Dickinson
How The Waters Closed Above Him

923

How the Waters closed above Him
We shall never know-
.....

Emily Dickinson
One Crucifixion Is Recorded—only

553

One Crucifixion is recorded-only-
How many be
.....

Emily Dickinson
The Battle Fought Between The Soul

594

The Battle fought between the Soul
And No Man-is the One
.....

Emily Dickinson
Witchcraft Was Hung, In History

1583

Witchcraft was hung, in History,
But History and I
.....

Emily Dickinson
Yesterday Is History

1292

Yesterday is History,
'Tis so far away-
.....

Emily Dickinson
Dram-shop Ditty

I drink my fill of foamy ale
I sing a song, I tell a tale,
I play the fiddle;
My throat is chronically dry,
.....

Robert Service
Lip-stick Liz

Oh Lip-Stick Liz was in the biz, That's the oldest known in history;
She had a lot of fancy rags, Of her form she made no myst'ry.
She had a man, a fancy man, His name was Alexander,
And he used to beat her up because he couldn't understand her.
.....

Robert Service
The Law Of Laws

If we could roll back History
A century, let's say,
And start from there, I'm sure that we
Would find things as to-day:
.....

Robert Service
The Spell Of The Yukon

I wanted the gold, and I sought it,
I scrabbled and mucked like a slave.
Was it famine or scurvy-I fought it;
I hurled my youth into a grave.
.....

Robert Service
Stanza

Often rebuked, yet always back returning
To those first feelings that were born with me,
And leaving busy chase of wealth and learning
For idle dreams of things which cannot be:
.....

Emily Brontë
On Receipt Of My Mother’s Picture

Oh that those lips had language! Life has pass'd
With me but roughly since I heard thee last.
Those lips are thine-thy own sweet smiles I see,
The same that oft in childhood solaced me;
.....

William Cowper
Dirge

Knows he who tills this lonely field
To reap its scanty corn,
What mystic fruit his acres yield
At midnight and at morn?
.....

Ralph Waldo Emerson
Monadnoc

Thousand minstrels woke within me,
“Our music's in the hills; “-
Gayest pictures rose to win me,
Leopard-colored rills.
.....

Ralph Waldo Emerson
The Apology

Think me not unkind and rude,
That I walk alone in grove and glen;
I go to the god of the wood
To fetch his word to men.
.....

Ralph Waldo Emerson
The Odyssey: Book 17

When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,
Telemachus bound on his sandals and took a strong spear that suited
his hands, for he wanted to go into the city. “Old friend,” said he to
the swineherd, “I will now go to the town and show myself to my
.....

Homer
Metamorphoses: Book 07

The Argonauts now stemm'd the foaming tide,
And to Arcadia's shore their course apply'd;
Where sightless Phineus spent his age in grief,
But Boreas' sons engage in his relief;
.....

Ovid
Ballade Of Unfortunate Mammals

Love is sharper than stones or sticks;
Lone as the sea, and deeper blue;
Loud in the night as a clock that ticks;
Longer-lived than the Wandering Jew.
.....

Dorothy Parker
Song Of One Of The Girls

Here in my heart I am Helen;
I'm Aspasia and Hero, at least.
I'm Judith, and Jael, and Madame de Stael;
I'm Salome, moon of the East.
.....

Dorothy Parker
In The Naked Bed, In Plato’s Cave

In the naked bed, in Plato's cave,
Reflected headlights slowly slid the wall,
Carpenters hammered under the shaded window,
Wind troubled the window curtains all night long,
.....

Delmore Schwartz
The Ballad Of The Children Of The Czar

1

The children of the Czar
Played with a bouncing ball
.....

Delmore Schwartz
There Was A Young Person Whose History

There was a young person whose history,
Was always considered a mystery;
She sate in a ditch,
Although no one knew which,
.....

Edward Lear
The Pearl

The Kingdom of heaven is like unto a merchant man,
seeking goodly pearls; who, when he had found one,
sold all that he had and bought it.-Matthew 13.45

.....

George Herbert
Paul Revere’s Ride

Listen my children and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;
Hardly a man is now alive
.....

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow