CIRCLE POEMS

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Sadness

Lo, a pallid fleecy vapour
Far along the East is spread;
Every star has quench'd its taper,
Lately glimmering over head.
.....
George Borrow

George Borrow
I Want To Be Sane Again

I am a condemned
untamed wacky aberrant lunatic
I went berserk
I took leave of reasoning
.....
Michael Aete

Michael Aete
Interim

The room is full of you!-As I came in
And closed the door behind me, all at once
A something in the air, intangible,
Yet stiff with meaning, struck my senses sick!-
.....
Edna St. Vincent Millay

Edna St. Vincent Millay
Sonnet 08

VIII

Captain or Colonel, or Knight in Arms,
Whose chance on these defenceless dores may sease,
.....
John Milton

John Milton
The Breath Of Light

We are the gleam of infinite,
the breath of light,
the spark of life,
the chain of being,
.....
Alexis Karpouzos

Alexis Karpouzos
The Spark Of Life: AleΧis Karpouzos

We are the gleam of infinite,
the breathe of light,
the spark of life,
the chain of being,
.....
Alexis Karpouzos

Alexis Karpouzos
Thanksgiving

Gettin' together to smile an' rejoice,
An' eatin' an' laughin' with folks of your choice;
An' kissin' the girls an' declarin' that they
Are growin more beautiful day after day;
.....
Edgar Albert Guest

Edgar Albert Guest
Waring

I

What's become of Waring
Since he gave us all the slip,
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
A Patio

At evening
they grow weary, the patio's two or three colours.
Tonight, the moon, bright circle,
fails to dominate space.
.....

Jorge Luis Borges
South Of My Days

South of my days' circle, part of my blood's country,
rises that tableland, high delicate outline
of bony slopes wincing under the winter,
low trees, blue-leaved and olive, outcropping granite-
.....

Judith Wright
Thistledown

This might have been a place for sleep,
But, as from that small hollow there
Hosts of bright thistledown begin
Their dazzling journey through the air,
.....

Harold Monro
Endymion: Book I

ENDYMION.

A Poetic Romance.

.....
John Keats

John Keats
Parliament Hill Fields

ale as china
The round sky goes on minding its business.
Your absence is inconspicuous;
Nobody can tell what I lack.
.....

Sylvia Plath
Circle Of Life

Ignorance is the center point of life circle,
Obscuring our mind from knowing virtues,
Walking rough path thus preventing from enlightenment,
Never letting to go beyond the circle of life.
.....
Norbu Dorji

Norbu Dorji
The Unicorn

The saintly hermit, midway through his prayers
stopped suddenly, and raised his eyes to witness
the unbelievable: for there before him stood
the legendary creature, startling white, that
.....

Rainer Maria Rilke
Absalom And Achitophel

In pious times, ere priest-craft did begin,
Before polygamy was made a sin;
When man, on many, multipli'd his kind,
Ere one to one was cursedly confin'd:
.....
John Dryden

John Dryden
The Wizard Way

[Dedicated to General J.C.F. Fuller]

Velvet soft the night-star glowed
Over the untrodden road,
.....
Aleister Crowley

Aleister Crowley
The Old-fashioned Thanksgiving

It may be I am getting old and like too much to dwell
Upon the days of bygone years, the days I loved so well;
But thinking of them now I wish somehow that I could know
A simple old Thanksgiving Day, like those of long ago,
.....
Edgar Albert Guest

Edgar Albert Guest
The Iliad: Book 23

Thus did they make their moan throughout the city, while the
Achaeans when they reached the Hellespont went back every man to his
own ship. But Achilles would not let the Myrmidons go, and spoke to
his brave comrades saying, “Myrmidons, famed horsemen and my own
.....

Homer
Loving And Liking - Irregular Verses - Addressed To A Child (by My Sister)

There's more in words than I can teach:
Yet listen, Child! I would not preach;
But only give some plain directions
To guide your speech and your affections.
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
An Octopus

of ice. Deceptively reserved and flat,
it lies “in grandeur and in mass”
beneath a sea of shifting snow-dunes;
dots of cyclamen-red and maroon on its clearly defined
.....
Marianne Moore

Marianne Moore
The Golden Calf

After Heine.


Double flutes and horns resound
.....
John Hay

John Hay
Out Of The East

When man first walked upright and soberly
Reflecting as he paced to and fro,
And no more swinging from wide tree to tree,
Or sheltered by vast boles from sheltered foe,
.....

John Freeman
Euclid

Old Euclid drew a circle
On a sand-beach long ago.
He bounded and enclosed it
With angles thus and so.
.....
Vachel Lindsay

Vachel Lindsay
The Message

To you, my comrades, whether far or near,
I send this message. Let our past revive;
Come, sound reveille to our hearts once more.
Expecting, I shall wait till at my door
.....
Elizabeth Stoddard

Elizabeth Stoddard
Ode On A Distant Prospect Of Eton College

Ye distant spires, ye antique towers,
That crown the watery glade,
Where grateful Science still adores
Her Henry's holy shade;
.....
Thomas Gray

Thomas Gray
Folk Tune

It's not that the Muse feels like clamming up,
it's more like high time for the lad's last nap.
And the scarf-waving lass who wished him the best
drives a steamroller across his chest.
.....

Joseph Brodsky
On The Train

I

THE lady in front of me in the car,
With little red coils close over her ears,
.....
Harriet Monroe

Harriet Monroe
The Fight With The Dragon

Why run the crowd? What means the throng
That rushes fast the streets along?
Can Rhodes a prey to flames, then, be?
In crowds they gather hastily,
.....

Friedrich Schiller
Contentment

Glad hours have been when I have seen
Life's scope and each dry day's intent
United; so that I could stand
In silence, covering with my hand
.....
George Parsons Lathrop

George Parsons Lathrop
The Corn-stalk Fiddle

When the corn 's all cut and the bright stalks shine
Like the burnished spears of a field of gold;
When the field-mice rich on the nubbins dine,
And the frost comes white and the wind blows cold;
.....
Paul Laurence Dunbar

Paul Laurence Dunbar
The Cry Of A Lost Soul

In that black forest, where, when day is done,
With a snake's stillness glides the Amazon
Darkly from sunset to the rising sun,

.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
The Morai

FAIR OTAHEITE , fondly blest
By him who long was doom'd to brave
The fury of the Polar wave,
That fiercely mounts the frozen rock
.....

Helen Maria Williams
The Philosophical Egotist

Hast thou the infant seen that yet, unknowing of the love
Which warms and cradles, calmly sleeps the mother's heart above--
Wandering from arm to arm, until the call of passion wakes,
And glimmering on the conscious eye--the world in glory breaks?
.....

Friedrich Schiller
Today

This is To-day, a child in white and blue
Running to meet me out of Night who stilled
The ghost of Yester-eve; this is fair Morn
The mother of To-morrow. And these clouds
.....
Siegfried Sassoon

Siegfried Sassoon
A November Night

There! See the line of lights,
A chain of stars down either side the street-
Why can't you lift the chain and give it to me,
A necklace for my throat? I'd twist it round
.....

Sara Teasdale
Fingal - Book Iii

ARGUMENT.

Cuthullin, pleased with the story of Carril, insists with that bard for more of his songs. He relates the actions of Fingal in Lochlin, and death of Agandecca, the beautiful sister of Swaran. He had scarce finished, when Calmar, the son of Matha, who had advised the first battle, came wounded from the field, and told them of Swaran's design to surprise the remains of the Irish army. He himself proposes to withstand singly the whole force of the enemy, in a narrow pass, till the Irish should make good their retreat. Cuthullin, touched with the gallant proposal of Calmar, resolves to accompany him and orders Carril to carry off the few that remained of the Irish. Morning comes, Calmar dies of his wounds; and the ships of the Caledonians appearing, Swaran gives over the pursuit of the Irish, and returns to oppose Fingal's landing. Cuthullin, ashamed, after his defeat, to appear before Fingal re tires to the cave of Tura. Fingal engages the enemy, puts them to flight: but the coming on of night makes the victory not decisive. The king, who had observed the gallant behavior of his grandson Oscar, gives him advice concerning his conduct in peace and war. He recommends to him to place the example of his fathers before his eyes, as the best model for his conduct; which introduces the episode concerning Fainasóllis, the daughter of the king of Craca, whom Fingal had taken under his protection in his youth. Fillan and Oscar are despatched to observe the motions of the enemy by night: Gaul, the son of Morni, desires the command of the army in the next battle, which Fingal promises to give him. Some general reflections of the poet close the third day.

.....

James Macpherson
Irkalla's White Caves

I believe that a young woman
Is standing in a circle of lions
In the other side of the sky.

.....

Kenneth Patchen
The Sun Wields Mercy

and the sun wields mercy
but like a jet torch carried to high,
and the jets whip across its sight
and rockets leap like toads,
.....

Charles Bukowski
On A Circle

I'm up and down, and round about,
Yet all the world can't find me out;
Though hundreds have employ'd their leisure,
They never yet could find my measure.
.....
Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift
The Deliverance

Master only left old Mistus
One bright and handsome boy;
But she fairly doted on him,
He was her pride and joy.
.....

Frances Ellen Watkins Harper
Eve

Simply she stands at the cathedralâ??s
great ascent, close to the rose window,
with the apple in the apple-pose,
guiltless-guilty once and for all
.....

Rainer Maria Rilke
Tannhauser

To my mother. May, 1870.


The Landgrave Hermann held a gathering
.....
Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus
Christmas Eve

I

Out of the little chapel I burst
Into the fresh night-air again.
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
My Youth

Come, beneath yon verdant branches,
Come, my own, with me!
Come, and there my soul will open
Secret doors to thee.
.....

Morris Rosenfeld
Towns In Colour

I

Red Slippers

.....
Amy Lowell

Amy Lowell
An Essay On Man: Epistle I.

THE DESIGN.

Having proposed to write some pieces on human life and manners, such as (to use my Lord Bacon's expression) come home to men's business and bosoms, I thought it more satisfactory to begin with considering man in the abstract, his nature and his state; since, to prove any moral duty, to enforce any moral precept, or to examine the perfection or imperfection of any creature whatsoever, it is necessary first to know what condition and relation it is placed in, and what is the proper end and purpose of its being.

.....
Alexander Pope

Alexander Pope
The Cotter's Saturday Night

INSCRIBED TO ROBERT AIKEN, ESQ.

Let not Ambition mock their useful toil,
Their homely joys and destiny obscure;
.....
Robert Burns

Robert Burns
A Girdle

Whene'er the wast makes too much hast,
That hast againe makes too much wast.


.....
William Strode

William Strode