DEPTH POEMS

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My Friend

Art thou abroad on this stormy night
on thy journey of love, my friend?
The sky groans like one in despair.

.....

Rabindranath Tagore
A Dedication

My new-cut ashlar takes the light
Where crimson-blank the windows flare;
By my own work, before the night,
Great Overseer, I make my prayer.
.....
Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
Love

Love
Truth went forth on a search one day
I For the source of love that he might say
He had found its depth and its breadth for aye.
.....
Edgar Albert Guest

Edgar Albert Guest
Michael: A Pastoral Poem

If from the public way you turn your steps
Up the tumultuous brook of Green-head Ghyll,
You will suppose that with an upright path
Your feet must struggle; in such bold ascent
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Alone

From childhood's hour I have not been
As others were-I have not seen
As others saw-I could not bring
My passions from a common spring-
.....
Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe
Meaning Of Poem

The feelings of my heart,
The way of expressing,
Are poetry
In the area of ​​snuffery,
.....
Murari Lal

Murari Lal
In Snow Thou Comest'

1669

In snow thou comest-
Thou shalt go with the resuming ground,
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
The Divine Comedy By Dante: The Vision Of Hell, Or The Inferno: Canto Xix

Woe to thee, Simon Magus! woe to you,
His wretched followers! who the things of God,
Which should be wedded unto goodness, them,
Rapacious as ye are, do prostitute
.....

Dante Alighieri
Endymion: Book I

ENDYMION.

A Poetic Romance.

.....
John Keats

John Keats
Value Of Literature

Value of literature is above precious ruby,
It voice higher than the dictation of God,
So timeless, with in-depth human undergo,
Worthy of deep cerebral feelings to deal
.....
Santosh Kumar

Santosh Kumar
Absalom And Achitophel

In pious times, ere priest-craft did begin,
Before polygamy was made a sin;
When man, on many, multipli'd his kind,
Ere one to one was cursedly confin'd:
.....
John Dryden

John Dryden
The Man Against The Sky

Between me and the sunset, like a dome
Against the glory of a world on fire,
Now burned a sudden hill,
Bleak, round, and high, by flame-lit height made higher,
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Innocence

The height of wisdom seems to me
That of a child;
So let my ageing vision be
Serene and mild.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
Eurydice

I

So you have swept me back,
I who could have walked with the live souls
.....

Hilda Doolittle
Romance

Duet sing their favourite song in soft and tender voice.
Embrace each other in presence of their own fragrance.
Convey affection by producing their faint breeze.
Locking their lips together using tasting buds they relish.
.....
Memridul

Memridul
Rudiger

Bright on the mountain's heathy slope
The day's last splendors shine
And rich with many a radiant hue
Gleam gayly on the Rhine.
.....
Robert Southey

Robert Southey
The Voices Of The Death Chamber

The night lamp is faintly gleaming
Within my chamber still,
And the heavy shades of midnight
Each gloomy angle fill,
.....

Rosanna Eleanor Leprohon
An Ode On The Popular Superstitions Of The Highlands Of Scotland, Considered As The Subject Of Poetr

Home, thou return'st from Thames, whose naiads long
Have seen thee ling'ring with a fond delay
'Mid those soft friends, whose hearts, some future day,
Shall melt, perhaps, to hear thy tragic song.
.....

William Collins
Endymion: Book Iv

Muse of my native land! loftiest Muse!
O first-born on the mountains! by the hues
Of heaven on the spiritual air begot:
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot,
.....
John Keats

John Keats
Endymion: Book Iii

There are who lord it o'er their fellow-men
With most prevailing tinsel: who unpen
Their baaing vanities, to browse away
The comfortable green and juicy hay
.....
John Keats

John Keats
Prejudice

IN yonder red-brick mansion, tight and square,
Just at the town's commencement, lives the mayor.
Some yards of shining gravel, fenced with box,
Lead to the painted portal--where one knocks :
.....

Jane Taylor
The Widow On Windermere Side

I

How beautiful when up a lofty height
Honour ascends among the humblest poor,
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
A Pit'but Heaven Over It'

1712

A Pit-but Heaven over it-
And Heaven beside, and Heaven abroad,
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Creed

I believe in my heart that when
The wounded heart sunk within the depth of God sings
It rises from the pond alive
As if new-born.
.....

Gabriela Mistral
A Hidden Life

Proudly the youth, sudden with manhood crowned,
Went walking by his horses, the first time,
That morning, to the plough. No soldier gay
Feels at his side the throb of the gold hilt
.....
George Macdonald

George Macdonald
Death

O thou the last fulfilment of life,
Death, my death, come and whisper to me!

Day after day I have kept watch for thee;
.....

Rabindranath Tagore
The Night Before

Look you, Dominie; look you, and listen!
Look in my face, first; search every line there;
Mark every feature,-chin, lip, and forehead!
Look in my eyes, and tell me the lesson
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Epistle To My Brother George

Full many a dreary hour have I past,
My brain bewildered, and my mind o'ercast
With heaviness; in seasons when I've thought
No spherey strains by me could e'er be caught
.....
John Keats

John Keats
An Essay On Man: Epistle I.

THE DESIGN.

Having proposed to write some pieces on human life and manners, such as (to use my Lord Bacon's expression) come home to men's business and bosoms, I thought it more satisfactory to begin with considering man in the abstract, his nature and his state; since, to prove any moral duty, to enforce any moral precept, or to examine the perfection or imperfection of any creature whatsoever, it is necessary first to know what condition and relation it is placed in, and what is the proper end and purpose of its being.

.....
Alexander Pope

Alexander Pope
The Iliad Of Homer: Translated Into English Blank Verse: Book I.

Argument Of The First Book.


The book opens with an account of a pestilence that prevailed in the Grecian camp, and the cause of it is assigned. A council is called, in which fierce altercation takes place between Agamemnon and Achilles. The latter solemnly renounces the field. Agamemnon, by his heralds, demands Brisë is, and Achilles resigns her. He makes his complaint to Thetis, who undertakes to plead his cause with Jupiter. She pleads it, and prevails. The book concludes with an account of what passed in Heaven on that occasion.
.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
Hyperion: Book Ii

Just at the self-same beat of Time's wide wings
Hyperion slid into the rustled air,
And Saturn gain'd with Thea that sad place
Where Cybele and the bruised Titans mourn'd.
.....
John Keats

John Keats
A Something In A Summer's Day

122

A something in a summer's Day
As slow her flambeaux burn away
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
The Blind Man

Within a corner of this windowed room
He sits, and seldom speaks, and seldom
moves.
Forever left within eternal gloom,
.....

Leon Gellert
Hymn 163

Complaint of desertion and temptations.

Dear Lord! behold our sore distress;
Our sins attempt to reign;
.....
Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts
The Bereaved

We grudged not those that were dearer than all we possessed,
Lovers, brothers, sons.
Our hearts were full, and out of a full heart
We gave our belovèd ones.
.....

Robert Laurence Binyon
Tannhauser

To my mother. May, 1870.


The Landgrave Hermann held a gathering
.....
Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus
Ode To Sky

Thou, eternal home of shotful humans
So a harmful life may dip, but thou must
To such a situation, protect wanes
And the moon will fast a slow but so trust
.....
Pijush Biswas

Pijush Biswas
She

She who ever had remained in the depth of my being,
in the twilight of gleams and of glimpses;
she who never opened her veils in the morning light,
will be my last gift to thee, my God, folded in my final song.
.....

Rabindranath Tagore
The House Of Dust: Part 04: 03: Palimpsest: A Deceitful Portrait

Well, as you say, we live for small horizons:
We move in crowds, we flow and talk together,
Seeing so many eyes and hands and faces,
So many mouths, and all with secret meanings,—
.....

Conrad Potter Aiken
Heaven

Fish (fly-replete, in depth of June,
Dawdling away their wat'ry noon)
Ponder deep wisdom, dark or clear,
Each secret fishy hope or fear.
.....
Rupert Brooke

Rupert Brooke
Lover's Gifts Xvi: She Dwelt Here By The Pool

She dwelt here by the pool with its landing-stairs in ruins. Many
an evening she had watched the moon made dizzy by the shaking of
bamboo leaves, and on many a rainy day the smell of the wet earth
had come to her over the young shoots of rice.
.....

Rabindranath Tagore
The Triad

Show me the noblest Youth of present time,
Whose trembling fancy would to love give birth;
Some God or Hero, from the Olympian clime
Returned, to seek a Consort upon earth;
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Only Thee

That I want thee, only thee---let my heart repeat without end.
All desires that distract me, day and night,
are false and empty to the core.

.....

Rabindranath Tagore
O Those Eyes! I Have Them Known!

Oh, those eyes! I have them known!
How I loved them - knows God!
From their night of charm and throe,
I couldn't tear away my heart.
.....

Fyodor Ivanovich Tyutchev
Caledonia

Caledonia! thou land of the mountain and rock,
Of the ocean, the mist, and the wind-
Thou land of the torrent, the pine, and the oak,
Of the roebuck, the hart, and the hind;
.....
James Hogg

James Hogg
Time, A Poem

Genius of musings, who, the midnight hour
Wasting in woods or haunted forests wild,
Dost watch Orion in his arctic tower,
Thy dark eye fix'd as in some holy trance;
.....

Henry Kirk White
In Absence

WAKE, do you wake in the dark in the strange far place,
Window and door not set like the ones we knew,
Leaning your face through the dark for another face,
Stretching your arms to the arms that are far from you,
.....
Edith Nesbit

Edith Nesbit
Silence

(To Eleonora Duse)

We are anhungered after solitude,
Deep stillness pure of any speech or sound,
.....

Sara Teasdale
Rephan

Suggested by a very early recollection of a prose story by the noble woman and imaginative writer, Jane Taylor, of Norwich, (more correctly, of Ongar].
- R. B.


.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Peter Bell - A Tale (part Second)

PART SECOND

We left our Hero in a trance,
Beneath the alders, near the river;
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth