Who is Dante Alighieri

Durante di Alighiero degli Alighieri (Italian: [duˈrante deʎʎ aliˈɡjɛːri]; Latin: Dantes), commonly known by his name of art Dante Alighieri or simply as Dante (Italian: [ˈdante]; English: /ˈdɑːnteɪ/, UK also /ˈdænti, -teɪ/; c. 1265 – 1321), was an Italian poet during the Late Middle Ages. His Divine Comedy, originally called Comedìa (modern Italian: Commedia) and later christened Divina by Giovanni Boccaccio, is widely considered the most important poem of the Middle Ages and the greatest literary work in the Italian language.

In the late Middle Ages, most poetry was written in Latin, making it accessible only to the most educated readers. In De vulgari eloquentia (On Eloquence in the Vernacular), however, Dante defended the use of the...
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Top 10 most used topics by Dante Alighieri

Divine 100 Vision 97 Spirit 77 Long 69 Good 68 High 64 Answer 64 Guide 62 Thought 60 View 58


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Comments about Dante Alighieri

  • Georgeaduda5: "i did not die, and yet i lost life's breath." - dante alighieri
  • Kentadulted: italy is marking the 700th anniversary of the death of the medieval poet and philosopher dante alighieri. for all the lovers of italy and the language, we will embark in a learning journey with dante and his legacy. book this course here:
  • Ypgnt: talking about exile is eternal. from odysseus to dante alighieri and now the arab heart hurt from the same disease.
  • Harmonyshafi: the divine comedy annotated by dante alighieri
  • Mattyhugh: dante alighieri was the original shitposter
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Poem of the day

Michael Drayton Poem
Sonnet Lii: What? Dost Thou Mean
 by Michael Drayton

What? Dost thou mean to cheat me of my heart?
To take all mine and give me none again?
Or have thine eyes such magic or that art
That what they get they ever do retain?
Play not the tyrant, but take some remorse;
Rebate thy spleen, if but for pity's sake;
Or, cruel, if thou canst not, let us 'scourse,
And, for one piece of thine, my whole heart take.
...

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