SPACE POEMS

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Memories

Do memories last forever?
This thought runs through the mind of thinkers.
Memories are destined to fade,
But your most important memories,
.....

Borklo Solomon
Blindfolded Mind

Minds are deluded but
Not from beginning
Ignorance makes it, however
Essences of mind is crystal pure.
.....

Norbu Dorji
Rain

The sky is now cloudy
The wind has started to blow up
The birds are flying away in their homes
The tunder is ringing now
.....

Océane Malongo
Walt Whitman

I

I CELEBRATE myself;
And what I assume you shall assume;
.....

Walt Whitman
Gone But No Forgotten

Death is not a Gift,
Death is not an Award,
Nor a Degree or an Achivement,
But a Natural Phenomenon.
.....

Lebe Paul
The Praise Of Dust

‘What of vile dust?' the preacher said.
Methought the whole world woke,
The dead stone lived beneath my foot,
And my whole body spoke.
.....

G. K. Chesterton
High Flight

Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of Earth
And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
Sunward I've climbed, and joined the tumbling mirth
of sun-split clouds,-and done a hundred things
.....

John Gillespie Magee, Jr.
To A Young Poet Who Killed Himself

When you had played with life a space
And made it drink and lust and sing,
You flung it back into God's face
And thought you did a noble thing.
.....

Joyce Kilmer
The Wild Honey-suckle

Fair flower, that dost so comely grow,
Hid in this silent, dull retreat,
Untouched thy honied blossoms blow,
Unseen thy little branches greet;
.....

Philip Freneau
The Idea Of Ancestry

Taped to the wall of my cell are 47 pictures: 47 black
faces: my father, mother, grandmothers (1 dead), grand-
fathers (both dead), brothers, sisters, uncles, aunts,
cousins (1st and 2nd), nieces, and nephews.They stare
.....

Etheridge Knight
The Space Coast

Florida

An Airedale rolling through green frost,
cabbage palms pointing their accusing leaves
.....

Deborah Ager
In Praise Of Limestone

If it form the one landscape that we, the inconstant ones,
Are consistently homesick for, this is chiefly
Because it dissolves in water. Mark these rounded slopes
With their surface fragrance of thyme and, beneath,
.....

W. H. Auden
A Light Woman

I.

So far as our story approaches the end,
Which do you pity the most of us three?-
.....

Robert Browning
Truth To Tell

Vous n'etes que les masques sur des faces masquees
-Apollinaire

Start, then, with a sense of beginning, of sleep
.....

Jared Carter
But Outer Space

But outer Space,
At least this far,
For all the fuss
Of the populace
.....

Robert Frost
On A Tree Fallen Across The Road

(To hear us talk)

The tree the tempest with a crash of wood
Throws down in front of us is not bar
.....

Robert Frost
The Bonfire

“Oh, let's go up the hill and scare ourselves,
As reckless as the best of them to-night,
By setting fire to all the brush we piled
With pitchy hands to wait for rain or snow.
.....

Robert Frost
Endymion: Book I

ENDYMION.

A Poetic Romance.

.....

John Keats
Endymion: Book Ii

O Sovereign power of love! O grief! O balm!
All records, saving thine, come cool, and calm,
And shadowy, through the mist of passed years:
For others, good or bad, hatred and tears
.....

John Keats
Endymion: Book Iii

There are who lord it o'er their fellow-men
With most prevailing tinsel: who unpen
Their baaing vanities, to browse away
The comfortable green and juicy hay
.....

John Keats
Endymion: Book Iv

Muse of my native land! loftiest Muse!
O first-born on the mountains! by the hues
Of heaven on the spiritual air begot:
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot,
.....

John Keats
Hyperion: Book I

Deep in the shady sadness of a vale
Far sunken from the healthy breath of morn,
Far from the fiery noon, and eve's one star,
Sat gray-hair'd Saturn, quiet as a stone,
.....

John Keats
Hyperion: Book Ii

Just at the self-same beat of Time's wide wings
Hyperion slid into the rustled air,
And Saturn gain'd with Thea that sad place
Where Cybele and the bruised Titans mourn'd.
.....

John Keats
The Eve Of St. Agnes

St. Agnes' Eve-Ah, bitter chill it was!
The owl, for all his feathers, was a-cold;
The hare limp'd trembling through the frozen grass,
And silent was the flock in woolly fold:
.....

John Keats
To John Hamilton Reynolds

O that a week could be an age, and we
Felt parting and warm meeting every week,
Then one poor year a thousand years would be,
The flush of welcome ever on the cheek:
.....

John Keats
To The Nile

Son of the old Moon-mountains African!
Chief of the Pyramid and Crocodile!
We call thee fruitful, and that very while
A desert fills our seeing's inward span:
.....

John Keats
Written On A Blank Space At The End Of Chaucer’s Tale Of The Flowre And The Lefe

This pleasant tale is like a little copse:
The honied lines so freshly interlace,
To keep the reader in so sweet a place,
So that he here and there full-hearted stops;
.....

John Keats
Sonnet 044: If The Dull Substance Of My Flesh Were Thought

If the dull substance of my flesh were thought,
Injurious distance should not stop my way;
For then despite of space I would be brought,
From limits far remote, where thou dost stay.
.....

William Shakespeare
The Deserted Village

Sweet Auburn! loveliest village of the plain,
Where health and plenty cheered the labouring swain,
Where smiling spring its earliest visits paid,
And parting summer's lingering blooms delayed:
.....

Oliver Goldsmith
A Noiseless Patient Spider

A noiseless patient spider,
I marked where on a promontory it stood isolated,
Marked how to explore the vacant vast surrounding,
It launched forth filament, filament, filament, out of itself,
.....

Walt Whitman
Song At Sunset

Splendor of ended day, floating and filling me!
Hour prophetic-hour resuming the past!
Inflating my throat-you, divine average!
You, Earth and Life, till the last ray gleams, I sing.
.....

Walt Whitman
Song Of Myself

1
I celebrate myself, and sing myself,
And what I assume you shall assume,
For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.
.....

Walt Whitman
The Dalliance Of The Eagles

Skirting the river road, (my forenoon walk, my rest)
Skyward in air a sudden muffled sound, the dalliance of the eagles,
The rushing amorous contact high in space together,
The clinching interlocking claws, a living, fierce, gyrating wheel,
.....

Walt Whitman
Christabel

PART I

'Tis the middle of night by the castle clock
And the owls have awakened the crowing cock;
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The Nightingale

A Conversation Poem, April, 1798

No cloud, no relique of the sunken day
Distinguishes the West, no long thin slip
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Michael: A Pastoral Poem

If from the public way you turn your steps
Up the tumultuous brook of Green-head Ghyll,
You will suppose that with an upright path
Your feet must struggle; in such bold ascent
.....

William Wordsworth
The Power Of Armies Is A Visible Thing

The power of Armies is a visible thing,
Formal and circumscribed in time and space;
But who the limits of that power shall trace
Which a brave People into light can bring
.....

William Wordsworth
Historion

No man hath dared to write this thing as yet,
And yet I know, how that the souls of all men great
At times pass athrough us,
And we are melted into them, and are not
.....

Ezra Pound
Song In The Manner Of Housman

O woe, woe,
People are born and die,
We also shall be dead pretty soon
Therefore let us act as if we were
.....

Ezra Pound
Holy Sonnet Vi: This Is My Play’s Last Scene, Here Heavens Appoint

This is my play's last scene, here heavens appoint
My pilgrimage's last mile; and my race
Idly, yet quickly run, hath this last pace,
My span's last inch, my minute's latest point,
.....

John Donne
Holy Sonnet Vii: At The Round Earth’s Imagined Corners Blow

At the round earth's imagined corners blow
Your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise
From death, you numberless infinities
Of souls, and to your scattered bodies go,
.....

John Donne
The Broken Heart

He is stark mad, who ever says,
That he hath been in love an hour,
Yet not that love so soon decays,
But that it can ten in less space devour;
.....

John Donne
In A Museum

I

Here's the mould of a musical bird long passed from light,
Which over the earth before man came was winging;
.....

Thomas Hardy
The Masked Face

I found me in a great surging space,
At either end a door,
And I said: “What is this giddying place,
With no firm-fixéd floor,
.....

Thomas Hardy
Imaginary Weather

The consolations of space are nameless things.
-Wallace Stevens


.....

Jocelyn Emerson
Night Blindness

Beneath any common belief
lies the unspoken, occluded, torn
way we proceed. (On the beach
we were washed clean by transverse
.....

Jocelyn Emerson
Palinode

Strange gods occupied no space in that chaotic inflation of dark
and light,

or in the exponential expansion of a singular disturbance projecting
.....

Jocelyn Emerson
The Lighthouse

i.

Impatient with spring's incendiary budding, we longed for the
irreconcilable tossing of summer's phenomenal vowels: brief cawing
.....

Jocelyn Emerson
Spring Offensive

Halted against the shade of a last hill,
They fed, and, lying easy, were at ease
And, finding comfortable chests and knees
Carelessly slept. But many there stood still
.....

Wilfred Owen
The Little Black Boy

My mother bore me in the southern wild,
And I am black, but O! my soul is white.
White as an angel is the English child:
But I am black as if bereav'd of light.
.....

William Blake
The Mist

I am the mist, the impalpable mist,
Back of the thing you seek.
My arms are long,
Long as the reach of time and space.
.....

Carl Sandburg
Baile And Aillinn

ARGUMENT. Baile and Aillinn were lovers, but Aengus, the
Master of Love, wishing them to he happy in his own land
among the dead, told to each a story of the other's death, so
that their hearts were broken and they died.
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Shadowy Waters: Introductory Lines

I walked among the seven woods of Coole:
Shan-walla, where a willow-hordered pond
Gathers the wild duck from the winter dawn;
Shady Kyle-dortha; sunnier Kyle-na-no,
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Song Of The Happy Shepherd

The woods of Arcady are dead,
And over is their antique joy;
Of old the world on dreaming fed;
Grey Truth is now her painted toy;
.....

William Butler Yeats
To The Rose Upon The Rood Of Time

Red Rose, proud Rose, sad Rose of all my days!
Come near me, while I sing the ancient ways:
Cuchulain battling with the bitter tide;
The Druid, grey, wood-nurtured, quiet-eyed,
.....

William Butler Yeats
Demeter And Persephone

Faint as a climate-changing bird that flies
All night across the darkness, and at dawn
Falls on the threshold of her native land,
And can no more, thou camest, O my child,
.....

Alfred Lord Tennyson
Locksley Hall

Comrades, leave me here a little, while as yet ‘t is early morn:
Leave me here, and when you want me, sound upon the bugle-horn.

‘T is the place, and all around it, as of old, the curlews call,
.....

Alfred Lord Tennyson
Locksley Hall Sixty Years After

Late, my grandson! half the morning have I paced these sandy tracts,
Watch'd again the hollow ridges roaring into cataracts,

Wander'd back to living boyhood while I heard the curlews call,
.....

Alfred Lord Tennyson
The Lady Of Shalott

Part I

On either side the river lie
Long fields of barley and of rye,
.....

Alfred Lord Tennyson
The Palace Of Art

I built my soul a lordly pleasure-house,
Wherein at ease for aye to dwell.
I said, “O Soul, make merry and carouse,
Dear soul, for all is well.”
.....

Alfred Lord Tennyson