MOURN POEMS

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Little Lies

Life like lies
impeaches man of little lies
why isn't she perfect that man should lie.
go tell life I have a light to lite
.....
Matthew Francis

Matthew Francis
When I'm Killed

When I'm killed, don't think of me
Buried there in Cambrin Wood,
Nor as in Zion think of me
With the Intolerable Good.
.....
Robert Graves

Robert Graves
My Butterfly

Thine emulous fond flowers are dead, too,
And the daft sun-assaulter, he
That frightened thee so oft, is fled or dead:
Save only me
.....
Robert Frost

Robert Frost
Winsomity

Woman! when you told me we are birds of same feathers
You stole the chocolate from my heart
We almost bleed under your boobian chest
We almost render singspiration
.....
Saviour A Willie

Saviour A Willie
The Sonnets Cxxvii - In The Old Age Black Was Not Counted Fair

In the old age black was not counted fair,
Or if it were, it bore not beauty's name;
But now is black beauty's successive heir,
And beauty slander'd with a bastard shame:
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
The Dove

In Virgil's Sacred Verse we find,
That Passion can depress or raise
The Heav'nly, as the Human Mind:
Who dare deny what Virgil says?
.....
Matthew Prior

Matthew Prior
The Greek National Anthem

We knew thee of old,
Oh divinely restored,
By the light of thine eyes
And the light of thy Sword.
.....
Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
Oina-morul

After an address to Malvina, the daughter of Toscar, Ossian proceeds to relate his own expedition to Fuärfed, an island of Scandinavia. Mal-orchol, king of Fuärfed, being hard pressed in war by Ton-thormod, chief of Sar-dronto (who had demanded in vain the daughter of Mal-orchol in marriage,) Fingal sent Ossian to his aid. Ossian, on the day after his arrival, came to battle with Ton-thormod, and took him prisoner. Mal-orchol offers his daughter, Oina-morul, to Ossian; but he, discovering her passion for Ton-thormod, generously surrenders her to her lover, and brings about a reconciliation between the two kings.



.....

James Macpherson
On A Shadow In A Glass

By something form'd, I nothing am,
Yet everything that you can name;
In no place have I ever been,
Yet everywhere I may be seen;
.....
Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift
The Sonnets Cxxxii - Thine Eyes I Love, And They, As Pitying Me

Thine eyes I love, and they, as pitying me,
Knowing thy heart torment me with disdain,
Have put on black and loving mourners be,
Looking with pretty ruth upon my pain.
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Absalom And Achitophel

In pious times, ere priest-craft did begin,
Before polygamy was made a sin;
When man, on many, multipli'd his kind,
Ere one to one was cursedly confin'd:
.....
John Dryden

John Dryden
Old Men

People expect old men to die,
They do not really mourn old men.
Old men are different. People look
At them with eyes that wonder whenâ?¦
.....

Ogden Nash
To A Mountain Daisy

ON TURNING ONE DOWN WITH THE PLOUGH, IN APRIL, 1786

Wee, modest, crimson-tipped flow'r,
Thou's met me in an evil hour;
.....
Robert Burns

Robert Burns
The Songs Of Selma

ARGUMENTAddress to the evening star:

An apostrophe to Fingal and his times. Minonasings before the king the song of the unfortunate Colma; and the bards exhibit other specimens of their poetical talents; according to an annual custom established by the monarchs of the ancient Caledonians.

.....

James Macpherson
Sonnet Cxxxii

Thine eyes I love, and they, as pitying me,
Knowing thy heart torments me with disdain,
Have put on black and loving mourners be,
Looking with pretty ruth upon my pain.
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
O Were My Love Yon Lilac Fair

O were my Love yon lilac fair,
Wi' purple blossoms to the spring,
And I a bird to shelter there,
When wearied on my little wing;
.....
Robert Burns

Robert Burns
Fragment: Sufficient Unto The Day

Is not to-day enough? Why do I peer
Into the darkness of the day to come?
Is not to-morrow even as yesterday?
And will the day that follows change thy doom?
.....
Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley
A Good Man

I

A good man never dies--
In worthy deed and prayer
.....

James Whitcomb Riley
Adonais

I weep for Adonais-he is dead!
O, weep for Adonais! though our tears
Thaw not the frost which binds so dear a head!
And thou, sad Hour, selected from all years
.....
Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley
The Fickle Breeze

Sighing softly to the river
Comes the loving breeze,
Setting nature all a-quiver,
Rustling through the trees!
.....

William Schwenck Gilbert
An Ode On The Popular Superstitions Of The Highlands Of Scotland, Considered As The Subject Of Poetr

Home, thou return'st from Thames, whose naiads long
Have seen thee ling'ring with a fond delay
'Mid those soft friends, whose hearts, some future day,
Shall melt, perhaps, to hear thy tragic song.
.....

William Collins
In The Greenest Of The Valleys

I.
In the greenest of our valleys,
By good angels tenanted,
Once fair and stately palace,
.....
Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe
Sighs

All night I muse, all day I cry,
Ay me!
Yet still I wish, though still deny,
Ay me!
.....

Anonymous
The Iliad: Book 23

Thus did they make their moan throughout the city, while the
Achaeans when they reached the Hellespont went back every man to his
own ship. But Achilles would not let the Myrmidons go, and spoke to
his brave comrades saying, “Myrmidons, famed horsemen and my own
.....

Homer
The Change

POOR River, now thou'rt almost dry,
What Nymph, or Swain, will near thee lie?
Since brought, alas! to sad Decay,
What Flocks, or Herds, will near thee stay?
.....

Anne Kingsmill Finch
The Rebel

Call me traitor to my country and a rebel to my God.
And the foe of â??law and orderâ?, well deserving of the rod,
But I scorn the biassed sentence from the temples of the creed
That was fouled and mutilated by the ministers of greed,
.....
Henry Lawson

Henry Lawson
All Alone

I.

Ah! wherefore by the Church-yard side,
Poor little LORN ONE, dost thou stray?
.....

Mary Darby Robinson
Endymion: Book Iv

Muse of my native land! loftiest Muse!
O first-born on the mountains! by the hues
Of heaven on the spiritual air begot:
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot,
.....
John Keats

John Keats
Leo

I made a journey o'er the sea,
I bade my faithful dog good-bye,
I knew that he would grieve for me,
But did not dream that he would die!
.....
John L. Stoddard

John L. Stoddard
The Vision

THE SUN had clos'd the winter day,
The curless quat their roarin play,
And hunger'd maukin taen her way,
To kail-yards green,
.....
Robert Burns

Robert Burns
Gone With A Handsomer Man.

JOHN:

I've worked in the field all day, a-plowin' the "stony streak;"
I've scolded my team till I'm hoarse; I've tramped till my legs are weak;
.....

Will Carleton
Victory

I.
Before those golden altar-lights we stood,
Each one of us remembering his own dead.
A more than earthly beauty seemed to brood
.....
Alfred Noyes

Alfred Noyes
Sonnets To The Sundry Notes Of Music

I.
IT was a lording's daughter, the fairest one of three,
That liked of her master as well as well might be,
Till looking on an Englishman, the fair'st that eye could see,
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
The Angel-thief

TIME is a thief who leaves his tools behind him;
He comes by night, he vanishes at dawn;
We track his footsteps, but we never find him
Strong locks are broken, massive bolts are drawn,
.....

Oliver Wendell Holmes
Miriam

One Sabbath day my friend and I
After the meeting, quietly
Passed from the crowded village lanes,
White with dry dust for lack of rains,
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
As A World Would Have It

ALCESTIS

Shall I never make him look at me again?
I look at him, I look my life at him,
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
An Essay On Man: Epistle I.

THE DESIGN.

Having proposed to write some pieces on human life and manners, such as (to use my Lord Bacon's expression) come home to men's business and bosoms, I thought it more satisfactory to begin with considering man in the abstract, his nature and his state; since, to prove any moral duty, to enforce any moral precept, or to examine the perfection or imperfection of any creature whatsoever, it is necessary first to know what condition and relation it is placed in, and what is the proper end and purpose of its being.

.....
Alexander Pope

Alexander Pope
To Them That Mourn

(W.E.G., May 1898)

Lift up your heads: in life, in death,
God knoweth his head was high.
.....
G. K. Chesterton

G. K. Chesterton
The Last Suttee

Not many years ago a King died in one of the Rajpoot States.
His wives, disregarding the orders of the English against Suttee,
would have broken out of the palace had not the gates been barred.
But one of them, disguised as the King's favourite dancing-girl,
.....
Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
Psalm 13

Pleading with God under desertion.

How long, O Lord, shall I complain,
Like one that seeks his God in vain?
.....
Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts
The Things That Never Can Come Back, Are Several'

1515

The Things that never can come back, are several-
Childhood-some forms of Hope-the Dead-
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
The Legacy

My dearest Love! when thou and I must part,
And th' icy hand of death shall seize that heart
Which is all thine; within some spacious will
Ile leave no blanks for Legacies to fill:
.....

Henry King
Epitaph On Sir Thomas Hanmer, Bart.

Thou who survey'st these walls with curious eye,
Pause at this tomb where Hanmer's ashes lie;
His various worth through varied life attend,
And learn his virtues while thou mourn'st his end.
.....
Samuel Johnson

Samuel Johnson
November

As I walk the misty hill
All is languid, fogged, and still;
Not a note of any bird
Nor any motion's hint is heard,
.....

Robert Nichols
To -- (i)

I heed not that my earthly lot
Hath--little of Earth in it,
That years of love have been forgot
In the hatred of a minute:
.....
Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe
Lines In A Flyleaf Of 'christabel'

Inhospitably hast thou entertained,
O Poet, us the bidden to thy board,
Whom in mid-feast, and while our thousand mouths
Are one laudation of the festal cheer,
.....

William Watson
Fallen

My country! by our fathers reared
As champion of the world's opprest;
Whose moral force the tyrant feared;
Whose flag all struggling freemen cheered;
.....
John L. Stoddard

John L. Stoddard
The Wounded Hare

INHUMAN man! curse on thy barb'rous art,
And blasted be thy murder-aiming eye;
May never pity soothe thee with a sigh,
Nor ever pleasure glad thy cruel heart!
.....
Robert Burns

Robert Burns
Psalm 74

The church pleading with God under sore persecutions.

Will God for ever cast us off?
His wrath for ever smoke
.....
Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts
Admetus

To my friend, Ralph Waldo Emerson.


He who could beard the lion in his lair,
.....
Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus