GRATEFUL POEMS

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Why We Fight

This is the thing we fight:
A cry of terror in the night;
A ship on work of mercy bentâ??
A carrier of the sick and maimedâ??
.....
Edgar Albert Guest

Edgar Albert Guest
A Little Prayer

Let us be thankful, Lord, for little things-
The song of birds, the rapture of the rose;
Cloud-dappled skies, the laugh of limpid springs,
Drowned sunbeams and the perfume April blows;
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
Farewell Lines

"Hign bliss is only for a higher state,"
But, surely, if severe afflictions borne
With patience merit the reward of peace,
Peace ye deserve; and may the solid good,
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Scholars

"Oh, show me how a rose can shut and be a bud again!"
Nay, watch my Lords of the Admiralty, for they have the work in train.
They have taken the men that were careless lads at Dartmouth in 'Fourteen
And entered them at the landward schools as though no war had been.
.....
Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
People Like Candles

*PEOPLE LIKE CANDLES*

*"The world would have been a better domicile to dwell in, if our impediments are equally solved. But nay, some are like candles"* *paciolo pen saint*

.....
Paciolo Pen Saint

Paciolo Pen Saint
Thanksgiving

Gettin' together to smile an' rejoice,
An' eatin' an' laughin' with folks of your choice;
An' kissin' the girls an' declarin' that they
Are growin more beautiful day after day;
.....
Edgar Albert Guest

Edgar Albert Guest
Any Wife To Any Husband

I

My love, this is the bitterest, that thou
Who art all truth and who dost love me now
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
My Namesake

Addressed to Francis Greenleaf Allison of Burlington, New Jersey.

You scarcely need my tardy thanks,
Who, self-rewarded, nurse and tend--
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
How Fortunate The Man With None

From the play 'Mother Courage'

You saw sagacious Solomon
You know what came of him,
.....

Bertolt Brecht
The Guest House

This being human is a guest house.
Every morning a new arrival.

A joy, a depression, a meanness,
.....

Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi
Elegy Xxv. To Delia, With Some Flowers

Whate'er could Sculpture's curious art employ,
Whate'er the lavish hand of Wealth can shower,
These would I give-and every gift enjoy,
That pleased my fair-but Fate denies the power.
.....

William Shenstone
Product Of Inspiration

I have sought for inspiration.
I have pursued motivation
But I've come to realize that the best motivators of ourselves are within us, but my experience in life has made me who I am today.
I have come to appreciate that sometimes we don't get to choose what we want in life but we become products of circumstances.
.....
Bhekisipho Nyathi

Bhekisipho Nyathi
Take Me There By Reatlegile "cea" Marumolwa

Take me there
I will give you what you seek
I will help you to help yourself with this loose change
I will pay before I reach my destination
.....
Reatlegile Marumolwa

Reatlegile Marumolwa
The First Day's Night Had Come

410

The first Day's Night had come—
And grateful that a thing
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Prometheus

COVER thy spacious heavens, Zeus,
With clouds of mist,
And, like the boy who lops
The thistles' heads,
.....

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
Breakfast

Of all the meals that glad my day
My morning one's the best;
Purveyed me on a silver tray,
Immaculately dressed.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
To Charles Dickens

Go then to Italy; but mind
To leave the pale low France behind;
Pass through that country, nor ascend
The Rhine, nor over Tyrol wend:
.....
Walter Savage Landor

Walter Savage Landor
A Blue Valentine

(For Aline)


Monsignore,
.....
Joyce Kilmer

Joyce Kilmer
Locksley Hall Sixty Years After

Late, my grandson! half the morning have I paced these sandy tracts,
Watch'd again the hollow ridges roaring into cataracts,

Wander'd back to living boyhood while I heard the curlews call,
.....
Alfred Lord Tennyson

Alfred Lord Tennyson
Tender Arrivals

Where ever something breathes
Heart beating the rise and fall
Of mountains, the waves upon the sky
Of seas, the terror is our ignorance, that's
.....

Amiri Baraka
A True Account Of Talking To The Sun On Fire Island

y! I've been
trying to wake you up for fifteen
minutes. Don't be so rude, you are
only the second poet I've ever chosen
.....

Frank O'hara
The Unremitting Voice Of Nightly Streams

The unremitting voice of nightly streams
That wastes so oft, we think, its tuneful powers,
If neither soothing to the worm that gleams
Through dewy grass, nor small birds hushed in bowers,
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Youthful Maidens

Love, with rosy fetter,
Held us firmly bound;
Pure unmix'd enjoyment
Grateful here we found.
.....
George Borrow

George Borrow
Memorial Day

“Dulce et decorum est”


The bugle echoes shrill and sweet,
.....
Joyce Kilmer

Joyce Kilmer
A Child's Prayer

For Morn, my dome of blue,
For Meadows, green and gay,
And Birds who love the twilight of the leaves,
Let Jesus keep me joyful when I pray.
.....
Siegfried Sassoon

Siegfried Sassoon
Ode On A Distant Prospect Of Eton College

Ye distant spires, ye antique towers,
That crown the watery glade,
Where grateful Science still adores
Her Henry's holy shade;
.....
Thomas Gray

Thomas Gray
The Vision

THE SUN had clos'd the winter day,
The curless quat their roarin play,
And hunger'd maukin taen her way,
To kail-yards green,
.....
Robert Burns

Robert Burns
When Evening Shadows Fall

When evening shadows fall,
She hangs her cares away
Like empty garments on the wall
That hides her from the day;
.....

James Whitcomb Riley
Andrew Rykman-s Prayer

Andrew Rykman's dead and gone;
You can see his leaning slate
In the graveyard, and thereon
Read his name and date.
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
Thanksgiving

The Autumn hills are golden at the top,
And rounded as a poet's silver rhyme;
The mellow days are ruby ripe, that drop
One after one into the lap of time.
.....

Kate Seymour Maclean
The Morai

FAIR OTAHEITE , fondly blest
By him who long was doom'd to brave
The fury of the Polar wave,
That fiercely mounts the frozen rock
.....

Helen Maria Williams
An After-dinner Poem

(TERPSICHORE)

Read at the Annual Dinner of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, at
Cambridge, August 24, 1843.
.....

Oliver Wendell Holmes
Bastard

The very skies wee black with shame,
As near my moment drew;
The very hour before you cam
I felt I hated you.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
Lines On Niagaras [sic] Charms And Death

Gazing on rapid's mighty sea,
Struggling fiercely to be free,
But drawn downward in its course
By gravitation's wonderous force,
.....

James Mcintyre
Burns

MY OWN WILD BURNS! these rude-wrought rhymes of thine
In golden worth are like the unshapely coin
Of some new realm, yet pure as from the mineâ??
And Art may well be spared with such alloy
.....

Charles Harpur
To May

THOUGH many suns have risen and set
Since thou, blithe May, wert born,
And Bards, who hailed thee, may forget
Thy gift, thy beauty scorn;
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Admetus

To my friend, Ralph Waldo Emerson.


He who could beard the lion in his lair,
.....
Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus
The Reprieve

A MOMENT since, he stood unmoved--alone;
Courage and thought on his resolvēd brow;
But hope is quivering in the broken tone,
Whose bitter anguish seems to shake him now:
.....
Caroline Elizabeth Sarah Norton

Caroline Elizabeth Sarah Norton
A Grace After Dinner

O THOU, in whom we live and moveâ??
Who made the sea and shore;
Thy goodness constantly we prove,
And grateful would adore;
.....
Robert Burns

Robert Burns
The Paroo

It was a week from Christmas-time,
As near as I remember,
And half a year since, in the rear,
We'd left the Darling timber.
.....
Henry Lawson

Henry Lawson
The Grateful Snake.

Ingratitude! of earth the shame!
Thou monster, at whose hated name,
The nerves of kindness ake;
Would I could drive thee from mankind,
.....
William Hayley

William Hayley
The Iliad Of Homer: Translated Into English Blank Verse: Book I.

Argument Of The First Book.


The book opens with an account of a pestilence that prevailed in the Grecian camp, and the cause of it is assigned. A council is called, in which fierce altercation takes place between Agamemnon and Achilles. The latter solemnly renounces the field. Agamemnon, by his heralds, demands Brisë is, and Achilles resigns her. He makes his complaint to Thetis, who undertakes to plead his cause with Jupiter. She pleads it, and prevails. The book concludes with an account of what passed in Heaven on that occasion.
.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
Sword Blades And Poppy Seed

A drifting, April, twilight sky,
A wind which blew the puddles dry,
And slapped the river into waves
That ran and hid among the staves
.....
Amy Lowell

Amy Lowell
Horace I, 4.

'Tis spring! the boats bound to the sea;
The breezes, loitering kindly over
The fields, again bring herds and men
The grateful cheer of honeyed clover.
.....
Eugene Field

Eugene Field
Vignettes 22: To The Hetman, Platoff

O ancient warrior! as we hail thee,
And behold thy cordial smile,
We hope that greetings ne'er may fail thee,
Such as those of Britain's isle.
.....
Matilda Betham

Matilda Betham
The Fan : A Poem. Book I.

I sing that graceful toy, whose waving play,
With gentle gales relieves the sultry day.
Not the wide fan by Persian dames display'd,
Which o'er their beauty casts a grateful shade;
.....
John Gay

John Gay
Blessings On Children

Blessings on the blessing children, sweetest gifts of Heaven to earth,
Filling all the heart with gladness, filling all the house with mirth;
Bringing with them native sweetness, pictures of the primal bloom,
Which the bliss for ever gladdens, of the region whence they come;
.....

William Gilmore Simms
Fears In Solitude

Written in April 1798, during the alarm of an invasion

A green and silent spot, amid the hills,
A small and silent dell! O'er stiller place
.....
Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Isaac And Archibald

(To Mrs. Henry Richards)

Isaac and Archibald were two old men.
I knew them, and I may have laughed at them
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
The Iliad: Book 24

The assembly now broke up and the people went their ways each to his
own ship. There they made ready their supper, and then bethought
them of the blessed boon of sleep; but Achilles still wept for
thinking of his dear comrade, and sleep, before whom all things bow,
.....

Homer