ENDURE POEMS

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Lonely Traveller

LONELY TRAVELLER

I am a lonely traveller
Love is the path I walk on
.....
Mohammad Younus

Mohammad Younus
The Sonnets Cliii - Cupid Laid By His Brand And Fell Asleep

Cupid laid by his brand and fell asleep:
A maid of Dian's this advantage found,
And his love-kindling fire did quickly steep
In a cold valley-fountain of that ground;
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Canto Xlv

With Usura

With usura hath no man a house of good stone
each block cut smooth and well fitting
.....
Ezra Pound

Ezra Pound
Michael: A Pastoral Poem

If from the public way you turn your steps
Up the tumultuous brook of Green-head Ghyll,
You will suppose that with an upright path
Your feet must struggle; in such bold ascent
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Upon A Snail

She goes but softly, but she goeth sure,
She stumbles not, as stronger creatures do.
Her journey's shorter, so she may endure
Better than they which do much farther go.
.....
John Bunyan

John Bunyan
Waring

I

What's become of Waring
Since he gave us all the slip,
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
My Namesake

Addressed to Francis Greenleaf Allison of Burlington, New Jersey.

You scarcely need my tardy thanks,
Who, self-rewarded, nurse and tend--
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
Venus And Adonis

Even as the sun with purple-coloured face
Had ta'en his last leave of the weeping morn,
Rose-cheeked Adonis hied him to the chase;
Hunting he loved, but love he laughed to scorn.
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
The Tripodal Firestones

Women! You are like our tripodal Firestones
Blackened by service; confined within
The ashen heat of your masters,
Burning with broken promises and matrimonial taboos
.....
Dauda Tholley

Dauda Tholley
Truth-is As Old As God

836

Truthâ??is as old as Godâ??
His Twin identity
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Endymion: Book I

ENDYMION.

A Poetic Romance.

.....
John Keats

John Keats
It Takes Courage

It takes strength to conquer, it takes courage to surrender.
It takes strength to be certain, it takes courage to have doubt.
It takes strength to fit in, it takes courage to stand out.

.....

Anonymous
The Redeemer

Darkness: the rain sluiced down; the mire was deep;
It was past twelve on a mid-winter night,
When peaceful folk in beds lay snug asleep;
There, with much work to do before the light,
.....
Siegfried Sassoon

Siegfried Sassoon
The Fourth Of August

Now in thy splendour go before us.
Spirit of England, ardent-eyed,
Enkindle this dear earth that bore us
In the hour of peril purified.
.....

Robert Laurence Binyon
The Two Ages

On a great cathedral window I have seen
A Summer sunset swoon and sink away,
Lost in the splendours of immortal art.
Angels and saints and all the heavenly hosts,
.....
Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
Truth'is As Old As God

836

Truth-is as old as God-
His Twin identity
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
The Wish

Well then; I now do plainly see
This busy world and I shall ne'er agree.
The very honey of all earthly joy
Does of all meats the soonest cloy;
.....
Abraham Cowley

Abraham Cowley
A Rolling Stone

There's sunshine in the heart of me,
My blood sings in the breeze;
The mountains are a part of me,
I'm fellow to the trees.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
Ribb Considers Christian Love Insufficient

Why should I seek for love or study it?
It is of God and passes human wit.
I study hatred with great diligence,
For that's a passion in my own control,
.....
William Butler Yeats

William Butler Yeats
The Italian In England

That second time they hunted me
From hill to plain, from shore to sea,
And Austria, hounding far and wide
Her blood-hounds through the countryside,
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Irony

An arid daylight shines along the beach
Dried to a grey monotony of tone,
And stranded jelly-fish melt soft upon
The sun-baked pebbles, far beyond their reach
.....
Amy Lowell

Amy Lowell
Pour Out Your Sorrows, My Heart (verse Xlvi)

Pour out your sorrows, my heart,
But let none discover where;
For my pride makes me forbear
My heart's sorrows to impart.
.....

Jose Marti
A Dialogue Of Self And Soul

My Soul. I summon to the winding ancient stair;
Set all your mind upon the steep ascent,
Upon the broken, crumbling battlement,
Upon the breathless starlit air,
.....
William Butler Yeats

William Butler Yeats
The Child Of The Islands - Winter

I.

ERE the Night cometh! On how many graves
Rests, at this hour, their first cold winter's snow!
.....
Caroline Elizabeth Sarah Norton

Caroline Elizabeth Sarah Norton
The Iliad: Book 03

When the companies were thus arrayed, each under its own captain,
the Trojans advanced as a flight of wild fowl or cranes that scream
overhead when rain and winter drive them over the flowing waters of
Oceanus to bring death and destruction on the Pygmies, and they
.....

Homer
Sighs

All night I muse, all day I cry,
Ay me!
Yet still I wish, though still deny,
Ay me!
.....

Anonymous
Hymn 170

God incomprehensible and sovereign.

[Can creatures to perfection find
Th' eternal, uncreated Mind?
.....
Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts
Iii. O Thou, Whose Stern Command And Precepts Pure...

O THOU, whose stern command and precepts pure
(Tho' agony in every vein should start,
And slowly drain the blood-drops from the heart)
Have bade the patient spirit still endure;
.....

William Lisle Bowles
The Hunting Of The Snark

Dedication

Inscribed to a dear Child:
in memory of golden summer hours
.....
Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll
Endymion: Book Iv

Muse of my native land! loftiest Muse!
O first-born on the mountains! by the hues
Of heaven on the spiritual air begot:
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot,
.....
John Keats

John Keats
Be Still, My Soul, Be Still; The Arms You Bear Are Brittle

Be still, my soul, be still; the arms you bear are brittle,
Earth and high heaven are fixt of old and founded strong.
Think rather,-call to thought, if now you grieve a little,
The days when we had rest, O soul, for they were long.
.....
A. E. Housman

A. E. Housman
That The Night Come

She lived in storm and strife,
Her soul had such desire
For what proud death may bring
That it could not endure
.....
William Butler Yeats

William Butler Yeats
A Pastiche For Eve

Unmanageable as history: these
Followers of Tammuz to the land
That offered no return, where dust
Grew thick on every bolt and door. And so the world
.....

Weldon Kees
The Odyssey: Book 17

When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,
Telemachus bound on his sandals and took a strong spear that suited
his hands, for he wanted to go into the city. “Old friend,” said he to
the swineherd, “I will now go to the town and show myself to my
.....

Homer
The Water Lily

This lovely lily, so pure and white,
Seems covered o'er with celestial light;
As if it grew on the "Tree of Life,"
And not down here, in this world of strife;
.....

Joseph Horatio Chant
Nearer

Nearer and ever nearer...
My body, tired but tense,
Hovers 'twixt vague pleasure
And tremulous confidence.
.....

Robert Nichols
Victory

The schools marched in procession in happiness and pride,
The city bands before them, the soldiers marched beside;
Oh, starched white frocks and sashes and suits that high schools wear,
The boy scout and the boy lout and all the rest were there,
.....
Henry Lawson

Henry Lawson
Symptoms Of Love

Love is universal migraine,
A bright stain on the vision
Blotting out reason.

.....
Robert Graves

Robert Graves
A Forsaken Garden

In a coign of the cliff between lowland and highland,
At the sea-down's edge between windward and lee,
Walled round with rocks as an inland island,
The ghost of a garden fronts the sea.
.....
Algernon Charles Swinburne

Algernon Charles Swinburne
Open House

My secrets cry aloud.
I have no need for tongue.
My heart keeps open house,
My doors are widely swung.
.....

Theodore Roethke
Aims At Happiness

HOW oft has sounded whip and wheel,
How oft is buckled spur to heel,
How many a steed in short relay
Stands harnessed on the king's highway,
.....

Jane Taylor
Liege

Betwixt the Foe and France was she --
France the immortal, France the free.
The Foe, like one vast living sea,
Drew nigh.
.....

William Watson
For The King

Northern Mexico, 1640


As you look from the plaza at Leon west
.....
Bret Harte

Bret Harte
An Ode - Presented To The King, On His Majesty's Arrival In Holland, After The Queen's Death

At Mary's tomb (sad sacred place!)
The Virtues shall their vigils keep,
And every Muse and every Grace
In solemn state shall ever weep.
.....
Matthew Prior

Matthew Prior
The Iliad Of Homer: Translated Into English Blank Verse: Book I.

Argument Of The First Book.


The book opens with an account of a pestilence that prevailed in the Grecian camp, and the cause of it is assigned. A council is called, in which fierce altercation takes place between Agamemnon and Achilles. The latter solemnly renounces the field. Agamemnon, by his heralds, demands Brisë is, and Achilles resigns her. He makes his complaint to Thetis, who undertakes to plead his cause with Jupiter. She pleads it, and prevails. The book concludes with an account of what passed in Heaven on that occasion.
.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
Life

WE are born; we laugh; we weep;
We love; we droop; we die!
Ah! wherefore do we laugh or weep?
Why do we live, or die?
.....

Barry Cornwall
Sonnet Viii

I live, I burn, I drown and I die
I endure at once chill and cold;
Life is too hard and too soft to hold;
I am joyful and sad, don't ask me why.
.....

Louise Labe
To A Lady

Oh! had my Fate been join'd with thine,
As once this pledge appear'd a token,
These follies had not, then, been mine,
For, then, my peace had not been broken.
.....
George Gordon Lord Byron

George Gordon Lord Byron
Marmion: Canto Iii. - The Inn

I.

The livelong day Lord Marmion rode:
The mountain path the Palmer showed,
.....

Walter Scott (sir)