Who is Sir Philip Sidney

Sir Philip Sidney (30 November 1554 – 17 October 1586) was an English poet, courtier, scholar, and soldier, who is remembered as one of the most prominent figures of the Elizabethan age. His works include Astrophel and Stella, The Defence of Poesy (also known as The Defence of Poetry or An Apology for Poetry), and The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia.

Early life Born at Penshurst Place, Kent, he was the eldest son of Sir Henry Sidney and Lady Mary Dudley. His mother was the eldest daughter of John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland, and the sister of Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester. His younger brother, Robert Sidney was a statesman and patron of the arts, and was created Earl of Leicester in 1618. His younger sister, Mary, married Henry Herbert, 2nd E...
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Sir Philip Sidney Poems

  • Sonnet 101: Stella Is Sick
    Stella is sick, and in that sickbed lies
    Sweetness, which breathes and pants as oft as she:
    And Grace, sick too, such fine conclusions tries
    That Sickness brags itself best grac'd to be. ...
  • Sonnet 102: Wher Be Those Roses Gone
    Where be those roses gone, which sweeten'd so our eyes?
    Where those red cheeks, which oft with fair increase did frame
    The height of honor in the kindly badge of shame?
    Who hath the crimson weeds stol'n from my morning skies? ...
  • Sonnet Xi: In Truth, Oh Love
    In truth, oh Love, with what a boyish kind
    Thou doest proceed in thy most serious ways:
    That when the heav'n to thee his best displays,
    Yet of that best thou leav'st the best behind. ...
  • Astrophel And Stella: Xcii
    Be your words made, good sir, of Indian ware,
    That you allow me them by so small rate?
    Or do you cutted Spartans imitate?
    Or do you mean my tender ears to spare, ...
  • Sonnet 77: Those Looks, Whose Beams Be Joy
    Those looks, whose beams be joy, whose motion is delight,
    That face, whose lecture shows what perfect beauty is:
    That presence, which doth give dark hearts a living light:
    That grace, which Venus weeps that she herself doth miss: ...
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Top 10 most used topics by Sir Philip Sidney

Sonnet 122 I Love You 119 Love 119 Heart 91 Sweet 55 Nature 46 Face 45 Light 44 Place 43 Good 42


Sir Philip Sidney Quotes

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Comments about Sir Philip Sidney

  • Churchlifend: literary language, as sir philip sidney says, “figures forth good things.” in so doing, it is virtuous in and of itself, and it figures forth virtue in the reader as well. --karen swallow-prior
  • Nekomessiah144: sir philip sidney has a lot of narrative poems that take hours to conclude and he sang them kind of like homer sang his epics during antiquity, but who does this in music now at all?
  • Rose_is_: sir philip sidney on how to overcome writer’s block: “‘fool,’ said my muse to me, ‘look in thy heart, and write.’”
  • Stereorooster: astrophil and stella 1: loving in truth, and fain in verse my love to show by sir philip sidney
  • Znsbahamas242: during his tribute in the house of assembly, prime minister & min. of finance the hon. philip davis said that, as bahamians mourn its nation’s loss, they marvel at how far sir sidney traveled, and the courage it must have required.
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Poem of the day

Alfred Lord Tennyson Poem
In Memoriam A. H. H.: 96. You Say, But With No Touch Of Sco
 by Alfred Lord Tennyson

You say, but with no touch of scorn,
Sweet-hearted, you, whose light-blue eyes
Are tender over drowning flies,
You tell me, doubt is Devil-born.
I know not: one indeed I knew
In many a subtle question versed,
Who touch'd a jarring lyre at first,
But ever strove to make it true:
...

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