Who is Sir Philip Sidney

Sir Philip Sidney (30 November 1554 – 17 October 1586) was an English poet, courtier, scholar and soldier who is remembered as one of the most prominent figures of the Elizabethan age. His works include Astrophel and Stella, The Defence of Poesy (also known as The Defence of Poetry or An Apology for Poetry) and The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia.

Early life

Born at Penshurst Place, Kent, of an aristocratic family, he was educated at Shrewsbury School and Christ Church, Oxford. He was the eldest son of Sir Henry Sidney and Lady Mary Dudley. His mother was the eldest daughter of John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland, and the sister of Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester. His younger brother, Robert Sidney was a statesman and patron of the arts, and was created E...
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Sir Philip Sidney Poems

  • Sonnet 101: Stella Is Sick
    Stella is sick, and in that sickbed lies
    Sweetness, which breathes and pants as oft as she:
    And Grace, sick too, such fine conclusions tries
    That Sickness brags itself best grac'd to be. ...
  • Sonnet 102: Wher Be Those Roses Gone
    Where be those roses gone, which sweeten'd so our eyes?
    Where those red cheeks, which oft with fair increase did frame
    The height of honor in the kindly badge of shame?
    Who hath the crimson weeds stol'n from my morning skies? ...
  • Sonnet Xi: In Truth, Oh Love
    In truth, oh Love, with what a boyish kind
    Thou doest proceed in thy most serious ways:
    That when the heav'n to thee his best displays,
    Yet of that best thou leav'st the best behind. ...
  • Astrophel And Stella: Xcii
    Be your words made, good sir, of Indian ware,
    That you allow me them by so small rate?
    Or do you cutted Spartans imitate?
    Or do you mean my tender ears to spare, ...
  • Sonnet 77: Those Looks, Whose Beams Be Joy
    Those looks, whose beams be joy, whose motion is delight,
    That face, whose lecture shows what perfect beauty is:
    That presence, which doth give dark hearts a living light:
    That grace, which Venus weeps that she herself doth miss: ...
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Top 10 most used topics by Sir Philip Sidney

Sonnet 122 I Love You 119 Love 119 Heart 91 Sweet 55 Nature 46 Face 45 Light 44 Place 43 Good 42


Sir Philip Sidney Quotes

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Comments about Sir Philip Sidney

Ewinkler: 'biting my truant pen, beating myself for spite, 'fool,' said my muse to me, 'look in thy heart, and write.' - sir philip sidney
Historyofnl: the fatal wounding of sir philip sidney, by benjamin west (painted 1806).
Nekomatapoetry: astrophel and stella, an elizabethan sonnet sequence of 108 sonnets, interspersed with 11 songs, by sir philip sidney, written in 1582 and published posthumously in 1591. the work is often considered the finest elizabethan sonnet cycle after william shakespeare's sonnets.
Nekomatapoetry: my lute, within thyself thy tunes enclose by sir philip sidney my lute, within thyself thy tunes enclose; thy mistress' song is now a sorrow's cry;
Nekomatapoetry: the nightingale by sir philip sidney the nightingale, as soon as april bringeth unto her rested sense a perfect waking, while late bare earth, proud of new clothing, springeth, sings out her woes, a thorn her song-book making, and mournfully bewailing,
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Poem of the day

Emily Dickinson Poem
Some Wretched creature, savior take
 by Emily Dickinson

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Some Wretched creature, savior take
Who would exult to die
And leave for thy sweet mercy's sake
Another Hour to me


...

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