STRAY POEMS

This page is specially prepared for stray poems. You can reach newest and popular stray poems from this page. You can vote and comment on the stray poems you read.

Address To The Devil

O Prince, O chief of many throned pow'rs!
That led th' embattled seraphim to war!
(Milton, Paradise Lost)

.....
Robert Burns

Robert Burns
A Dedication

My new-cut ashlar takes the light
Where crimson-blank the windows flare;
By my own work, before the night,
Great Overseer, I make my prayer.
.....
Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
Afflictions Sanctified By The Word

Oh how I love Thy holy Word,
Thy gracious covenant, O Lord!
It guides me in the peaceful way;
I think upon it all the day.
.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
In Memory Of My Mother

I do not think of you lying in the wet clay
Of a Monaghan graveyard; I see
You walking down a lane among the poplars
On your way to the station, or happily
.....

Patrick Kavanagh
Remembrances

Summer pleasures they are gone like to visions every one
And the cloudy days of autumn and of winter cometh on
I tried to call them back but unbidden they are gone
Far away from heart and eye and for ever far away
.....
John Clare

John Clare
In The Garden

Aylmer's Garden, near the Lake. LAURENCE RABY and ESTELLE.

He:
Come to the bank where the boat is moor'd to the willow-tree low;
.....
Adam Lindsay Gordon

Adam Lindsay Gordon
White Horses

Where run your colts at pasture?
Where hide your mares to breed?
'Mid bergs about the Ice-cap
Or wove Sargasso weed;
.....
Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
Waring

I

What's become of Waring
Since he gave us all the slip,
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
The Mountain

The mountain held the town as in a shadow
I saw so much before I slept there once:
I noticed that I missed stars in the west,
Where its black body cut into the sky.
.....
Robert Frost

Robert Frost
Venus And Adonis

Even as the sun with purple-coloured face
Had ta'en his last leave of the weeping morn,
Rose-cheeked Adonis hied him to the chase;
Hunting he loved, but love he laughed to scorn.
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
The Female Exile

Written at Brighthelmstone in Nov. 1792.
NOVEMBER'S chill blast on the rough beach is howling,
The surge breaks afar, and then foams to the shore,
Dark clouds o'er the sea gather heavy and scowling,
.....

Charlotte Smith
Elegy Iv. Ophilia's Urn. To Mr. Graves

Through the dim veil of evening's dusky shade,
Near some lone fane, or yew's funereal green,
What dreary forms has magic Fear survey'd!
What shrouded spectres Superstition seen!
.....

William Shenstone
Elegy Xix. - Written In Spring, 1743

Again the labouring hind inverts the soil;
Again the merchant ploughs the tumid wave;
Another spring renews the soldier's toil,
And finds me vacant in the rural cave.
.....

William Shenstone
Endymion: Book I

ENDYMION.

A Poetic Romance.

.....
John Keats

John Keats
Tiare Tahiti

Mamua, when our laughter ends,
And hearts and bodies, brown as white,
Are dust about the doors of friends,
Or scent ablowing down the night,
.....
Rupert Brooke

Rupert Brooke
Mazelli: Canto Iii

I.

With plumes to which the dewdrops cling,
Wide waves the morn her golden wing;
.....

George W. Sands
Hymn Xxi: Ye Simple Souls That Stray

Ye simple souls that stray
Far from the path of peace,
That lonely, unfrequented way
To life and happiness,
.....

John Wesley
Godspeed

Outbound, your bark awaits you. Were I one
Whose prayer availeth much, my wish should be
Your favoring trad-wind and consenting sea.
By sail or steed was never love outrun,
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
Daily Prayer

As I live this day,
Leave me not alone, lest I stray
But guide my steps into the right way
Let your light shine in my path
.....
Cliff Kawerani

Cliff Kawerani
Walking With God

By faith in Christ I walk with God,
With heav'n, my journeys'-end, in view;
Supported by his staff and rod,
My road is safe and pleasant too,
.....

John Newton
The Teacher's Lesson

I saw a child some four years old,
Along a meadow stray;
Alone she went-unchecked-untold-
Her home not far away.
.....

Sam G. Goodrich
Rudiger

Bright on the mountain's heathy slope
The day's last splendors shine
And rich with many a radiant hue
Gleam gayly on the Rhine.
.....
Robert Southey

Robert Southey
A Modest Request

Complied With After The Dinner At President Everett's Inauguration

Scene, - a back parlor in a certain square,
Or court, or lane, - in short, no matter where;
.....

Oliver Wendell Holmes
Memorials Of A Tour In Italy, 1837 - Xv. - At The Convent Of Camaldoli

Grieve for the Man who hither came bereft,
And seeking consolation from above;
Nor grieve the less that skill to him was left
To paint this picture of his lady-love:
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Gentle Gardener

I'd like to leave but daffodills
to mark my little way,
To leave but tulips red and white
behind me as I stray;
.....
Edgar Albert Guest

Edgar Albert Guest
Nature's Lesson

We traveled by a mountain's edge,
It was September calm and bright,
Nature had decked its rocky ledge
With flowers of varied hue and height.
.....

Nannie R. Glass
Endymion: Book Iv

Muse of my native land! loftiest Muse!
O first-born on the mountains! by the hues
Of heaven on the spiritual air begot:
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot,
.....
John Keats

John Keats
Near Perigord

I
You'd have men's hearts up from the dust
And tell their secrets, Messire Cino,
Rigkt enough? Then read between the lines of Uc St. Circ,
.....
Ezra Pound

Ezra Pound
One Day

Today I have been happy. All the day
I held the memory of you, and wove
Its laughter with the dancing light o' the spray,
And sowed the sky with tiny clouds of love,
.....
Rupert Brooke

Rupert Brooke
Love Among The Ruins

I

Where the quiet-coloured end of evening smiles
Miles and miles
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
World Strangeness

Strange the world about me lies,
Never yet familiar grown-
Still disturbs me with surprise,
Haunts me like a face half known.
.....

William Watson
The Book Of Memory

Turn me loose and let me be
Young once more and fancy free;
Let me wander where I will,
Down the lane and up the hill,
.....
Edgar Albert Guest

Edgar Albert Guest
All Alone

I.

Ah! wherefore by the Church-yard side,
Poor little LORN ONE, dost thou stray?
.....

Mary Darby Robinson
Heliograph

(Self-Portrait) Omens and Astrology. A desert flat and undisturbed, stupid and forlorn. Sunless. a caravan of failures. Pons Asinorum and the Feast of the Ass and revolt against standardized American childhood.
War and Violence.
Catapults and Torches and the first stray thrusts of Sun into the Soul. Bombardments and Bordels. Heraldry and High Walls. Too rigid to crumble but not too strong to fracture.

.....

Harry Crosby
Out Of The East

When man first walked upright and soberly
Reflecting as he paced to and fro,
And no more swinging from wide tree to tree,
Or sheltered by vast boles from sheltered foe,
.....

John Freeman
At Evening's Hush

Now pipe no more, glad Shepherd,
Your joys from this fair hill
Through golden eves and still:
There sounds from yon dense quarry
.....

John Frederick Freeman
Sketches In The Exhibition

What various objects strike with various force,
Achilles, Hebe, and Sir Watkin's horse!
Here summer scenes, there Pentland's stormy ridge,
Lords, ladies, Noah's ark, and Cranford bridge!
.....

William Lisle Bowles
Mogg Megone - Part Iii.

Ah! weary Priest! - with pale hands pressed
On thy throbbing brow of pain,
Baffled in thy life-long quest,
Overworn with toiling vain,
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
The Church Of Brou

I
THE CASTLE

Down the Savoy valleys sounding,
.....
Matthew Arnold

Matthew Arnold
Lycabas

A name of the Year. Some say the word means a march of wolves,
which wolves, running in single file, are the Months of the Year.
Others say the word means the path of the light.

.....
George Macdonald

George Macdonald
Comus

A Masque Presented At Ludlow Castle, 1634, Before

The Earl Of Bridgewater, Then President Of Wales.

.....
John Milton

John Milton
The Change

Love in her Sunny Eyes does basking play;
Love walks the pleasant Mazes of her Hair;
Love does on both her Lips for ever stray;
And sows and reaps a thousand kisses there.
.....
Abraham Cowley

Abraham Cowley
An Essay On Man: Epistle I.

THE DESIGN.

Having proposed to write some pieces on human life and manners, such as (to use my Lord Bacon's expression) come home to men's business and bosoms, I thought it more satisfactory to begin with considering man in the abstract, his nature and his state; since, to prove any moral duty, to enforce any moral precept, or to examine the perfection or imperfection of any creature whatsoever, it is necessary first to know what condition and relation it is placed in, and what is the proper end and purpose of its being.

.....
Alexander Pope

Alexander Pope
Marmion: Canto Iii. - The Inn

I.

The livelong day Lord Marmion rode:
The mountain path the Palmer showed,
.....

Walter Scott (sir)
Satire Iii

Kind pity chokes my spleen; brave scorn forbids
Those tears to issue which swell my eyelids;
I must not laugh, nor weep sins and be wise;
Can railing, then, cure these worn maladies?
.....
John Donne

John Donne
Christmas Eve

I

Out of the little chapel I burst
Into the fresh night-air again.
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Thanksgiving

The Autumn hills are golden at the top,
And rounded as a poet's silver rhyme;
The mellow days are ruby ripe, that drop
One after one into the lap of time.
.....

Kate Seymour Maclean
Windsor Forest

Thy forests, Windsor! and thy green retreats,
At once the Monarch's and the Muse's seats,
Invite my lays. Be present, sylvan maids!
Unlock your springs, and open all your shades.
.....
Alexander Pope

Alexander Pope
The Adieu. Written Under The Impression That The Author Would Soon Die.

1.

Adieu, thou Hill! [1] where early joy
Spread roses o'er my brow;
.....

George Gordon Byron
Item

ITEM.

Ictu non potuit primo Cato solvere vitam;
Defecit tanto vulnere victa manus:
.....
Richard Lovelace

Richard Lovelace