OVERCAME POEMS

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Snake

A snake came to my water-trough
On a hot, hot day, and I in pyjamas for the heat,
To drink there.
In the deep, strange-scented shade of the great dark carob-tree
.....
D. H. Lawrence

D. H. Lawrence
Sonnet 26 - I Lived With Visions For My Company

XXVI

I lived with visions for my company
Instead of men and women, years ago,
.....
Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Barrett Browning
The Iliad: Book 23

Thus did they make their moan throughout the city, while the
Achaeans when they reached the Hellespont went back every man to his
own ship. But Achilles would not let the Myrmidons go, and spoke to
his brave comrades saying, “Myrmidons, famed horsemen and my own
.....

Homer
Hyperion: Book Ii

Just at the self-same beat of Time's wide wings
Hyperion slid into the rustled air,
And Saturn gain'd with Thea that sad place
Where Cybele and the bruised Titans mourn'd.
.....
John Keats

John Keats
Calthon And Colmal

This piece, as many more of Ossian's compositions, is addressed to one of the first Christian missionaries. The story of the poem is handed down by tradition thus:- In the country of the Britons, between the walls, two chiefs lived in the days of Fingal, Dunthalmo, Lord of Teutha, supposed to be the Tweed; and Rathmor, who dwelt at Clutha, well known to be the river Clyde. Rathmor was not more renowned for his generosity and hospitality, than Dunthalmo was infamous for his cruelty and ambition. Dunthalmo, through envy, or on account of some private feuds, which subsisted between the families, murdered Rathmor at a feast; but being afterward touched with remorse, he educated the two sons of Rathmor, Calthon and Colmar, in his own house. They growing up to man's estate, dropped some hints that they intended to revenge the death of their father, upon which Dunthalmo shut them up in two caves, on the banks of Teutha, intending to take them off privately. Colmal, the daughter of Dunthalmo, who was secretly in love with Calthon, helped him to make his escape from prison, and hied with him to Fingal, disguised in the habit of a young warrior, and implored his aid against Dunthalmo. Fingal sent Ossian with three hundred men to Colmar's relief. Dunthalmo, having previously murdered Colmar, came to a battle with Ossian, but he was killed by that hero, and his army totally defeated. Calthon married Colmal his deliverer; and Ossian returned to Morven.

Pleasant is the voice of thy song, thou lonely dweller of the rock! It comes on the sound of the stream, along the narrow vale. My soul awakes, O stranger, in the midst of my hall. I stretch my hand to the spear, as in the days of other years. I stretch my hand, but it is feeble: and the sigh of my bosom grows. Wilt thou not listen, son of the rock! to the song of Ossian? My soul is full of other times; the joy of my youth returns. Thus the sun appears in the west, after the steps of his brightness have moved behind a storm: the green hills lift their dewy heads: the blue streams rejoice in the vale. The aged hero comes forth on his stair; his gray hair glitters in the beam. Dost thou not behold, son of the rock! a shield in Ossian's hall? It is marked with the strokes of battle; and the brightness of its bosses has failed. That shield the great Dunthalmo bore, the chief of streamy Teutha. Dunthalmo bore it in battle before he fell by Ossian's spear. Listen, son of the rock! to the tale of other years.

.....

James Macpherson
Hawker, The Standard Bearer

The grey gull sat on a floating whale,
On a floating whale sat he,
And he told his tale of the storm and the gale,
And the ships that he saw with steam and sail,
.....

Banjo Paterson
Godiva

I waited for the train at Coventry;
I hung with grooms and porters on the bridge,
To match the three tall spires; and there I shaped
The city's ancient legend into this:--
.....
Alfred Lord Tennyson

Alfred Lord Tennyson
The Dream Of Man

To the eye and the ear of the Dreamer
This Dream out of darkness flew,
Through the horn or the ivory portal,
But he wist not which of the two.
.....

William Watson
Fingal - Book Vi

ARGUMENT.

Night comes on. Fingal gives a feast to his army, at which Swaran is present. The king commands Ullin his bard to give "the song of peace;" a custom always observed at the end of a war. Ullin relates the actions of Trenmor, great-grandfather to Fingal, in Scandinavia, and his marriage with Inibaca, the daughter of a king of Lochlin, who was ancestor to Swaran; which consideration, together with his being brother to Agandecca, with whom Fingal was in love in his youth, induced the king to release him, and permit him to return with the remains of his army into Lochlin, upon his promise of never returning to Ireland in a hostile manner. The night is spent in settling Swaran's departure, in songs of bards, and in a conversation in which the story of Grumal is introduced by Fingal. Morning comes. Swaran departs. Fingal goes on a hunting party, and finding Cuthullin in the cave of Tura, comforts him, and sets sail the next day for Scotland, which concludes the poem.

.....

James Macpherson
Edward The Confessor

Here Edward king, lord of the English,
sent his soul strong in truth to Christ,
in God's safekeeping, his holy spirit,
He in this world dwelt for a time
.....

Anonymous Olde English
The Legend Of Sir Guy

A pleasant song of the valiant deeds of chivalry atchieved by that noble knight Sir Guy of Warwick, who, for the love of fair Phelis, became a hermit, and died in a cave of craggy rocke, a mile distant from Warwick.

Was ever knight for ladyes sake
Soe tost in love, as I, Sir Guy,
.....

Anonymous Olde English
The Warrior's Return

Sir Walter returned from the far Holy Land,
And a blood-tinctured falchion he bore;
But such precious blood as now darkened his sword
Had never distained it before.
.....

Amelia Opie
Little Popeet - The Lost Child

Near by the silent waters of the Mediterranean,
And at the door of an old hut stood a coloured man,
Whose dress was oriental in style and poor with wear,
While adown his furrowed cheeks ran many a tear.
.....

William Topaz Mcgonagall
Paradise Regained

THE FIRST BOOK

I, WHO erewhile the happy Garden sung
By one man's disobedience lost, now sing
.....
John Milton

John Milton
Prisoner

`Prisoner, tell me, who was it that bound you?'

`It was my master,' said the prisoner.
`I thought I could outdo everybody in the world in wealth and power,
.....

Rabindranath Tagore
Life In The Woods

Lines on the struggles of the early settlers.

Canada hath wealthy yeoman
Whose fathers overcame the foeman ;
.....

James Mcintyre
The Story Of Sigurd The Volsung (excerpt)

But therewith the sun rose upward and lightened all the earth,
And the light flashed up to the heavens from the rims of the glorious girth;
But they twain arose together, and with both her palms outspread,
And bathed in the light returning, she cried aloud and said:
.....
William Morris

William Morris
Mountain Drinking Song

To drown the ancient sorrows,
we drank a hundred jugs of wine
there in the beautiful night.
We couldn't go to bed with the moon so bright.
.....

Li Po
Metamorphosis Viii, 611-724

Baucis and Philemon

THUS Achelous ends: his audience hear
With admiration, and admiring, fear
.....
Ovid

Ovid
Lines On Mt. Elgin

Delivered at opening of Odd-Fellows' Lodge.

Dereham now hath wealthy yoemen
Whose fathers overcame the foemen ;
.....

James Mcintyre
The Romance Of The Water Lily

While Merlin paced the Cornish sands,
Forth-looking toward the rocks of Scilly,
The pleased Enchanter was aware
Of a bright Ship that seemed to hang in air,
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Ch 02 The Morals Of Dervishes Story 20

Despite the abundant admonitions of the most illustrious Sheikh Abulfaraj Ben Juzi to shun musical entertainments and to prefer solitude and retirement, the budding of my youth overcame me, my sensual desires were excited so that, unable to resist them, I walked some steps contrary to the opinion of my tutor, enjoying myself in musical amusements and convivial meetings. When the advice of my sheikh occurred to my mind, I said:

â??If the qazi were sitting with us, he would clap his hands.
If the muhtasib were bibbing wine, he would excuse a drunkard.â??
.....

Saadi Shirazi
Xxvi

I lived with visions for my company
Instead of men and women, years ago,
And found them gentle mates, nor thought to know
A sweefer music than they played to me.
.....
Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Sonnet 102: Wher Be Those Roses Gone

Where be those roses gone, which sweeten'd so our eyes?
Where those red cheeks, which oft with fair increase did frame
The height of honor in the kindly badge of shame?
Who hath the crimson weeds stol'n from my morning skies?
.....
Sir Philip Sidney

Sir Philip Sidney
Akbar's Dream

AN INSCRIPTION BY ABUL FAZL FOR A TEMPLE IN KASHMIR (Blochmann xxxii.)



.....
Alfred Lord Tennyson

Alfred Lord Tennyson
A Hymn To God The Father

Hear me, O God!
A broken heart
Is my best part.
Use still thy rod,
.....
Ben Jonson

Ben Jonson
Hawker, The Standard Bearer

The grey gull sat on a floating whale,
On a floating whale sat he,
And he told his tale of the storm and the gale,
And the ships that he saw with steam and sail,
.....

Banjo Paterson (andrew Barton)
Philip Of Pokanoket - An Indian Memoir - Prose

As monumental bronze unchanged his look:
A soul that pity touch'd, but never shook;
Train'd from his tree-rock'd cradle to his bier,
The fierce extremes of good and ill to brook
.....

Washington Irving
Sonnets From The Portuguese Xxvi

I lived with visions for my company
Instead of men and women, years ago,
And found them gentle mates, nor thought to know
A sweeter music than they played to me.
.....
Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Tristram Of Lyonesse - Ii - The Queen's Pleasance

Out of the night arose the second day,
And saw the ship's bows break the shoreward spray.
As the sun's boat of gold and fire began
To sail the sea of heaven unsailed of man,
.....
Algernon Charles Swinburne

Algernon Charles Swinburne
Sir William Gomm - Sonnets

I.

At threescore years and five aroused anew
To rule in India, forth a soldier went
.....
Algernon Charles Swinburne

Algernon Charles Swinburne
Thalassius

Upon the flowery forefront of the year,
One wandering by the grey-green April sea
Found on a reach of shingle and shallower sand
Inlaid with starrier glimmering jewellery
.....
Algernon Charles Swinburne

Algernon Charles Swinburne
Three Faces Ii. Genoa

Again the same strange might of eyes, that saw
In heaven and earth nought fairer, overcame
My sight with rapture of reiterate awe,
Again the same.
.....
Algernon Charles Swinburne

Algernon Charles Swinburne
Paradise Regained - The First Book

I who e're while the happy Garden sung,
By one mans disobedience lost, now sing
Recover'd Paradise to all mankind,
By one mans firm obedience fully tri'd
.....
John Milton

John Milton
The Divine Comedy By Dante: The Vision Of Paradise: Canto Xxx

Noon's fervid hour perchance six thousand miles
From hence is distant; and the shadowy cone
Almost to level on our earth declines;
When from the midmost of this blue abyss
.....

Dante Alighieri
On Sr Charles Porter The Chancellours Death

& tis too true alass! we find, he's gonn,
Virtue from earth a second time is flown,
She onely then with her two sisters flew,
But now since he, what ere were good withdrew;
.....
Thomas Parnell

Thomas Parnell
The Egyptian Maid

While Merlin paced the Cornish sands,
Forth-looking toward the rocks of Scilly,
The pleased Enchanter was aware
Of a bright Ship that seemed to hang in air,
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Of Tribulation, These Are They

325

Of Tribulation, these are They,
Denoted by the White-
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Paradise Regained: The First Book

I, who erewhile the happy Garden sung
By one man's disobedience lost, now sing
Recovered Paradise to all mankind,
By one man's firm obedience fully tried
.....
John Milton

John Milton
Thomas Ross, Jr.

This I saw with my own eyes:
A cliff-swallow
Made her nest in a hole of the high clay-bank
There near Miller's Ford.
.....
Edgar Lee Masters

Edgar Lee Masters
Within And Without: A Dramatic Poem: Part I

Go thou into thy closet; shut thy door;
And pray to Him in secret: He will hear.
But think not thou, by one wild bound, to clear
The numberless ascensions, more and more,
.....
George Macdonald

George Macdonald
Within And Without: A Dramatic Poem: Part Iii

And weep not, though the Beautiful decay
Within thy heart, as daily in thine eyes;
Thy heart must have its autumn, its pale skies,
Leading, mayhap, to winter's dim dismay.
.....
George Macdonald

George Macdonald
The Suicide

What anguish rankled 'neath that silent breast?
What spectral figures mocked those staring eyes,
Luring them on to Stygian mysteries?
What overpowering sense of grief distressed?
.....

Alfred Castner King
Vidrik Verlandson (from The Old Danish)

King Diderik sits in the halls of Bern,
And he boasts of his deeds of might;
So many a swain in battle he's fell'd,
And taken so many a knight.
.....
George Borrow

George Borrow
The Countersign

Alas! the weary hours pass slow,
The night is very dark and still;
And in the marshes far below
I hear the bearded whippoorwill;
.....

Anonymous Americas
From The Persian Of Hafiz I

Butler, fetch the ruby wine,
Which with sudden greatness fills us;
Pour for me who in my spirit
Fail in courage and performance;
.....
Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ch 03 On The Excellence Of Contentment Story 24

A weak fisherman caught a strong fish in his net and not being able to retain it the fish overcame him and pulled the net from his hand.

A boy went to bring water from the torrent.
The torrent came and took the boy away.
.....

Saadi Shirazi
A Ballad

With A Serious Conclusion

Crowd about me, little children--
Come and cluster 'round my knee
.....

James Whitcomb Riley
Man Of The House

It was a misunderstanding.
I got into bed, made love
with the woman I found there,
called her honey, mowed the lawn,
.....

Bob Hicok
Sir William Gomm: Sonnets

I.
AT threescore years and five aroused anew
To rule in India, forth a soldier went
On whose bright-fronted youth fierce war had spent
.....
Algernon Charles Swinburne

Algernon Charles Swinburne