AMBER POEMS

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Early Autumn

With half-hearted levies of frost that make foray,
retire, and refrain-
Ambiguous bugles that blow and that falter to
silence again-
.....
Don Marquis

Don Marquis
Endymion: Book I

ENDYMION.

A Poetic Romance.

.....
John Keats

John Keats
Bob White

I see you, on the zigzag rails,
You cheery little fellow!
While purple leaves are whirling down,
And scarlet, brown, and yellow.
.....

George Cooper
She Sweeps With Many-colored Brooms,

She sweeps with many-colored brooms,
And leaves the shreds behind;
Oh, housewife in the evening west,
Come back, and dust the pond!
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Rain

Suddenly this defeat.
This rain.
The blues gone gray
And the browns gone gray
.....

Jack Gilbert
Miners

There was a whispering in my hearth,
A sigh of the coal.
Grown wistful of a former earth
It might recall.
.....
Wilfred Owen

Wilfred Owen
The Wizard Way

[Dedicated to General J.C.F. Fuller]

Velvet soft the night-star glowed
Over the untrodden road,
.....
Aleister Crowley

Aleister Crowley
Delight Becomes Pictorial

Delight becomes pictorial
When viewed through pain,--
More fair, because impossible
That any gain.
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
A Meditation For His Mistress

You are a tulip seen to-day,
But, dearest, of so short a stay
That where you grew scarce man can say.

.....

Robert Herrick
The Man With The Blue Guitar

as green.

They said, 'You have a blue guitar,
You do not play things as they are.'
.....

Wallace Stevens
To Live Merrily, And To Trust To Good Verses

Now is the time for mirth,
Nor cheek or tongue be dumb;
For with the flow'ry earth
The golden pomp is come.
.....

Robert Herrick
Endymion: Book Iii

There are who lord it o'er their fellow-men
With most prevailing tinsel: who unpen
Their baaing vanities, to browse away
The comfortable green and juicy hay
.....
John Keats

John Keats
Sonnet Lxxxi: Rest With Your Dream Inside My Dream

Already, you are mine. Rest with your dream inside my dream.
Love, grief, labour, must sleep now.
Night revolves on invisible wheels
and joined to me you are pure as sleeping amber.
.....
Pablo Neruda

Pablo Neruda
The Message

To you, my comrades, whether far or near,
I send this message. Let our past revive;
Come, sound reveille to our hearts once more.
Expecting, I shall wait till at my door
.....
Elizabeth Stoddard

Elizabeth Stoddard
A Song Of The Degrees

I
Rest me with Chinese colours,
For I think the glass is evil.

.....
Ezra Pound

Ezra Pound
Nightingales, A Sigh, A Whisper

Nightingales, a sigh, a whisper
In a shady nook
And the lullaby in silver
Of a lazy brook.
.....

Afanasy Afanasyevich Fet
Mar. Lib. Iv. Ep. 33.

MAR. LIB. IV. EP. 33.

Et latet et lucet, Phaetontide condita gutta
Ut videatur apis nectare clausa suo.
.....
Richard Lovelace

Richard Lovelace
Annuitant

Oh I am neither rich nor poor,
No worker I dispoil;
Yet I am glad to be secure
From servitude and toil.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
Sonnets To The Sundry Notes Of Music

I.
IT was a lording's daughter, the fairest one of three,
That liked of her master as well as well might be,
Till looking on an Englishman, the fair'st that eye could see,
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
The City Of The Soul: Ii

What shall we do, my soul, to please the King?
Seeing he hath no pleasure in the dance,
And hath condemned the honeyed utterance
Of silver flutes and mouths made round to sing.
.....

Lord Alfred Douglas
Endymion: Book Iv

Muse of my native land! loftiest Muse!
O first-born on the mountains! by the hues
Of heaven on the spiritual air begot:
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot,
.....
John Keats

John Keats
He Is Alive, This Morning'

1160

He is alive, this morning-
He is alive-and awake-
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Flapper

Love has crept out of her sealéd heart
As a field-bee, black and amber,
Breaks from the winter-cell, to clamber
Up the warm grass where the sunbeams start.
.....
D. H. Lawrence

D. H. Lawrence
Our Hero

“Flowers, only flowers-bring me dainty posies,
Blossoms for forgetfulness,” that was all he said;
So we sacked our gardens, violets and roses,
Lilies white and bluebells laid we on his bed.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
My Favoured Fare

Some poets sing of scenery;
Some to fair maids make sonnets sweet.
A fig for love and greenery,
Be mine a song of things to eat.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
November Skies

Than these November skies
Is no sky lovelier. The clouds are deep;
Into their gray the subtle spies
Of colour creep,
.....

John Freeman
In Memoriam-rev. J. J. Lyons

ROSH-HASHANAH, 5638.

The golden harvest-tide is here, the corn
Bows its proud tops beneath the reaper's hand.
.....
Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus
An Ode Of The Birth Of Our Savior

In numbers, and but these few,
I sing Thy birth, Oh, Jesu!
Thou pretty Baby, born here,
With sup'rabundant scorn here:
.....

Robert Herrick
The King Of Ys

Wild across the Breton country,
Fabled centuries ago,
Riding from the black sea border,
Came the squadrons of the snow.
.....
Bliss Carman

Bliss Carman
A Something In A Summer's Day

122

A something in a summer's Day
As slow her flambeaux burn away
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Amber

Hover
the imagined center, our tongues
grew long to please it, licking

.....

Nick Flynn
America The Beautiful

O beautiful for spacious skies,
For amber waves of grain,
For purple mountain majesties
Above the fruited plain!
.....

Katharine Lee Bates
The Wanderer

To see the clouds his spirit yearned toward so
Over new mountains piled and unploughed waves,
Back of old-storied spires and architraves
To watch Arcturus rise or Fomalhaut,
.....
Alan Seeger

Alan Seeger
Tithonus

So when the verdure of his life was shed,
With all the grace of ripened manlihead,
And on his locks, but now so lovable,
Old age like desolating winter fell,
.....
Alan Seeger

Alan Seeger
The Old Gentleman With The Amber Snuff-box

_The old gentleman, tapping his amber snuff-box
(A heart-shaped snuff-box with a golden clasp)
Stared at the dying fire. 'I'd like them all
To understand, when I am gone,' he muttered.
.....
Alfred Noyes

Alfred Noyes
Lachrymæ Musarum

Low, like another's, lies the laurelled head:
The life that seemed a perfect song is o'er:
Carry the last great bard to his last bed.
Land that he loved, thy noblest voice is mute.
.....

William Watson
England

Shoulders of upland brown laid dark to the sunset's bosom,
Living amber of wheat, and copper of new-ploughed loam,
Downs where the white sheep wander, little gardens in blossom,
Roads that wind through the twilight up to the lights of home.
.....
Edith Nesbit

Edith Nesbit
Panthea

Nay, let us walk from fire unto fire,
From passionate pain to deadlier delight,-
I am too young to live without desire,
Too young art thou to waste this summer night
.....
Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde
Adonis

1.

Each of us like you
has died once,
.....

Hilda Doolittle
The Grief Of A Girl's Heart

O Donall og, if you go across the sea, bring myself with you and do not forget it; and you will have a sweetheart for fair days and market days, and the daughter of the King of Greece beside you at night. It is late last night the dog was speaking of you; the snipe was speaking of you in her deep marsh. It is you are the lonely bird through the woods; and that you may be without a mate until you find me.

You promised me, and you said a lie to me, that you would be before me where the sheep are flocked; I gave a whistle and three hundred cries to you, and I found nothing there but a bleating lamb.

.....

Isabella Augusta, Lady Gregory
Comus

A Masque Presented At Ludlow Castle, 1634, Before

The Earl Of Bridgewater, Then President Of Wales.

.....
John Milton

John Milton
A Hidden Life

Proudly the youth, sudden with manhood crowned,
Went walking by his horses, the first time,
That morning, to the plough. No soldier gay
Feels at his side the throb of the gold hilt
.....
George Macdonald

George Macdonald
Before I Got My Eye Put Out

327

Before I got my eye put out
I liked as well to see-
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Windsor Forest

Thy forests, Windsor! and thy green retreats,
At once the Monarch's and the Muse's seats,
Invite my lays. Be present, sylvan maids!
Unlock your springs, and open all your shades.
.....
Alexander Pope

Alexander Pope
The Guest House

What imps are these that come with scowl and leer?
Black motes upon the morning's amber beam,
They crowd and float about each happy dream
And blow upon pure joy the taint of fear.
.....

John Le Gay Brereton
Privacy

Oh you who are shy of the popular eye,
(Though most of us seek to survive it)
Just think of the goldfish who wanted to die
Because she could never be private.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
My Garden

Sweet garden, wreathed in fruits and flowers,
And domed by blue Tyrolean skies,
Within thy rose-encircled bowers,
Secluded from all curious eyes,
.....
John L. Stoddard

John L. Stoddard
The Wind

ACROSS the barren moors the wild, wild wind
Went sweeping on, and with his sobs and shrieks
Filled the still night, and tore the woof of clouds
Through which the moon did shed her cold clear light.
.....

Mathilde Blind
The Forsaken Merman

Come, dear children, let us away;
Down and away below!
Now my brothers call from the bay,
Now the great winds shoreward blow,
.....
Matthew Arnold

Matthew Arnold
Enough

Did he forget? . . . I do not remember,
All I had of him once I still have to-day;
He was lovely to me as the word, 'amber,'
As the taste of honey and the smell of hay.
.....

Muriel Stuart