OBLIVION POEMS

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A Faded Boy'in Sallow Clothes

1524

A faded Boy-in sallow Clothes
Who drove a lonesome Cow
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
It Became Our Story

Like a fable that never left the table were the
Words of the prophet
Swiftly, slowly, it became our story.

.....
Gerald Onyebuchi

Gerald Onyebuchi
This Land Is Not For Sale.

This house is not for sale-
beware of my kitchened wife,
beware of Emeka, my son
& Tobi, my Son-in-law;
.....
John Chizoba Vincent

John Chizoba Vincent
A Cabbage Patch

Folk ask if I'm alive,
Most think I'm not;
Yet gaily I contrive
To till my plot.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
Venus And Adonis

Even as the sun with purple-coloured face
Had ta'en his last leave of the weeping morn,
Rose-cheeked Adonis hied him to the chase;
Hunting he loved, but love he laughed to scorn.
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
The Royal Tombs Of Golconda

I MUSE among these silent fanes
Whose spacious darkness guards your dust;
Around me sleep the hoary plains
That hold your ancient wars in trust.
.....

Sarojini Naidu
In The Sound Of Mull

Tradition, be thou mute! Oblivion, throw
Thy veil in mercy o'er the records, hung
Round strath and mountain, stamped by the ancient tongue
On rock and ruin darkening as we go,
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Endymion: Book I

ENDYMION.

A Poetic Romance.

.....
John Keats

John Keats
Heredity

I am the family face;
Flesh perishes, I live on,
Projecting trait and trace
Through time to times anon,
.....
Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy
Letter To Maria Gisborne

The spider spreads her webs, whether she be
In poet's tower, cellar, or barn, or tree;
The silk-worm in the dark green mulberry leaves
His winding sheet and cradle ever weaves;
.....
Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley
Absalom And Achitophel

In pious times, ere priest-craft did begin,
Before polygamy was made a sin;
When man, on many, multipli'd his kind,
Ere one to one was cursedly confin'd:
.....
John Dryden

John Dryden
Adonais

I weep for Adonais-he is dead!
O, weep for Adonais! though our tears
Thaw not the frost which binds so dear a head!
And thou, sad Hour, selected from all years
.....
Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley
The Man Against The Sky

Between me and the sunset, like a dome
Against the glory of a world on fire,
Now burned a sudden hill,
Bleak, round, and high, by flame-lit height made higher,
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
The Sonnets Cxxii - Thy Gift, Thy Tables, Are Within My Brain

Thy gift, thy tables, are within my brain
Full character'd with lasting memory,
Which shall above that idle rank remain,
Beyond all date; even to eternity:
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
So Let Them Pass, These Songs Of Mine

So let them pass, these songs of mine,
Into oblivion, nor repine;
Abandoned ruins of large schemes,
Dimmed lights adrift from nobler dreams,
.....
Don Marquis

Don Marquis
Endymion: Book Iv

Muse of my native land! loftiest Muse!
O first-born on the mountains! by the hues
Of heaven on the spiritual air begot:
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot,
.....
John Keats

John Keats
Spleen

I was not sorrowful, I could not weep,
And all my memories were put to sleep.

I watched the river grow more white and strange,
.....
Ernest Dowson

Ernest Dowson
Contemplations

Sometime now past in the Autumnal Tide,
When Phœbus wanted but one hour to bed,
The trees all richly clad, yet void of pride,
Were gilded o're by his rich golden head.
.....

Anne Bradstreet
Endymion: Book Iii

There are who lord it o'er their fellow-men
With most prevailing tinsel: who unpen
Their baaing vanities, to browse away
The comfortable green and juicy hay
.....
John Keats

John Keats
Ode To Silence

Aye, but she?
Your other sister and my other soul
Grave Silence, lovelier
Than the three loveliest maidens, what of her?
.....
Edna St. Vincent Millay

Edna St. Vincent Millay
Lines To My Father

The many sow, but only the chosen reap;
Happy the wretched host if Day be brief,
That with the cool oblivion of sleep
A dawnless Night may soothe the smart of grief.
.....

Countee Cullen
Despair

No rest-not one day in the seven for me?
Not one, from the maddening yoke to be free?
Not one to escape from the boss on the prowl,
His sinister glance and his furious growl,
.....

Morris Rosenfeld
Ode On Venice

I.
Oh Venice! Venice! when thy marble walls
Are level with the waters, there shall be
A cry of nations o'er thy sunken halls,
.....

George Gordon Byron
Humanitad

It is full winter now: the trees are bare,
Save where the cattle huddle from the cold
Beneath the pine, for it doth never wear
The autumn's gaudy livery whose gold
.....
Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde
The Adieu. Written Under The Impression That The Author Would Soon Die.

1.

Adieu, thou Hill! [1] where early joy
Spread roses o'er my brow;
.....

George Gordon Byron
Windsor Forest

Thy forests, Windsor! and thy green retreats,
At once the Monarch's and the Muse's seats,
Invite my lays. Be present, sylvan maids!
Unlock your springs, and open all your shades.
.....
Alexander Pope

Alexander Pope
Past Ruin'd Ilion Helen Lives,

Past ruin'd Ilion Helen lives,
Alcestis rises from the shades;
Verse calls them forth; 'tis verse that gives
Immortal youth to mortal maids.
.....
Walter Savage Landor

Walter Savage Landor
The Streets

Marlboro' and Waterloo and Trafalgar,
Tuileries, Talavera, Valenciennes,
Were strange names all, and all familiar;

.....

John Frederick Freeman
The Ship Of Death

I

Now it is autumn and the falling fruit
and the long journey towards oblivion.
.....

David Herbert Lawrence
The Deserted Village

Sweet Auburn! loveliest village of the plain,
Where health and plenty cheered the labouring swain,
Where smiling spring its earliest visits paid,
And parting summer's lingering blooms delayed:
.....
Oliver Goldsmith

Oliver Goldsmith
Hyperion: Book Ii

Just at the self-same beat of Time's wide wings
Hyperion slid into the rustled air,
And Saturn gain'd with Thea that sad place
Where Cybele and the bruised Titans mourn'd.
.....
John Keats

John Keats
Reason Says Love Says

Reason says, â?? I will beguile him with the tongue.â?; Love says,
â??Be silent. I will beguile him with the soul.â?
The soul says to the heart, â??Go, do not laugh at me and yourself.
What is there that is not his, that I may beguile him
.....

Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi
Gone

Upon time's surging, billowy sea
A ship now slowly disappears,
With freight no human eye can see,
But weighing just one hundred years.
.....

Nannie R. Glass
The Ditch Is Dear To The Drunken Man

1645

The Ditch is dear to the Drunken man
For is it not his Bed-
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Euthanasia

When Time, or soon or late, shall bring
The dreamless sleep that lulls the dead,
Oblivion! may thy languid wing
Wave gently o'er my dying bed!
.....

George Gordon Byron
Last Man, The

All worldly shapes shall melt in gloom,
The Sun himself must die,
Before this mortal shall assume
Its Immortality!
.....

Thomas Campbell
Everyday Characters V - Portrait Of A Lady

IN THE EXHIBITION OP THE ROYAL
ACADEMY


.....

Winthrop Mackworth Praed
Sonnet 40 - Oh, Yes! They Love Through All This World Of Ours!

XL

Oh, yes! they love through all this world of ours!
I will not gainsay love, called love forsooth.
.....
Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Barrett Browning
A Dream Of Oblivion

The day of time was darkening to its end:
The sun hung chill within the blackened noon,
Its splendors one with night. Form planetrs doomed
The wail of death to empty silence rose.
.....

Clark Ashton Smith
From Monte Pincio

Evening is coming, the sun waxes red,
Radiant colors from heaven are beaming
Life's lustrous longings in infinite streaming;-
Glory in death o'er the mountains is spread.
.....

Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson
The Undying

In thin clear light unshadowed shapes go by
Small on green fields beneath the hueless sky.
They do not stay for question, do not hear
Any old human speech: their tongue and ear
.....

John Freeman
The Lodger

I cannot
quite recall
When first he came,
So reticent and tall,
.....
Bliss Carman

Bliss Carman
The Last Man

All worldly shapes shall melt in gloom,
The Sun himself must die,
Before this mortal shall assume
Its Immortality!
.....

Thomas Campbell
The Streets

Marlboro' and Waterloo and Trafalgar,
Tuileries, Talavera, Valenciennes,
Were strange names all, and all familiar;

.....

John Freeman
Ben Jonson Entertains A Man From Stratford

You are a friend then, as I make it out,
Of our man Shakespeare, who alone of us
Will put an ass's head in Fairyland
As he would add a shilling to more shillings,
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Alcestis

Not long the living weep above their dead,
And you will grieve, Admetus, but not long.
The winter's silence in these desolate halls
Will break with April's laughter on your lips;
.....

John Charles Mcneill
The Adieu

Written Under The Impression That The Author Would Soon Die.


Adieu, thou Hill! where early joy
.....

George Gordon Byron
Unbridled

Why does the ground I stand
Gives way
Whenever I see you

.....

Rose Marie Juan Austin
Rembrandt To Rembrandt

(AMSTERDAM, 1645)


And there you are again, now as you are.
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson