DISPLAY POEMS

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The Pilgrim

I fasted for some forty days on bread and buttermilk,
For passing round the bottle with girls in rags or silk,
In country shawl or Paris cloak, had put my wits astray,
And what's the good of women, for all that they can say
.....
William Butler Yeats

William Butler Yeats
Auguries Of Innocence

To see a world in a grain of sand
And a heaven in a wild flower,
Hold infinity in the palm of your hand
And eternity in an hour.
.....
William Blake

William Blake
Independence Day

WHAT does it all mean anyway,
Noise of cannon and boom of gun,
Deafening, colorful fire display
Starting in with the rising sun?
.....
Edgar Albert Guest

Edgar Albert Guest
In All Ways A Woman

In my young years I took pride in the fact that luck was called a lady. In fact, there were so few public acknowledgments of the female presence that I felt personally honored whenever nature and large ships were referred to as feminine. But as I matured, I began to resent being considered a sister to a changeling as fickle as luck, as aloof as an ocean, and as frivolous as nature. The phrase 'A woman always has the right to change her mind' played so aptly into the negative image of the female that I made myself a victim to an unwavering decision. Even if I made an inane and stupid choice, I stuck by it rather than 'be like a woman and change my mind.'

Being a woman is hard work. Not without joy and even ecstasy, but still relentless, unending work. Becoming an old female may require only being born with certain genitalia, inheriting long-living genes and the fortune not to be run over by an out-of-control truck, but to become and remain a woman command the existence and employment of genius.

.....
Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou
Elegy Xix. - Written In Spring, 1743

Again the labouring hind inverts the soil;
Again the merchant ploughs the tumid wave;
Another spring renews the soldier's toil,
And finds me vacant in the rural cave.
.....

William Shenstone
The Parasol Is The Umbrella's Daughter

1747

The parasol is the umbrella's daughter,
And associates with a fan
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
The Alarm

Get off your downy cots of ease,
There's work that must be done.
Great danger's riding on the seas.
The storm is coming on.
.....
Edgar Albert Guest

Edgar Albert Guest
The Flower And The Leaf: Or, The Lady In The Arbour.[1]

A VISION.


Now turning from the wintry signs, the sun,
.....
John Dryden

John Dryden
My Last Afternoon With Uncle Devereux Winslow

1922: the stone porch of my Grandfatherâ??s summer house

I
â??I wonâ??t go with you. I want to stay with Grandpa!â?
.....

Robert Lowell
Saint Monica

AMONG deep woods is the dismantled scite
Of an old Abbey, where the chaunted rite,
By twice ten brethren of the monkish cowl,
Was duly sung; and requiems for the soul
.....

Charlotte Smith
My Cardiac

My cardiac is not to be sold
but people turn it to another thing
which makes it cold

.....
Adetunbi Maxwell

Adetunbi Maxwell
Psalm

1

Be silent with me, as all bells are silent!

.....

Ingeborg Bachmann
Prejudice

IN yonder red-brick mansion, tight and square,
Just at the town's commencement, lives the mayor.
Some yards of shining gravel, fenced with box,
Lead to the painted portal--where one knocks :
.....

Jane Taylor
Endymion: Book Iii

There are who lord it o'er their fellow-men
With most prevailing tinsel: who unpen
Their baaing vanities, to browse away
The comfortable green and juicy hay
.....
John Keats

John Keats
Iii. O Thou, Whose Stern Command And Precepts Pure...

O THOU, whose stern command and precepts pure
(Tho' agony in every vein should start,
And slowly drain the blood-drops from the heart)
Have bade the patient spirit still endure;
.....

William Lisle Bowles
Valentine

This is the time for birds to mate;
To-day the dove
Will mark the ancient amorous date
With moans of love;
.....

John Charles Mcneill
Endymion: Book Iv

Muse of my native land! loftiest Muse!
O first-born on the mountains! by the hues
Of heaven on the spiritual air begot:
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot,
.....
John Keats

John Keats
Privacy

Oh you who are shy of the popular eye,
(Though most of us seek to survive it)
Just think of the goldfish who wanted to die
Because she could never be private.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
A Statue Of Figwood

For yon oaken avenue, swain, you must steer,
Where a statue of figwood, you'll see, has been set:
It has never been barked, has three legs and no ear;
But I think there is life in the patriarch yet.
.....

Jon Corelis Theocritus
All I May, If Small

819

All I may, if small,
Do it not display
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
The Cotter's Saturday Night

INSCRIBED TO ROBERT AIKEN, ESQ.

Let not Ambition mock their useful toil,
Their homely joys and destiny obscure;
.....
Robert Burns

Robert Burns
An Actor

Some one ('tis hardly new) has oddly said
The color of a trumpet's blare is red;
And Joseph Emmett thinks the crimson shame
On woman's cheek a trumpet-note of fame.
.....

Ambrose Bierce
The Adieu. Written Under The Impression That The Author Would Soon Die.

1.

Adieu, thou Hill! [1] where early joy
Spread roses o'er my brow;
.....

George Gordon Byron
Fragment Of 'the Castle Builder.'

To-night I'll have my friar -- let me think
About my room, -- I'll have it in the pink;
It should be rich and sombre, and the moon,
Just in its mid-life in the midst of June,
.....
John Keats

John Keats
The Hermit

Far in a wild, unknown to public view,
From youth to age a rev'rend hermit grew;
The moss his bed, the cave his humble cell,
His food the fruits, his drink the crystal well:
.....
Thomas Parnell

Thomas Parnell
Charity

O why your good deeds with such pride do you scan,
And why that self-satisfied smile
At the shilling you gave to the poor working man,
That lifted you over the stile?
.....
Charles Lamb

Charles Lamb
Windsor Forest

Thy forests, Windsor! and thy green retreats,
At once the Monarch's and the Muse's seats,
Invite my lays. Be present, sylvan maids!
Unlock your springs, and open all your shades.
.....
Alexander Pope

Alexander Pope
Helpstone Green.

Ye injur'd fields, ye once were gay,
When nature's hand display'd
Long waving rows of willows grey,
And clumps of hawthorn shade;
.....
John Clare

John Clare
The Shepheardes Calender: December

December: Ã?gloga Duodecima.

He gentle shepheard satte beside a springe,
All in the shadowe of a bushy brere,
.....
Edmund Spenser

Edmund Spenser
The Elder Brother.

Centrick, in London noise, and London follies,
Proud Covent Garden blooms, in smoky glory;
For chairmen, coffee-rooms, piazzas, dollies,
Cabbages, and comedians, fame'd in story!
.....

George Colman
How Beastly The Bourgeois Is

How beastly the bourgeois is
especially the male of the species-

Presentable, eminently presentable-
.....
D. H. Lawrence

D. H. Lawrence
Ghazal 53

The corner of the tavern is my altar, where I pray
At dawn, the mantra of the Old Magi, I say.
Fear not if the harp plays not at sun's morning ascent
My morning cry of repentance is the music I play.
.....

Shams Al-din Hafiz Shirazi
The Deserted Village

Sweet Auburn! loveliest village of the plain,
Where health and plenty cheered the labouring swain,
Where smiling spring its earliest visits paid,
And parting summer's lingering blooms delayed:
.....
Oliver Goldsmith

Oliver Goldsmith
The Vanities Of Life

Vanity of vanities, all is vanity.--_Solomon_

What are life's joys and gains?
What pleasures crowd its ways,
.....
John Clare

John Clare
Sketches In The Exhibition

What various objects strike with various force,
Achilles, Hebe, and Sir Watkin's horse!
Here summer scenes, there Pentland's stormy ridge,
Lords, ladies, Noah's ark, and Cranford bridge!
.....

William Lisle Bowles
Corinna

This day (the year I dare not tell)
Apollo play'd the midwife's part;
Into the world Corinna fell,
And he endued her with his art.
.....
Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift
An After-dinner Poem

(TERPSICHORE)

Read at the Annual Dinner of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, at
Cambridge, August 24, 1843.
.....

Oliver Wendell Holmes
How Jack Made The Giants Uncommonly Sore

Of all the ill-fated
Boys ever created
Young Jack was the wretchedest lad:
An emphatic, erratic,
.....

Guy Wetmore Carryl
Tale Iv

PROCRASTINATION.

Love will expire--the gay, the happy dream
Will turn to scorn, indiff'rence, or esteem:
.....
George Crabbe

George Crabbe
The Poet

â??A Rhapsody


Of all the various lots around the ball,
.....
Mark Akenside

Mark Akenside
Mors Leonis

When o'er the aged lion steals
The instinct of approaching death,
Whose numbing grasp he vaguely feels
In trembling limbs and labored breath,
.....
John L. Stoddard

John L. Stoddard
Norwegian Seamen's Song

Norwegian seamen are
A folk grown strong 'neath sail and spar;
Where boats can find a way,
The best men there are they.
.....

Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson
The Patchwork Quilt

Here is this patchwork quilt I've made
Of patterned silks and old brocade,
Small faded rags in memory rich
Sewn each to each with feather stitch,
.....
Robert Graves

Robert Graves
Pan And Luna

Si credere dignum est.--Virgil, Georgics, III, 390


Oh, worthy of belief I hold it was,
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
The Garden

This Garden does not take my eyes,
Though here you show how art of men
Can purchase Nature at a price
Would stock old Paradise again.
.....
James Shirley

James Shirley
Death

Why should man's high aspiring mind
Burn in him with so proud a breath,
When all his haughty views can find
In this world yields to death?
.....
John Clare

John Clare
Childhood, A Poem: Part I

Pictured in memory's mellowing glass, how sweet
Our infant days, our infant joys, to greet;
To roam in fancy in each cherish'd scene,
The village churchyard, and the village green,
.....

Henry Kirk White
On Beauty

Beauty deserves the homage of the muse:
Shall mine, rebellious, the dear theme refuse?
No; while my breast respires the vital air,
Wholly I am devoted to the fair.
.....

James Thomson
Picture Books

I HOLD the finest picture-books
Are woods an' fields an' runnin' brooks;
An' when the month o' May has done
Her paintin', an' the mornin' sun
.....
Edgar Albert Guest

Edgar Albert Guest
Thoughtless Cruelty

There, Robert, you have killed that fly,
And should you thousand ages try
The life you've taken to supply,
You could not do it.
.....
Charles Lamb

Charles Lamb