BENEFIT POEMS

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People Like Candles

*PEOPLE LIKE CANDLES*

*"The world would have been a better domicile to dwell in, if our impediments are equally solved. But nay, some are like candles"* *paciolo pen saint*

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Paciolo Pen Saint

Paciolo Pen Saint
A Befitting Send-off

Brothers, carry out the autopsy gently
That corpse was a rich man's residence
The carcass was never an ordinary body
To be hacked and dug upon
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Michael Aete

Michael Aete
Beautiful Wife.

My wife is beautiful
Beautiful not in appearance,
Appearance can be beautify,
Beautify with surgery.
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Norbu Dorji

Norbu Dorji
Sonnet 028: How Can I Then Return In Happy Plight

How can I then return in happy plight
That am debarred the benefit of rest?
When day's oppression is not eased by night,
But day by night, and night by day oppressed?
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William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Power Of Words

Words are very powerful that
It cut deeper than a swords,
The cuts of words are irreparable and,
The blow with swords can be cured.
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Norbu Dorji

Norbu Dorji
Absalom And Achitophel

In pious times, ere priest-craft did begin,
Before polygamy was made a sin;
When man, on many, multipli'd his kind,
Ere one to one was cursedly confin'd:
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John Dryden

John Dryden
The Change

POOR River, now thou'rt almost dry,
What Nymph, or Swain, will near thee lie?
Since brought, alas! to sad Decay,
What Flocks, or Herds, will near thee stay?
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Anne Kingsmill Finch
The Mind Of Love

Wishing to relief all sentient beings from downfall,
Motivate to help disadvantages one,
Loving and caring to benefit society,
Is most beautiful of being human.
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Norbu Dorji

Norbu Dorji
But Then Who Cares For Figures

An argument sometimes used against paying women as highly as men for the
same work is that women are only temporarily in industry.

Forty-four per cent of the women teachers in the public schools of New
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Alice Duer Miller
Harvest

See! the corn again in ear!
How the fields and valleys smile!
Harvest now is drawing near
To repay the farmer's toil:
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John Newton
The Lonesome Little Shoe

The clock was in ill humor; so was the vase. It was all on account of the little shoe that had been placed on the mantel-piece that day, and had done nothing but sigh dolorously all the afternoon and evening.

"Look you here, neighbor," quoth the clock, in petulant tones, "you are sadly mistaken if you think you will be permitted to disturb our peace and harmony with your constant sighs and groans. If you are ill, pray let us know; otherwise, have done with your manifestations of distress."

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Eugene Field

Eugene Field
Infidelity

Three Triangles

TRIANGLE ONE

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Robert William Service
The Sonnets Cxix - What Potions Have I Drunk Of Siren Tears

What potions have I drunk of Siren tears,
Distill'd from limbecks foul as hell within,
Applying fears to hopes, and hopes to fears,
Still losing when I saw myself to win!
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William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Sonnet 119: What Potions Have I Drunk Of Siren Tears

What potions have I drunk of Siren tears,
Distilled from limbecks foul as hell within,
Applying fears to hopes, and hopes to fears,
Still losing when I saw my self to win!
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Fears In Solitude

Written in April 1798, during the alarm of an invasion

A green and silent spot, amid the hills,
A small and silent dell! O'er stiller place
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The Medal

Of all our antic sights and pageantry
Which English idiots run in crowds to see,
The Polish Medal bears the prize alone;
A monster, more the favourite of the town
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John Dryden

John Dryden
The Products Of My Farm Are These

1025

The Products of my Farm are these
Sufficient for my Own
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Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Infidelity

Three Triangles

TRIANGLE ONE

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Robert Service

Robert Service
Occasional Address

Written for the benefit of a distressed Player, detained
at Brighthelmstone for Debt, November 1792.
WHEN in a thousand swarms, the summer o'er,
The birds of passage quit our English shore,
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Charlotte Smith
Captain Craig Iii

I found the old man sitting in his bed,
Propped up and uncomplaining. On a chair
Beside him was a dreary bowl of broth,
A magazine, some glasses, and a pipe.
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Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
John Brown

Though for your sake I would not have you now
So near to me tonight as now you are,
God knows how much a stranger to my heart
Was any cold word that I may have written;
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Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
The Maple

is a system of posture for wood.
A way of not falling down
for twigs that happens
to benefit birds. I don't know.
.....

Bob Hicok
An Epistle From A Gentleman To Madam Deshouliers

URANIA, whom the Town admires,
Whose Wit and Beauty share our Praise;
This fair URANIA who inspires
A thousand Joys a thousand ways,
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Anne Kingsmill Finch
Don Juan: Canto The Ninth

Oh, Wellington! (or 'Villainton'--for Fame
Sounds the heroic syllables both ways;
France could not even conquer your great name,
But punn'd it down to this facetious phrase-
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George Gordon Byron
The Mind Of Desire

Helping someone with expectation,
Something in return one day,
It is the intention to benefit oneself,
Love someone and expect the same from other parties,
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Norbu Dorji

Norbu Dorji
Judgement

They judge me
Because of tone
Of my voice
Judge me
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Bazimya Brian

Bazimya Brian
King Stephen

A FRAGMENT OF A TRAGEDY
ACT I.
SCENE I. Field of Battle.
Alarum. Enter King STEPHEN, Knights, and Soldiers.
.....
John Keats

John Keats
The Mandrake

FLORENTINE we now design to show;--
A greater blockhead ne'er appeared below;
It seems a prudent woman he had wed,
With beauty that might grace a monarch's bed;
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Jean De La Fontaine
A Walts With A Tear In It

Ah, how I love it in these first few days,
Fresh from the forest and out of the snow,
Awkwardness obvious still in every bough,
When every silver thread lazily sways
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Boris Pasternak

Boris Pasternak
The Innocent Thief

Not a flower can be found in the fields,
Or the spot that we till for our pleasure,
From the largest to the least, but it yields
The bee never wearied a treasure.
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William Cowper

William Cowper
Wat Tyler - Act Iii

ACT III.


SCENEâ??SMITHFIELD.
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Robert Southey

Robert Southey
The Death Of Prince Leopold

Alas! noble Prince Leopold, he is dead!
Who often has his lustre shed:
Especially by singing for the benefit of Esher School,
Which proves he was a wise prince. and no conceited fool.
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William Topaz Mcgonagall
Lancan Vei Per Mei La Landa

Lancan vei per mei la landa
dels arbres chazer la fòlha,
ans que.lh frejura s'espanda
ni.l gens termini s'esconda,
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Bernard De Ventadorn
Love

Are you fleeing from Love because of a single humiliation?
What do you know of Love except the name?
Love has a hundred forms of pride and disdain,
and is gained by a hundred means of persuasion.
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Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi
Yad Mordechai

Yad Mordechai. Those who fell here
still look out the windows like sick children
who are not allowed outside to play.
And on the hillside, the battle is reenacted
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Yehuda Amichai
Invitation To The Redbreast

Sweet bird, whom the winter constrains--
And seldom another it can--
To seek a retreat while he reigns
In the well-shelterâ??d dwellings of man,
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William Cowper

William Cowper
Sonnet Cxix

What potions have I drunk of Siren tears,
Distill'd from limbecks foul as hell within,
Applying fears to hopes and hopes to fears,
Still losing when I saw myself to win!
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
February

Begin, my muse, the imitative lay,
Aonian doxies sound the thrumming string;
Attempt no number of the plaintive Gay,
Let me like midnight cats, or Collins sing.
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Thomas Chatterton
St. Julian's Prayer

TO charms and philters, secret spells and prayers,
How many round attribute all their cares!
In these howe'er I never can believe,
And laugh at follies that so much deceive.
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Jean De La Fontaine
Sonnet Xxviii

How can I then return in happy plight,
That am debarr'd the benefit of rest?
When day's oppression is not eased by night,
But day by night, and night by day, oppress'd?
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William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
The Toad And Spyder. A Duell

Upon a day, when the Dog-star
Unto the world proclaim'd a war,
And poyson bark'd from black throat,
And from his jaws infection shot,
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Richard Lovelace

Richard Lovelace
Reflection On The Fallibility Of Nemesis

He who is ridden by a conscience
Worries about a lot of nonscience;
He without benefit of scruples
His fun and income soon quadruples.
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Ogden Nash
An Elegie. On The Death Of Mrs. Cassandra Cotton, Only Sist

Hither with hallowed steps as is the ground,
That must enshrine this saint with lookes profound,
And sad aspects as the dark vails you weare,
Virgins opprest, draw gently, gently neare;
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Richard Lovelace

Richard Lovelace
Jubilate Agno: Fragment B, Part 3

For a Man is to be looked upon in that which he excells as on a prospect.

For there be twelve cardinal virtues -- three to the East -- Greatness, Valour, Piety.

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Christopher Smart

Christopher Smart
The Stage-coach - Prose

Omne bene
Sine poena
Tempus est ludendi.
Venit hora
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Washington Irving
Verses Written At Bath, On Finding The Heel Of A Shoe.

Fortune! I thank thee: gentle goddess! thanks!
Not that my muse, though bashful, shall deny
She would have thank'd thee rather hadst thou cast
A treasure in her way; for neither meed
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William Cowper

William Cowper
The Book And The Ring

Here were the end, had anything an end:
Thus, lit and launched, up and up roared and soared
A rocket, till the key o' the vault was reached,
And wide heaven held, a breathless minute-space,
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Robert Browning

Robert Browning
The Sonnets Xxviii - How Can I Then Return In Happy Plight

How can I then return in happy plight,
That am debarre'd the benefit of rest?
When day's oppression is not eas'd by night,
But day by night and night by day oppress'd,
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
The Birds Of Spring - Prose

by Geoffrey Crayon, Gent.


My quiet residence in the country, aloof from fashion, politics, and the money market, leaves me rather at a loss for important occupation, and drives me to the study of nature, and other low pursuits. Having few neighbors, also, on whom to keep a watch, and exercise my habits of observation, I am fain to amuse myself with prying into the domestic concerns and peculiarities of the animals around me; and, during the present season, have derived considerable entertainment from certain sociable little birds, almost the only visitors we have, during this early part of the year.
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Washington Irving
Desultory Thoughts On Criticism - Prose

"Let a man write never so well, there are now-a-days a sort of persons they call critics, that, egad, have no more wit in them than so many hobby-horses: but they'll laugh at you, Sir, and find fault, and censure things, that, egad, I'm sure they are not able to do themselves; a sort of envious persons, that emulate the glories of persons of parts, and think to build their fame by calumniation of persons that, egad, to my knowledge, of all persons in the world, are in nature the persons that do as much despise all that, as, a, In fine, I'll say no more of 'em!" REHEARSAL.

All the world knows the story of the tempest-tossed voyager, who, coming upon a strange coast, and seeing a man hanging in chains, hailed it with joy, as the sign of a civilized country. In like manner we may hail, as a proof of the rapid advancement of civilization and refinement in this country, the increasing number of delinquent authors daily gibbeted for the edification of the public.

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Washington Irving