HEDGE POEMS

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The Barefoot Boy

Blessings on thee, little man,
Barefoot boy, with cheek of tan!
With thy turned-up pantaloons,
And thy merry whistled tunes;
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
Waring

I

What's become of Waring
Since he gave us all the slip,
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Peace

And sometimes I am sorry when the grass
Is growing over the stones in quiet hollows
And the cocksfoot leans across the rutted cart-pass
That I am not the voice of country fellows
.....

Patrick Kavanagh
Any Wife To Any Husband

I

My love, this is the bitterest, that thou
Who art all truth and who dost love me now
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Venus And Adonis

Even as the sun with purple-coloured face
Had ta'en his last leave of the weeping morn,
Rose-cheeked Adonis hied him to the chase;
Hunting he loved, but love he laughed to scorn.
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Summer

Come we to the summer, to the summer we will come,
For the woods are full of bluebells and the hedges full of bloom,
And the crow is on the oak a-building of her nest,
And love is burning diamonds in my true lover's breast;
.....
John Clare

John Clare
The Flower And The Leaf: Or, The Lady In The Arbour.[1]

A VISION.


Now turning from the wintry signs, the sun,
.....
John Dryden

John Dryden
Farmer's Boy

He waits all day beside his little flock
And asks the passing stranger what's o'clock,
But those who often pass his daily tasks
Look at their watch and tell before he asks.
.....
John Clare

John Clare
June

nd her sultry bloom
Insects as small as dust are never done
Wi' glittering dance and reeling in the sun
And green wood fly and blossom haunting bee
.....
John Clare

John Clare
Punishment In Kindergarten

Today the world is a little more my own.
No need to remember the pain
A blue-frocked woman caused, throwing
Words at me like pots and pans, to drain
.....

Kamala Das
The Lay Of The Laborer

A spade! a rake! a hoe!
A pickaxe, or a bill!
A hook to reap, or a scythe to mow,
A flail, or what ye willâ??
.....
Thomas Hood

Thomas Hood
The Passionate Pilgrim

I.
When my love swears that she is made of truth,
I do believe her, though I know she lies,
That she might think me some untutor'd youth,
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
The Hawthorn Tree

Not much to me is yonder lane
Where I go every day;
But when there's been a shower of rain
And hedge-birds whistle gay,
.....
Siegfried Sassoon

Siegfried Sassoon
Summer Images

Now swarthy Summer, by rude health embrowned,
Precedence takes of rosy fingered Spring;
And laughing Joy, with wild flowers prank'd, and crown'd,
A wild and giddy thing,
.....
John Clare

John Clare
March

The Sun at noon to higher air,
Unharnessing the silver Pair
That late before his chariot swam,
Rides on the gold wool of the Ram.
.....
A. E. Housman

A. E. Housman
From Sunset To Star Rise

Go from me, summer friends, and tarry not:
I am no summer friend, but wintry cold,
A silly sheep benighted from the fold,
A sluggard with a thorn-choked garden plot.
.....
Christina Rossetti

Christina Rossetti
The Message

To you, my comrades, whether far or near,
I send this message. Let our past revive;
Come, sound reveille to our hearts once more.
Expecting, I shall wait till at my door
.....
Elizabeth Stoddard

Elizabeth Stoddard
An Interlude

IN the greenest growth of the Maytime,
I rode where the woods were wet,
Between the dawn and the daytime;
The spring was glad that we met.
.....
Algernon Charles Swinburne

Algernon Charles Swinburne
On The Grasshopper And Cricket

The poetry of earth is never dead:
When all the birds are faint with the hot sun,
And hide in cooling trees, a voice will run
From hedge to hedge about the new-mown mead;
.....
John Keats

John Keats
Eudaemon

O happiness, I know not what far seas,
Blue hills and deep, thy sunny realms surround,
That thus in Music's wistful harmonies
And concert of sweet sound
.....
Alan Seeger

Alan Seeger
The Combat

It was not meant for human eyes,
That combat on the shabby patch
Of clods and trampled turf that lies
Somewhere beneath the sodden skies
.....

Edwin Muir
The Flitting

I've left my own old home of homes,
Green fields and every pleasant place;
The summer like a stranger comes,
I pause and hardly know her face.
.....
John Clare

John Clare
Marriage

LOVE springs as lightly from the human heart
As springs the lovely rose upon the brier,
Which turns the common hedge to floral fire,
As Love wings Time with rosy-feathered dart.
.....

Mathilde Blind
Humanitad

It is full winter now: the trees are bare,
Save where the cattle huddle from the cold
Beneath the pine, for it doth never wear
The autumn's gaudy livery whose gold
.....
Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde
Little Fugue

The yew's black fingers wag:
Cold clouds go over.
So the deaf and dumb
Signal the blind, and are ignored.
.....

Sylvia Plath
A Beautiful Young Nymph Going To Bed

Corinna, Pride of Drury-Lane,
For whom no Shepherd sighs in vain;
Never did Covent Garden boast
So bright a batter'd, strolling Toast;
.....
Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift
August Afternoon

Thump of a horse's hoof behind the hedge;
Long stripes of shadow, and green flame in the grass
Between them; discrowned, glaucous poppy--pods
On their tall stalks; a rose
.....

Robert Laurence Binyon
One Sister Have I In Our House

14

One Sister have I in our house,
And one, a hedge away.
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Sweet Was The Walk

Sweet was the walk along the narrow lane
At noon, the bank and hedge-rows all the way
Shagged with wild pale green tufts of fragrant hay,
Caught by the hawthorns from the loaded wain,
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Ken

The town is old and very steep
A place of bells and cloisters and grey towers,
And black-clad people walking in their sleepâ??
A nun, a priest, a woman taking flowers
.....

Charlotte Mary Mew
Mercian Hymns

I

King of the perennial holly-groves, the riven sandstone: overlord of the M5: architect of the historic rampart and ditch, the citadel at Tamworth, the summer hermitage in Holy Cross: guardian of the Welsh Bridge and the Iron Bridge: contractor to the desirable new estates: saltmaster: moneychanger: commissioner for oaths: martyrologist: the friend of Charlemagne.

.....

Geoffrey Hill
Matins

Gray earth, gray mist, gray sky:
Through vapors hurrying by,
Larger than wont, on high
Floats the horned, yellow moon.
.....
Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus
Regret

Thin summer rain on grass and bush and hedge,
Reddening the road and deepening the green
On wide, blurred lawn, and in close-tangled sedge;
Veiling in gray the landscape stretched between
.....
Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus
Teignmouth

I.
Here all the summer could I stay,
For there's Bishop's teign
And King's teign
.....
John Keats

John Keats
To Iris

IF I might build a palace, fair
With every joy of soul and sense,
And set my heart as sentry there
To guard your happy innocence--
.....
Edith Nesbit

Edith Nesbit
Rob Roy

(Child, vol. vi. Early Edition.)


Rob Roy from the Highlands cam,
.....
Andrew Lang

Andrew Lang
A Lady Red'amid The Hill

74

A Lady red-amid the Hill
Her annual secret keeps!
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
The Shepherd's Calendar - June

Now summer is in flower and natures hum
Is never silent round her sultry bloom
Insects as small as dust are never done
Wi' glittering dance and reeling in the sun
.....
John Clare

John Clare
November

The landscape sleeps in mist from morn till noon;
And, if the sun looks through, 'tis with a face
Beamless and pale and round, as if the moon,
When done the journey of her nightly race,
.....
John Clare

John Clare
Field Path

The beams in blossom with their spots of jet
Smelt sweet as gardens wheresoever met;
The level meadow grass was in the swath;
The hedge briar rose hung right across the path,
.....
John Clare

John Clare
To Iris

If I might build a palace, fair
With every joy of soul and sense,
And set my heart as sentry there
To guard your happy innocence-
.....

E. (edith) Nesbit
The Fox

The shepherd on his journey heard when nigh
His dog among the bushes barking high;
The ploughman ran and gave a hearty shout,
He found a weary fox and beat him out.
.....
John Clare

John Clare
The Widow To Her Son-s Betrothed

I.

AH, cease to plead with that sweet cheerful voice,
Nor bid me struggle with a weight of woe,
.....
Caroline Elizabeth Sarah Norton

Caroline Elizabeth Sarah Norton
Gipsy Too

If they missed my face in Farmersâ?? Arms
When the landlord lit the lamp,
They would grin and say in their country way,
â??Oh! heâ??s down at the Gipsy camp!â??
.....
Henry Lawson

Henry Lawson
Corn

To-day the woods are trembling through and through
With shimmering forms, that flash before my view,
Then melt in green as dawn-stars melt in blue.
The leaves that wave against my cheek caress
.....
Sidney Lanier

Sidney Lanier
The Rose

We love the land when the world goes round,
And deep, deep down in her thorny ground,
Where nobody comes, and nobody knows,
We love the Rose. Oh! we love the Rose.
.....
Henry Lawson

Henry Lawson
Happiness

I have found happiness who looked not for it.
There was a green fresh hedge,
And willows by the river side,
And whistling sedge.
.....

John Freeman
In The Lane

The birds return,
The blossom brightens again the cherry bough.
The hedges are green again
In the airless lane,
.....

John Freeman
Resignation

To die be given us, or attain!
Fierce work it were, to do again.
So pilgrims, bound for Mecca, pray'd
At burning noon: so warriors said,
.....
Matthew Arnold

Matthew Arnold