PUBLISH POEMS

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Religio Laici

Dim, as the borrow'd beams of moon and stars
To lonely, weary, wand'ring travellers,
Is reason to the soul; and as on high,
Those rolling fires discover but the sky
.....
John Dryden

John Dryden
Rangers

The rangers are frontline saviours,
With strong mind set of protection,
Poorly equipped & skilled,
Serve as frontline rangers to protect common wealth,
.....
Norbu Dorji

Norbu Dorji
To Mr. Murray

To hook the reader, you, John Murray,
Have publish'd 'Anjou's Margaret,
Which won't be sold off in a hurry
(At least, it has not been as yet);
.....

George Gordon Byron
Tannhauser

To my mother. May, 1870.


The Landgrave Hermann held a gathering
.....
Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus
Goading The Muse

this man used to be an
interesting writer,
he was able to say brisk and
refreshing things.
.....

Charles Bukowski
The Sonnets Cii - My Love Is Strengthen'd, Though More Weak In Seeming

My love is strengthen'd, though more weak in seeming;
I love not less, though less the show appear;
That love is merchandiz'd, whose rich esteeming,
The owner's tongue doth publish every where.
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Bowles And Campbell

To the tune of 'Why, how now, saucy jade?'

Why, how now, saucy Tom?
If you thus must ramble,
.....

George Gordon Byron
To A Pupil

IS reform needed? Is it through you?
The greater the reform needed, the greater the personality you need
to accomplish it.

.....
Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman
Authority

'Authority, authority!' they shout
Whose minds, not large enough to hold a doubt,
Some chance opinion ever entertain,
By dogma billeted upon their brain.
.....

Ambrose Bierce
Don Juan: Canto The Fourteenth

If from great nature's or our own abyss
Of thought we could but snatch a certainty,
Perhaps mankind might find the path they miss--
But then 'twould spoil much good philosophy.
.....

George Gordon Byron
To The Troubler Of The World

At last we know you, War-lord. You, that flung
The gauntlet down, fling down the mask you wore,
Publish your heart, and let its pent hate pour,
You that had God for ever on your tongue.
.....

William Watson
Lines In Reply To The Beautiful Poet Who Welcomed News Of Mcgonagall's Departure From Dundee

Dear Johnny, I return my thanks to you;
But more than thanks is your due
For publishing the scurrilous poetry about me
Leaving the Ancient City of Dundee.
.....

William Topaz Mcgonagall
The Secret Police

They are listening in the wires,
in the walls, under the eaves
in the wings of house martins,
in the ears of old women,
.....

Ken Smith
To-day

I rake no coffined clay, nor publish wide
The resurrection of departed pride.
Safe in their ancient crannies, dark and deep,
Let kings and conquerors, saints and soldiers sleep-
.....
Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson
Verses On The Death Of Dr. Swift, D.s.p.d.

Dans l'adversité de nos meilleurs amis
nous trouvons quelque chose, qui ne nous déplaît pas.


.....
Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift
Lancelot 05

Gawaine, his body trembling and his heart
Pounding as if he were a boy in battle,
Sat crouched as far away from everything
As walls would give him distance. Bedivere
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Sonnet 102: My Love Is Strengthened, Though More Weak In Seeming

My love is strengthened, though more weak in seeming;
I love not less, though less the show appear;
That love is merchandized, whose rich esteeming
The owner's tongue doth publish everywhere.
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Poeta Fit, Non Nascitur

“How shall I be a poet?
How shall I write in rhyme?
You told me once the very wish
Partook of the sublime:
.....
Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll
The Three Horses

What shall I be?-I will be a knight
Walled up in armour black,
With a sword of sharpness, a hammer of might.
And a spear that will not crack-
.....
George Macdonald

George Macdonald
In Paths Untrodden

IN paths untrodden,
In the growth by margins of pond-waters,
Escaped from the life that exhibits itself,
From all the standards hitherto publish'd--from the pleasures,
.....
Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman
Mac Flecknoe.[1]

All human things are subject to decay,
And when fate summons, monarchs must obey.
This Flecknoe found, who, like Augustus, young
Was call'd to empire, and had govern'd long;
.....
John Dryden

John Dryden
The Candidate.

Enough of Actors--let them play the player,
And, free from censure, fret, sweat, strut, and stare;
Garrick[1] abroad, what motives can engage
To waste one couplet on a barren stage?
.....

Charles Churchill
Paradise Regained - The First Book

I who e're while the happy Garden sung,
By one mans disobedience lost, now sing
Recover'd Paradise to all mankind,
By one mans firm obedience fully tri'd
.....
John Milton

John Milton
Paradise Lost - Book Ii

High on a Throne of Royal State, which far
Outshon the wealth of Ormus and of Ind,
Or where the gorgeous East with richest hand
Showrs on her Kings Barbaric Pearl and Gold,
.....
John Milton

John Milton
The Missionary. Preface To The Second Edition.[1]

The Missionary.

Amor patrië ratione potentior omni.

.....

William Lisle Bowles
In Sepulcretis

'Vidistis ipso rapere de rogo coenam.'
- Catullus, LIX. 3.

'To publish even one line of an author which he himself has not intended for the public at large, especially letters which are addressed to private persons, is to commit a despicable act of felony.'
.....
Algernon Charles Swinburne

Algernon Charles Swinburne
Epistles To Several Persons: Epistle To Dr. Arbuthnot

Neque sermonibus vulgi dederis te, nec in prmiis spem posueris rerum tuarum; suiste oportet illecebris ipsa virtus trahat ad verum decus. Quid de te alii loquantur, ipsi videant,sed loquentur tamen.
(Cicero, De Re Publica VI.23)["... you will not any longer attend to the vulgar mob's gossip nor put your trust in human rewards for your deeds; virtue, through her own charms, should lead you to true glory. Let what others say about you be their concern; whatever it is, they will say it anyway."
Shut, shut the door, good John! fatigu'd, I said,
Tie up the knocker, say I'm sick, I'm dead.
.....
Alexander Pope

Alexander Pope
English Bards And Scotch Reviewers: A Satire

'I had rather be a kitten, and cry mew!
Than one of these same metre ballad-mongers'~Shakespeare

'Such shameless bards we have; and yet 'tis true,
.....

George Gordon Byron
English Bards And Scotch Reviewers: A Satire

'I had rather be a kitten, and cry mew!
Than one of these same metre ballad-mongers'~Shakespeare

'Such shameless bards we have; and yet 'tis true,
.....

George Gordon Byron
English Bards And Scotch Reviewers: A Satire

'I had rather be a kitten, and cry mew!
Than one of these same metre ballad-mongers'~Shakespeare

'Such shameless bards we have; and yet 'tis true,
.....

George Gordon Byron
English Bards And Scotch Reviewers: A Satire

'I had rather be a kitten, and cry mew!
Than one of these same metre ballad-mongers'~Shakespeare

'Such shameless bards we have; and yet 'tis true,
.....

George Gordon Byron
An Expostulation To Lord King

How can you, my Lord, thus delight to torment all
The Peers of realm about cheapening their corn,
When you know, if one hasn't a very high rental,
'Tis hardly worth while being very high born?
.....
Thomas Moore

Thomas Moore
Petition

Sir, no man's enemy, forgiving all
But will his negative inversion, be prodigal:
Send to us power and light, a sovereign touch
Curing the intolerable neural itch,
.....
W. H. Auden

W. H. Auden
Be Angry At The Sun

That public men publish falsehoods
Is nothing new. That America must accept
Like the historical republics corruption and empire
Has been known for years.
.....

Robinson Jeffers
Mock Panegyric On A Young Friend

In measured verse I'll now rehearse
The charms of lovely Anna:
And, first, her mind is unconfined
Like any vast savannah.
.....

Jane Austen
Epigram - To John I Owed Great Obligation

To John I owed great obligation,
But John unhappily thought fit
To publish it to all the nation:
Sure John and I are more than quit.
.....
Matthew Prior

Matthew Prior
The Convocation: A Poem

When Vertue's Standard Ecclesiasticks bear,
Their sacred Robe the noblest Minds revere.
All to its Guidance do their Thoughts submit,
But such who triumph in licentious Wit;
.....

Richard Savage
Joseph Made Known To His Brethren

When Joseph his brethren beheld,
Afflicted and trembling with fear;
His heart with compassion was filled,
From weeping he could not forbear.
.....

John Newton
The Double-headed Snake Of Newbury

Far away in the twilight time
Of every people, in every clime,
Dragons and griffins and monsters dire,
Born of water, and air, and fire,
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
Ballade To Our Lady Of Czestochowa

I

Lady and Queen and Mystery manifold
And very Regent of the untroubled sky,
.....
Hilaire Belloc

Hilaire Belloc
The Mendicants

Charity, Charity - parson and priest
Ever in church and in chapel have taught
'Give ye in charity e'en to the least,
So may the favor of Heaven be bought.
.....

Clarence Michael James Stanislaus Dennis
The Mendicants

Charity, Charity - parson and priest
Ever in church and in chapel have taught
'Give ye in charity e'en to the least,
So may the favor of Heaven be bought.
.....

Clarence Michael James Stanislaus Dennis
The Mendicants

Charity, Charity - parson and priest
Ever in church and in chapel have taught
'Give ye in charity e'en to the least,
So may the favor of Heaven be bought.
.....

Clarence Michael James Stanislaus Dennis
The Mendicants

Charity, Charity - parson and priest
Ever in church and in chapel have taught
'Give ye in charity e'en to the least,
So may the favor of Heaven be bought.
.....

Clarence Michael James Stanislaus Dennis
Preface To Ossian

WITHOUT increasing his genius, the author may have improved his language, in the eleven years that the following poems have been in the hands of the public. Errors in diction might have been committed at twenty-four, which the experience of a riper age may remove; and some exuberances in imagery may be restrained with advantage, by a degree of judgment acquired in the progress of time. Impressed with this opinion, he ran over the whole with attention and accuracy; and he hopes he has brought the work to a state of correctness which will preclude all future improvements.

The eagerness with which these poems have been received abroad, is a recompense for the coldness with which a few have affected to treat them at home. All the polite nations of Europe have transferred them into their respective languages; and they speak of him who brought them to light, in terms that might flatter the vanity of one fond of flame. In a convenient indifference for a literary reputation, the author hears praise without being elevated, and ribaldry without being depressed. He has frequently seen the first bestowed too precipitately; and the latter is so faithless to its purpose, that it is often the only index to merit in the present age.

.....

James Macpherson
Plutonian Ode

I

What new element before us unborn in nature? Is there
a new thing under the Sun?
.....

Allen Ginsberg
An 'exhibit'

Goldenson hanged! Well, Heaven forbid
That I should smile above him:
Though truth to tell, I never did
Exactly love him.
.....

Ambrose Bierce
Recorders Ages Hence

RECORDERS ages hence!
Come, I will take you down underneath this impassive exterior--I will
tell you what to say of me;
Publish my name and hang up my picture as that of the tenderest
.....
Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman
The Task: Book Vi. -- The Winter Walk At Noon

There is in souls a sympathy with sounds;
And as the mind is pitchâ??d the ear is pleased
With melting airs, or martial, brisk, or grave:
Some chord in unison with what we hear
.....
William Cowper

William Cowper