PREJUDICE POEMS

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Before You Fall In Love

!!Before you fall in love!!

Here are those small intricacies that you miss..
Here lies those major parts that you prejudice..
.....
Meetali Sharma

Meetali Sharma
They Clapped

they clapped when we landed
thinking africa was just an extension
of the black world
they smiled as we taxied home to be met
.....

Nikki Giovanni
Why I Am A Liberal

"Why?" Because all I haply can and do,
All that I am now, all I hope to be,--
Whence comes it save from fortune setting free
Body and soul the purpose to pursue,
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
East And West

The Day has never understood the Gloaming or the Night;
Though sired by one Creative Power, and nursed at Nature's breast;
The White Man ever fails to read the Dark Man's heart aright;
Though from the self-same Source they came, upon the self-same quest;
.....
Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
Prejudice

IN yonder red-brick mansion, tight and square,
Just at the town's commencement, lives the mayor.
Some yards of shining gravel, fenced with box,
Lead to the painted portal--where one knocks :
.....

Jane Taylor
Christmas Eve

I

Out of the little chapel I burst
Into the fresh night-air again.
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Fallen

My country! by our fathers reared
As champion of the world's opprest;
Whose moral force the tyrant feared;
Whose flag all struggling freemen cheered;
.....
John L. Stoddard

John L. Stoddard
Luna

O France, although you sleep
We call you, we the forbidden!
The shadows have ears,
And the depths have cries.
.....

Victor Marie Hugo
Discrimination

Ooh you what an evil thing
What a cruel word
You have a heart of a rock I say, how can you make our children loose their life's before time? You are a fiasco in our lives, a forever pain in our hearts and a forever negativity in our self esteems

.....
Palesa Molokomme

Palesa Molokomme
Truth

Man, on the dubious waves of error toss'd,
His ship half founder'd, and his compass lost,
Sees, far as human optics may command,
A sleeping fog, and fancies it dry land;
.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
The Pig

In ev'ry age, and each profession,
Men err the most by prepossession;
But when the thing is clearly shown,
And fairly stated, fully known,
.....
Christopher Smart

Christopher Smart
The Farewell

_P_. Farewell to Europe, and at once farewell
To all the follies which in Europe dwell;
To Eastern India now, a richer clime,
Richer, alas! in everything but rhyme,
.....

Charles Churchill
The Young Rat And His Dam, The Cock And The Cat

No Cautions of a Matron, Old and Sage,
Young Rattlehead to Prudence cou'd engage;
But forth the Offspring of her Bed wou'd go,
Nor reason gave, but that he wou'd do so.
.....

Anne Kingsmill Finch
The Wedding Sermon

'Now, while she's changing,' said the Dean,
'Her bridal for her traveling dress,
I'll preach allegiance to your queen!
Preaching's the thing which I profess;
.....
Coventry Patmore

Coventry Patmore
The New Hawaiian Girl

EXPLANATORY

Kamehameha First, of the Hawaiian Islands, conquered his
foes in a great battle, driving them over the high mountain
.....
Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
On The Way

(Philadelphia, 1794)

Note.- The following imaginary dialogue between
Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, which is not based upon
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Captain Craig Ii

Yet that ride had an end, as all rides have;
And the days coming after took the road
That all days take,-though never one of them
Went by but I got some good thought of it
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Vignettes 23: On The Death Of Master Frederic Thomson

In the first dawn of youth I much admire
The lively boy of ruddy countenance,
Strong-built, and bold, and hardy, with black hair,
And dark brown eye, contrasting its blue-white,
.....
Matilda Betham

Matilda Betham
Sheridan

Embalm'd in fame, and sacred from decay,
What mighty name, in arms, in arts, or verse,
From England claims this consecrated day.
Her nobles crowding round the shadowy hearse?
.....
Thomas Gent

Thomas Gent
In Memory Of Mr Agostino Isola, Of Cambridge, Who Died On The 5th Of June, 1797

Awake, O Gratitude! nor let the tears
Of selfish Sorrow smother up thy voice,
When it should speak of a departed friend.
A tender friend, the first I ever lost!
.....
Matilda Betham

Matilda Betham
From A Satire Written To King James I

Did I not know a great man's power and might
In spite of innocence can smother right,
Colour his villainies to get esteem,
And make the honest man the villain seem?
.....
George Wither

George Wither
Meeting And Passing

As I went down the hill along the wall
There was a gate I had leaned at for the view
And had just turned from when I first saw you
As you came up the hill. We met. But all
.....
Robert Frost

Robert Frost
Traits Of Indian Character - Prose

"I appeal to any white man if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not to eat; if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not."
- Speech of an Indian Chief.


.....

Washington Irving
The Hasty Pudding

A POEM IN THREE CANTOS


Canto I
.....

Joel Barlow
The Prelude - Book Ninth

RESIDENCE IN FRANCE

Even as a river, partly (it might seem)
Yielding to old remembrances, and swayed
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Marmion: Introduction To Canto I

November's sky is chill and drear,
November's leaf is red and sear:
Late, gazing down the steepy linn
That hems our little garden in,
.....
Sir Walter Scott

Sir Walter Scott
Queen Mab: Part V.

'Thus do the generations of the earth
Go to the grave and issue from the womb,
Surviving still the imperishable change
That renovates the world; even as the leaves
.....
Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley
The Author

Accursed the man, whom Fate ordains, in spite,
And cruel parents teach, to read and write!
What need of letters? wherefore should we spell?
Why write our names? A mark will do as well.
.....

Charles Churchill
Desultory Thoughts On Criticism - Prose

"Let a man write never so well, there are now-a-days a sort of persons they call critics, that, egad, have no more wit in them than so many hobby-horses: but they'll laugh at you, Sir, and find fault, and censure things, that, egad, I'm sure they are not able to do themselves; a sort of envious persons, that emulate the glories of persons of parts, and think to build their fame by calumniation of persons that, egad, to my knowledge, of all persons in the world, are in nature the persons that do as much despise all that, as, a, In fine, I'll say no more of 'em!" REHEARSAL.

All the world knows the story of the tempest-tossed voyager, who, coming upon a strange coast, and seeing a man hanging in chains, hailed it with joy, as the sign of a civilized country. In like manner we may hail, as a proof of the rapid advancement of civilization and refinement in this country, the increasing number of delinquent authors daily gibbeted for the edification of the public.

.....

Washington Irving
Retaliation

Of old, when Scarron his companions invited,
Each guest brought his dish, and the feast was united;
If our landlord supplies us with beef, and with fish,
Let each guest bring himself, and he brings the best dish:
.....
Oliver Goldsmith

Oliver Goldsmith
The Princess (part 2)

At break of day the College Portress came:
She brought us Academic silks, in hue
The lilac, with a silken hood to each,
And zoned with gold; and now when these were on,
.....
Alfred Lord Tennyson

Alfred Lord Tennyson
Grandfather Bridgeman

I

'Heigh, boys!' cried Grandfather Bridgeman, 'it's time before dinner to-day.'
He lifted the crumpled letter, and thumped a surprising 'Hurrah!'
.....
George Meredith

George Meredith
Pennsylvania Hall

NOT with the splendors of the days of old,
The spoil of nations, and barbaric gold;
No weapons wrested from the fields of blood,
Where dark and stern the unyielding Roman stood,
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
English Writers On America - Prose

Methinks I see in my mind a noble and puissant nation, rousting herself like a strong man after sleep, and shaking her invincible locks; methinks I see her as an eagle, mewing her mighty youth, and kindling her endazzled eyes at the full mid-day beam.
- MILTON ON THE LIBERTY OF THE PRESS.


.....

Washington Irving
The Torrent

OH torrent, roaring in thy giant fall,
And thund'ring grandly o'er th' opposing blocks,
Thy voice, far louder than the lion's call,
Through trackless forests shakes the heart of rocks,
.....

Mathilde Blind
The Author.[1]

Accursed the man, whom Fate ordains, in spite,
And cruel parents teach, to read and write!
What need of letters? wherefore should we spell?
Why write our names? A mark will do as well.
.....

Charles Churchill
The Ring And The Book

Do you see this Ring?
'Tis Rome-work, made to match
(By Castellani's imitative craft)
Etrurian circlets found, some happy morn,
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
The Borderers. A Tragedy

ACT I.

SCENE Road in a Wood.
WALLACE and LACY.
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Excursion - Book Second - The Solitary

In days of yore how fortunately fared
The Minstrel! wandering on from hall to hall,
Baronial court or royal; cheered with gifts
Munificent, and love, and ladies' praise;
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Pauline - A Fragment Of A Confession

Pauline, mine own, bend o'er me thy soft breast
Shall pant to mine bend o'er me thy sweet eyes,
And loosened hair, and breathing lips, arms
Drawing me to thee these build up a screen
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Truth.

Pensantur trutinë¢--Hor. Lib. ii. Ep. 1.



.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
In A Balcony

First part

Constance and Norbert

.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Poems - The New Edition - Preface

In two small volumes of Poems, published anonymously, one in 1849, the other in 1852, many of the Poems which compose the present volume have already appeared. The rest are now published for the first time.

I have, in the present collection, omitted the Poem from which the volume published in 1852 took its title. I have done so, not because the subject of it was a Sicilian Greek born between two and three thousand years ago, although many persons would think this a sufficient reason. Neither have I done so because I had, in my own opinion, failed in the delineation which I intended to effect. I intended to delineate the feelings of one of the last of the Greek religious philosophers, one of the family of Orpheus and Musaeus, having survived his fellows, living on into a time when the habits of Greek thought and feeling had begun fast to change, character to dwindle, the influence of the Sophists to prevail. Into the feelings of a man so situated there entered much that we are accustomed to consider as exclusively modern; how much, the fragments of Empedocles himself which remain to us are sufficient at least to indicate. What those who are familiar only with the great monuments of early Greek genius suppose to be its exclusive characteristics, have disappeared; the calm, the cheerfulness, the disinterested objectivity have disappeared: the dialogue of the mind with itself has commenced; modern problems have presented themselves; we hear already the doubts, we witness the discouragement, of Hamlet and of Faust.

.....
Matthew Arnold

Matthew Arnold
John Bull - Prose

An old song, made by an aged old pate,
Of an old worshipful gentleman who had a great estate,
That kept a brave old house at a bountiful rate,
And an old porter to relieve the poor at his gate.
.....

Washington Irving
The Princess (part Ii)

At break of day the College Portress came:
She brought us Academic silks, in hue
The lilac, with a silken hood to each,
And zoned with gold; and now when these were on,
.....
Alfred Lord Tennyson

Alfred Lord Tennyson
The Prophecy Of Famine

A SCOTS PASTORAL INSCRIBED TO JOHN WILKES, ESQ.

Nos patriam fugimus.--VIRGIL.

.....

Charles Churchill
Paracelsus: Part V: Paracelsus Attains

Scene. Salzburg; a cell in the Hospital of St. Sebastian. 1541.
Festus, Paracelsus.


.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Filippo Baldinucci On The Privilege Of Burial

A Reminiscence of A.D. 1676


"No, boy, we must not", so began
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
The Princess (part Iii)

Morn in the wake of the morning star
Came furrowing all the orient into gold.
We rose, and each by other drest with care
Descended to the court that lay three parts
.....
Alfred Lord Tennyson

Alfred Lord Tennyson
Marmion: Introduction To Canto I

November's sky is chill and drear,
November's leaf is red and sear:
Late, gazing down the steepy linn
That hems our little garden in,
.....

Walter Scott (sir)