GALLERY POEMS

This page is specially prepared for gallery poems. You can reach newest and popular gallery poems from this page. You can vote and comment on the gallery poems you read.

Fragment

At last I entered a long dark gallery,
Catacomb-lined; and ranged at the side
Were the bodies of men from far and wide
Who, motion past, were nevertheless not dead.
.....
Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy
The Colder The Air

We must admire her perfect aim,
this huntress of the winter air
whose level weapon needs no sight,
if it were not that everywhere
.....

Elizabeth Bishop
Consolation

Mist clogs the sunshine.
Smoky dwarf houses
Hem me round everywhere;
A vague dejection
.....
Matthew Arnold

Matthew Arnold
Elegy X

That some day, emerging at last from the terrifying vision
I may burst into jubilant praise to assenting angels!
That of the clear-struck keys of the heart not one may fail
to sound because of a loose, doubtful or broken string!
.....

Rainer Maria Rilke
A Song Of Painting: To General Cao Ba

You, General Cao Ba,
descendant of Cao Cao,
now live as a peasant,
a cold-door commoner.
.....

Du Fu
The Nightingale

NO easy matter 'tis to hold,
Against its owner's will, the fleece
Who troubled by the itching smart
Of Cupid's irritating dart,
.....

Jean De La Fontaine
The Seven Virgins

ALL under the leaves and the leaves of life
   I met with virgins seven,
And one of them was Mary mild,
   Our Lord's mother of Heaven.
.....

Anonymous
Awful Event.

Yes, Winchelsea (I tremble while I pen it),
Winehelsea's Earl hath cut the British Senate--
Hath said to England's Peers, in accent gruff,
"That for ye all"[snapping his fingers] and exit in a huff!
.....
Thomas Moore

Thomas Moore
Loitering With A Vacant Eye

Loitering with a vacant eye
Along the Grecian gallery,
And brooding on my heavy ill,
I met a statue standing still.
.....
A. E. Housman

A. E. Housman
An Actor

Some one ('tis hardly new) has oddly said
The color of a trumpet's blare is red;
And Joseph Emmett thinks the crimson shame
On woman's cheek a trumpet-note of fame.
.....

Ambrose Bierce
In A Whispering Gallery

That whisper takes the voice
Of a Spirit's compassionings
Close, but invisible,
And throws me under a spell
.....
Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy
Duino Elegies: The Tenth Elegy

That some day, emerging at last from the terrifying vision
I may burst into jubilant praise to assenting angels!
That of the clear-struck keys of the heart not one may fail
to sound because of a loose, doubtful or broken string!
.....

Rainer Maria Rilke
Tannhauser

To my mother. May, 1870.


The Landgrave Hermann held a gathering
.....
Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus
Trinity Sunday

If I have told you earthly things, and ye believe not, how shall ye
believe if I tell you of heavenly things? St. John iii. 12


.....
John Keble

John Keble
A Drawing In The Tate Gallery:

“The Man Who Taught Blake Painting in His Dreams”

is still around somewhere. Survived the smoke
and fires, the footsteps melting into stone,
.....

Jared Carter
The Venetian Girl's Evening Song.

Unmoor the skiff, - unmoor the skiff, -
The night wind's sigh is on the air,
And o'er the highest Alpine cliff,
The pale moon rises, broad and clear.
.....

George W. Sands
The Progress Of Marriage

Aetatis suae fifty-two,
A rich Divine began to woo
A handsome young imperious girl,
Nearly related to an Earl.
.....
Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift
Lara

LARA. [1]

CANTO THE FIRST.

.....

George Gordon Byron
Dion

. See Plutarch.
Serene, and fitted to embrace,
Where'er he turned, a swan-like grace
Of haughtiness without pretence,
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Babysitters

e sun flamed straight down that noon on the water off Marblehead.
That summer we wore black glasses to hide our eyes.
We were always crying, in our spare rooms, little put-upon sisters,
In the two, huge, white, handsome houses in Swampscott.
.....

Sylvia Plath
The Boy And The Angel

Morning, evening, noon and night,
``Praise God!; sang Theocrite.

Then to his poor trade he turned,
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Don Juan: Canto The Sixteenth

The antique Persians taught three useful things,
To draw the bow, to ride, and speak the truth.
This was the mode of Cyrus, best of kings--
A mode adopted since by modern youth.
.....

George Gordon Byron
Landscapes

The ridges either side of the valley
were covered in dark pine forest.
The ploughed hill sides were red,
and the pastures were very green.
.....

Lee Harwood
In A School Chapel

THE clear young voices rise and soar: 'Oh, pray
Pray for the peace of Jerusalem: they
Shall prosper that love thee.' Yet each boy's heart
Harbors the hope that he may have a part
.....

Alice Duer Miller
The Ghost

NOW that the curtains are drawn close
Now that the fire burns low,
And on her narrow bed the rose
Is stark laid out in snow;
.....
Edith Nesbit

Edith Nesbit
Tommy

I went into a public-'ouse to get a pint o' beer,
The publican 'e up an' sez, "We serve no red-coats here."
The girls be'ind the bar they laughed an' giggled fit to die,
I outs into the street again an' to myself sez I:
.....
Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
The Seven Virgins, A Carol

All under the leaves and the leaves of life
I met with virgins seven,
And one of them was Mary mild,
Our Lord's mother of Heaven.
.....

Anonymous
My Picture-gallery

In a little house keep I pictures suspended, it is not a fix'd house,
It is round, it is only a few inches from one side to the other;
Yet behold, it has room for all the shows of the world, all memories?
Here the tableaus of life, and here the groupings of death;
.....
Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman
The Municipal Gallery Revisited

I

Around me the images of thirty years:
An ambush; pilgrims at the water-side;
.....
William Butler Yeats

William Butler Yeats
The Boston Athenaeum

Thou dear and well-loved haunt of happy hours,
How often in some distant gallery,
Gained by a little painful spiral stair,
Far from the halls and corridors where throng
.....
Amy Lowell

Amy Lowell
Elegy Xvi: On His Mistress

By our first strange and fatal interview,
By all desires which thereof did ensue,
By our long starving hopes, by that remorse
Which my words' masculine persuasive force
.....
John Donne

John Donne
The Gift Of Harun Al-rashid

KUSTA BEN LUKA is my name, I write
To Abd Al-Rabban; fellow-roysterer once,
Now the good Caliph's learned Treasurer,
And for no ear but his.
.....
William Butler Yeats

William Butler Yeats
The Marksman

As the carriage traversed the wood he bade the driver draw up in the neighbourhood of a shooting gallery, saying that he would like to have a few shots to kill time. Is not the slaying of the monster Time the most ordinary and legitimate occupation of man?
So he gallantly offered his hand to his dear, adorable, and execrable wife; the mysterious woman to whom he owed so many pleasures, so many pains, and perhaps also a great part of his genius.
Several bullets went wide of the proposed mark, one of them flew far into the heavens, and as the charming creature laughed deliriously, mocking the clumsiness of her husband, he turned to her brusquely and said: "Observe that doll yonder, to the right, with its nose in the air, and with so haughty an appearance. Very well, dear angel, I will imagine to myself that it is you!"
He closed both eyes and pulled the trigger. The doll was neatly decapitated.
.....
Charles Baudelaire

Charles Baudelaire
Endimion And Phoebe (excerpts)

In Ionia whence sprang old poets' fame,
From whom that sea did first derive her name,
The blessed bed whereon the Muses lay,
Beauty of Greece, the pride of Asia,
.....
Michael Drayton

Michael Drayton
Orlando Furioso Canto 9

ARGUMENT
So far Orlando wends, he comes to where
He of old Proteus' hears the cruel use
But feels such pity for Olympia fair,
.....

Ludovico Ariosto
The Bridal Of Triermain

Introduction.

I.
Come Lucy! while 'tis morning hour
.....

Walter Scott (sir)
The Lady Of The Lake: Canto Vi. - The Guardroom

I.
The sun, awakening, through the smoky air
Of the dark city casts a sullen glance,
Rousing each caitiff to his task of care,
.....

Walter Scott (sir)
The Mellowing Of Joe

When the Laborites and Liberals are bickering,
Are a-calling and a-bawling in the House,
And the strangers in the gallery are snickering,
As the members rear on end and loudly 'rouse,'
.....

Clarence Michael James Stanislaus Dennis
Senlin, A Biography: Part 02: His Futile Preoccupations - 01

I am a house, says Senlin, locked and darkened,
Sealed from the sun with wall and door and blind.
Summon me loudly, and you'll hear slow footsteps
Ring far and faint in the galleries of my mind.
.....

Conrad Potter Aiken
Breitmann In Rome

Dere's lighds oopon de Appian,
Dey shine de road entlang;
Und from ein hundert tombs dere brumms
A wild Lateinisch song;
.....

Charles G. Leland
Lara. A Tale

The Serfs are glad through Lara's wide domain,
And slavery half forgets her feudal chain;
He, their unhoped, but unforgotten lord--
The long self-exiled chieftain is restored:
.....

George Gordon Byron
Marmion: Canto Ii. - The Convent

I.

The breeze, which swept away the smoke,
Round Norham Castle rolled,
.....
Sir Walter Scott

Sir Walter Scott
To A Friend

ON HER RETURN FROM EUROPE.

How smiled the land of France
Under thy blue eye's glance,
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
February

Begin, my muse, the imitative lay,
Aonian doxies sound the thrumming string;
Attempt no number of the plaintive Gay,
Let me like midnight cats, or Collins sing.
.....

Thomas Chatterton
The Lady Of Shalott (1832)

PART I
On either side the river lie
Long fields of barley and of rye,
That clothe the wold and meet the sky;
.....
Alfred Lord Tennyson

Alfred Lord Tennyson
Jubilate

"The very last time I ever was here," he said,
"I saw much less of the quick than I saw of the dead."
- He was a man I had met with somewhere before,
But how or when I now could recall no more.
.....
Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy
The Harp Of Hoel. Part Ii.

High on the hill, with moss o'ergrown,
A hermit chapel stood;
It spoke the tale of seasons gone,
And half-revealed its ivied stone.
.....

William Lisle Bowles
Childe Harold's Pilgrimage - Canto The Second.

I.

Come, blue-eyed maid of heaven! - but thou, alas,
Didst never yet one mortal song inspire -
.....

George Gordon Byron
Fixed Ideas

RANKS of electroplated cubes, dwindling to glitters,
Like the other pasture, the trigonometry of marble,
Death's candy-bed. Stone caked on stone,
Dry pyramids and racks of iron balls.
.....

Kenneth Slessor
The Empty Niche

A KING once made a gallery of art,
With portraits of dead friends and living graced;
And at the end, 'neath curtains drawn apart,
An empty marble pedestal was placed.
.....

John Boyle O'reilly