EVIL POEMS

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My Dream

So many times I thought about yesterday
A day that I was innocent in every way
When I was just a little girl who was playing all day
And just cried when someone ruined my day.
.....

Ma. Cristina Colima
Wormwood And Nightshade

The troubles of life are many,
The pleasures of life are few;
When we sat in the sunlight, Annie,
I dreamt that the skies were blue-
.....

Adam Lindsay Gordon
Suicide Note

SUICIDE NOTE
Part 1
Because of my cross, I find this life a misery
Like every cast in this dramatic adventure
.....

Okey Nwande
Vallabhbhai Patel

I remember the story of that great person
who fought for our freedom and was great,
who was against the partition
but not against the Muslim .
.....

Ankit Patel
Sonnet 144: Two Loves I Have, Of Comfort And Despair

Two loves I have, of comfort and despair,
Which like two spirits do suggest me still:
The better angel is a man right fair,
The worser spirit a woman coloured ill.
.....

William Shakespeare
Walt Whitman

I

I CELEBRATE myself;
And what I assume you shall assume;
.....

Walt Whitman
Lepanto

White founts falling in the courts of the sun,
And the Soldan of Byzantium is smiling as they run;
There is laughter like the fountains in that face of all men feared,
It stirs the forest darkness, the darkness of his beard,
.....

G. K. Chesterton
April

On Mondays I want to be with you, to fade away the sparkles of evil for the days to follow.
Cuddle with me at night and let us slowly lose ourselves.
Am I coward, April? Am I a coward, because of my inability to confess this all to you - to confess my feelings to you?
The countless thoughts that linger in my head make me think this won’t be right - okay.
.....

David Mavova
He Thinks Of Those Who Have Spoken Evil Of His Beloved

Half close your eyelids, loosen your hair,
And dream about the great and their pride;
They have spoken against you everywhere,
But weigh this song with the great and their pride;
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Complaint Of Lisa

There is no woman living that draws breath
So sad as I, though all things sadden her.
There is not one upon life's weariest way
Who is weary as I am weary of all but death.
.....

Algernon Charles Swinburne
The Giaour: A Fragment Of A Turkish Tale

No breath of air to break the wave
That rolls below the Athenian's grave,
That tomb which, gleaming o'er the cliff
First greets the homeward-veering skiff
.....

George Gordon Byron
Seth Compton

When I died, the circulating library
Which I built up for Spoon River,
And managed for the good of inquiring minds,
Was sold at auction on the public square,
.....

Edgar Lee Masters
September 1, 1939

I sit in one of the dives
On Fifty-second Street
Uncertain and afraid
As the clever hopes expire
.....

W. H. Auden
The Bishop Orders His Tomb

Vanity, saith the preacher, vanity!
Draw round my bed: is Anselm keeping back?
Nephews-sons mine-ah God, I know not! Well-
She, men would have to be your mother once,
.....

Robert Browning
Home Burial

He saw her from the bottom of the stairs
Before she saw him. She was starting down,
Looking back over her shoulder at some fear.
She took a doubtful step and then undid it
.....

Robert Frost
The Progress Of Poesy

Awake, Æolian lyre, awake,
And give to rapture all thy trembling strings.
From Helicon's harmonious springs
A thousand rills their mazy progress take:
.....

Thomas Gray
Hyperion: Book I

Deep in the shady sadness of a vale
Far sunken from the healthy breath of morn,
Far from the fiery noon, and eve's one star,
Sat gray-hair'd Saturn, quiet as a stone,
.....

John Keats
Hyperion: Book Ii

Just at the self-same beat of Time's wide wings
Hyperion slid into the rustled air,
And Saturn gain'd with Thea that sad place
Where Cybele and the bruised Titans mourn'd.
.....

John Keats
Sonnet 014: Not From The Stars Do I My Judgement Pluck

Not from the stars do I my judgement pluck,
And yet methinks I have astronomy-
But not to tell of good or evil luck,
Of plagues, of dearths, or seasons' quality;
.....

William Shakespeare
Sonnet 119: What Potions Have I Drunk Of Siren Tears

What potions have I drunk of Siren tears,
Distilled from limbecks foul as hell within,
Applying fears to hopes, and hopes to fears,
Still losing when I saw my self to win!
.....

William Shakespeare
Sonnet 121: Tis Better To Be Vile Than Vile Esteemed

'Tis better to be vile than vile esteemed
When not to be receives reproach of being,
And the just pleasure lost, which is so deemed
Not by our feeling, but by others' seeing.
.....

William Shakespeare
On Privilege

The rampant cane fields rife with disease,
the ocean carrying only shells to the altar,
a beach left to penitents, their easy sweat
cursing the sand that brought an increase
.....

C. Dale Young
Lines Written Among The Euganean Hills

Many a green isle needs must be
In the deep wide sea of Misery,
Or the mariner, worn and wan,
Never thus could voyage on-
.....

Percy Bysshe Shelley
Crossing Brooklyn Ferry

1
Flood-Tide below me! I see you face to face!
Clouds of the west-sun there half an hour high-I see you also face
to face.
.....

Walt Whitman
Song Of Myself

1
I celebrate myself, and sing myself,
And what I assume you shall assume,
For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.
.....

Walt Whitman
Christabel

PART I

'Tis the middle of night by the castle clock
And the owls have awakened the crowing cock;
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Fears In Solitude

Written in April 1798, during the alarm of an invasion

A green and silent spot, amid the hills,
A small and silent dell! O'er stiller place
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
France: An Ode

I

Ye clouds! that far above me float and pause,
Whose pathless march no mortal may control!
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The Dungeon

And this place our forefathers made for man!
This is the process of our love and wisdom,
To each poor brother who offends against us-
Most innocent, perhaps-and what if guilty?
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner

Part I

It is an ancient Mariner,
And he stoppeth one of three.
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
This Lime-tree Bower My Prison

[Addressed to Charles Lamb, of the India House, London]

In the June of 1797 some long-expected friends paid a visit
to the author's cottage; and on the morning of their arrival,
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
To The Rev. George Coleridge

Notus in fratres animi paterni.
Hor. Carm. lib.II.2.

A blesséd lot hath he, who having passed
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Character Of The Happy Warrior

Who is the happy Warrior? Who is he
That every man in arms should wish to be?
-It is the generous Spirit, who, when brought
Among the tasks of real life, hath wrought
.....

William Wordsworth
It Is Not To Be Thought Of

It is not to be thought of that the Flood
Of British freedom, which, to the open sea
Of the world's praise, from dark antiquity
Hath flowed, “with pomp of waters, unwithstood,”
.....

William Wordsworth
Lines Composed A Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, On Revisiting The Banks Of The Wye During A Tour. Ju

Five years have past; five summers, with the length
Of five long winters! and again I hear
These waters, rolling from their mountain-springs
With a soft inland murmur.-Once again
.....

William Wordsworth
Michael: A Pastoral Poem

If from the public way you turn your steps
Up the tumultuous brook of Green-head Ghyll,
You will suppose that with an upright path
Your feet must struggle; in such bold ascent
.....

William Wordsworth
Ode: Intimations Of Immortality From Recollections Of Early Childhood

The child is father of the man;
And I could wish my days to be
Bound each to each by natural piety.
(Wordsworth, “My Heart Leaps Up”)
.....

William Wordsworth
Song At The Feast Of Brougham Castle Upon The Restoration Of Lord Clifford, The Shepherd, To The Est

High in the breathless Hall the Minstrel sate,
And Emont's murmur mingled with the Song.-
The words of ancient time I thus translate,
A festal strain that hath been silent long:-
.....

William Wordsworth
The Old Cumberland Beggar

I saw an aged Beggar in my walk;
And he was seated, by the highway side,
On a low structure of rude masonry
Built at the foot of a huge hill, that they
.....

William Wordsworth
The Tables Turned

Up! up! my Friend, and quit your books;
Or surely you'll grow double:
Up! up! my Friend, and clear your looks;
Why all this toil and trouble?
.....

William Wordsworth
Growltiger’s Last Stand

GROWLTIGER was a Bravo Cat, who lived upon a barge;
In fact he was the roughest cat that ever roamed at large.
From Gravesend up to Oxford he pursued his evil aims,
Rejoicing in his title of “The Terror of the Thames.”
.....

T. S. Eliot
The Needle

Come, or the stellar tide will slip away.
Eastward avoid the hour of its decline,
Now! for the needle trembles in my soul!

.....

Ezra Pound
Holy Sonnet Vi: This Is My Play’s Last Scene, Here Heavens Appoint

This is my play's last scene, here heavens appoint
My pilgrimage's last mile; and my race
Idly, yet quickly run, hath this last pace,
My span's last inch, my minute's latest point,
.....

John Donne
The Wreck Of The Deutschland

To the
happy memory of five Franciscan Nuns
exiles by the Falk Laws
drowned between midnight and morning of
.....

Gerard Manley Hopkins
In The Moonlight

“O lonely workman, standing there
In a dream, why do you stare and stare
At her grave, as no other grave where there?”

.....

Thomas Hardy
A Prayer For My Daughter

Once more the storm is howling, and half hid
Under this cradle-hood and coverlid
My child sleeps on. There is no obstacle
But Gregory's wood and one bare hill
.....

William Butler Yeats
He Reproves The Curlew

O curlew, cry no more in the air,
Or only to the water in the West;
Because your crying brings to my mind
passion-dimmed eyes and long heavy hair
.....

William Butler Yeats
Man And The Echo

Man. In a cleft that's christened Alt
Under broken stone I halt
At the bottom of a pit
That broad noon has never lit,
.....

William Butler Yeats
Nineteen Hundred And Nineteen

I

Many ingenious lovely things are gone
That seemed sheer miracle to the multitude,
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Dolls

A doll in the doll-maker's house
Looks at the cradle and bawls:
‘That is an insult to us.'
But the oldest of all the dolls,
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Double Vision Of Michael Robartes

I

On the grey rock of Cashel the mind's eye
Has called up the cold spirits that are born
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Fiddler Of Dooney

When I play on my fiddle in Dooney.
Folk dance like a wave of the sea;
My cousin is priest in Kilvarnet,
My brother in Mocharabuiee.
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Host Of The Air

O'Driscoll drove with a song
The wild duck and the drake
From the tall and the tufted reeds
Of the drear Hart Lake.
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Lady’s Third Song

When you and my true lover meet
And he plays tunes between your feet.
Speak no evil of the soul,
Nor think that body is the whole,
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Tower

I

What shall I do with this absurdity-
O heart, O troubled heart-this caricature,
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Two Kings

King Eochaid came at sundown to a wood
Westward of Tara. Hurrying to his queen
He had outridden his war-wasted men
That with empounded cattle trod the mire,
.....

William Butler Yeats
To Some I Have Talked With By The Fire

While I wrought out these fitful Danaan rhymes,
My heart would brim with dreams about the times
When we bent down above the fading coals
And talked of the dark folk who live in souls
.....

William Butler Yeats
Vesperal

Strange grows the river on the sunless evenings!
The river comforts me, grown spectral, vague and dumb:
Long was the day; at last the consoling shadows come:
Sufficient for the day are the day's evil things!
.....

Ernest Dowson
Locksley Hall

Comrades, leave me here a little, while as yet ‘t is early morn:
Leave me here, and when you want me, sound upon the bugle-horn.

‘T is the place, and all around it, as of old, the curlews call,
.....

Alfred Lord Tennyson