CAPABLE POEMS

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Just Be You

Life is too short
Too short to be sad
Too short to rely on others approval
If they can't see it
.....
Eddah Ayuma

Eddah Ayuma
I Am Strong After All

Am in a realm I can't escape.
Having so many night mares am even afraid to sleep.
Have to wait for that superstitious time to pass.
It's perfect. Then i can sleep in and pretend am lazy and let everyone misjudge me.
.....
Purplestone Corner

Purplestone Corner
A Secret Gratitude

1
She cleaned house, and then lay down long
On the long stair.

.....

James Arlington Wright
The Progress Of Error.

Si quid loquar audiendam.--Hor. Lib. iv. Od. 2.



.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
Hyperion: Book I

Deep in the shady sadness of a vale
Far sunken from the healthy breath of morn,
Far from the fiery noon, and eve's one star,
Sat gray-hair'd Saturn, quiet as a stone,
.....
John Keats

John Keats
The Nightingale

A Conversation Poem, April, 1798

No cloud, no relique of the sunken day
Distinguishes the West, no long thin slip
.....
Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Hero And Leander: The First Sestiad

On Hellespont, guilty of true love's blood,
In view and opposite two cities stood,
Sea-borderers, disjoin'd by Neptune's might;
The one Abydos, the other Sestos hight.
.....
Christopher Marlowe

Christopher Marlowe
To Have Done Nothing

No that is not it
nothing that I have done
nothing
I have done
.....
William Carlos Williams

William Carlos Williams
The Song Of The Widow

In the beginning life was good to me;
it held me warm and gave me courage.
That this is granted all while in their youth,
how could I then have known of this.
.....

Rainer Maria Rilke
Let The Beasts Their Breath Resign

Let the beasts their breath resign,
Strangers to the life divine;
Who their God can never know,
Let their spirit downward go.
.....
Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley
Bel Canto

The sun is high, the seaside air is sharp,
And salty light reveals the Mayan School.
The Irish hope their names are on the harp,
We see the sheep's advertisement for wool,
.....

Kenneth Koch
The Three Voices

The First Voice

He trilled a carol fresh and free,
He laughed aloud for very glee:
.....
Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll
The Dream

I

Our life is twofold; Sleep hath its own world,
A boundary between the things misnamed
.....

George Gordon Byron
Go Greyhound

A few hours after Des Moines
the toilet overflowed.
This wasn't the adventure it sounds.

.....

Bob Hicok
Proem.

I only knew one poet in my life.
รข?? BROWNING.
I have not known a poet but myself,
If I'm indeed one, as I ought to be,
.....

Robert Crawford
The Odyssey: Book 1

Tell me, o muse, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wide
after he had sacked the famous town of Troy. Many cities did he visit,
and many were the nations with whose manners and customs he was
acquainted; moreover he suffered much by sea while trying to save
.....

Homer
The Animals That Noah Forgot: Foreward

The big white English swan, escaped from captivity, found himself swimming in an Australian waterhole fringed with giant gum trees. In one of the lower forks of a gum tree sat a placid ound-eyed elderly gentleman apparently thinking of nothing whatever, in other words, a native bear.

"Excuse me, sir," said the swan, "can you tell me where I am?"

.....

Banjo Paterson (andrew Barton)
The Divine Comedy By Dante: The Vision Of Paradise: Canto Vii

"Hosanna Sanctus Deus Sabaoth
Superillustrans claritate tua
Felices ignes horum malahoth!"
Thus chanting saw I turn that substance bright
.....

Dante Alighieri
The Divine Comedy By Dante: The Vision Of Paradise: Canto Iii

That sun, which erst with love my bosom warm'd
Had of fair truth unveil'd the sweet aspect,
By proof of right, and of the false reproof;
And I, to own myself convinc'd and free
.....

Dante Alighieri
The Spirit Of Discovery By Sea: A Descriptive And Historical Poem. - Introduction.[1]

I need not perhaps inform the reader, that I had before written a Canto on the subject of this poem; but I was dissatisfied with the metre, and felt the necessity of some connecting idea that might give it a degree of unity and coherence.

This difficulty I considered as almost inseparable from the subject; I therefore relinquished the design of making an extended poem on events, which, though highly interesting and poetical, were too unconnected with each other to unite properly in one regular whole. But on being kindly permitted to peruse the sheets of Mr Clarke's valuable work on the History of Navigation, I conceived (without supposing historically with him that all ideas of navigation were derived from the ark of Noah) that I might adopt the circumstance poetically, as capable of furnishing an unity of design; besides which, it had the advantage of giving a more serious cast and character to the whole.

.....

William Lisle Bowles
Philip Of Pokanoket - An Indian Memoir - Prose

As monumental bronze unchanged his look:
A soul that pity touch'd, but never shook;
Train'd from his tree-rock'd cradle to his bier,
The fierce extremes of good and ill to brook
.....

Washington Irving
Rural Life In England - Prose

Oh! friendly to the best pursuits of man,
Friendly to thought, to virtue and to peace,
Domestic life in rural pleasures past!
- COWPER.
.....

Washington Irving
English Writers On America - Prose

Methinks I see in my mind a noble and puissant nation, rousting herself like a strong man after sleep, and shaking her invincible locks; methinks I see her as an eagle, mewing her mighty youth, and kindling her endazzled eyes at the full mid-day beam.
- MILTON ON THE LIBERTY OF THE PRESS.


.....

Washington Irving
The Excursion - Book Ninth - Discourse Of The Wanderer, And An Evening Visit To The Lake

"To every Form of being is assigned,"
Thus calmly spake the venerable Sage,
"An 'active' Principle: howe'er removed
From sense and observation, it subsists
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Prelude - Book Ninth

RESIDENCE IN FRANCE

Even as a river, partly (it might seem)
Yielding to old remembrances, and swayed
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Prelude - Book Fourteenth

CONCLUSION

In one of those excursions (may they ne'er
Fade from remembrance!) through the Northern tracts
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Solomon On The Vanity Of The World, A Poem. In Three Books. - Power. Book Iii.

The Argument
Solomon considers man through the several stages and conditions of life, and concludes, in general, that we are all miserable. He reflects more particularly upon the trouble and uncertainty of greatness and power; gives some instances thereof from Adam down to himself; and still concludes that All Is Vanity. He reasons again upon life, death, and a future being; finds human wisdom too imperfect to resolve his doubts; has recourse to religion; is informed by an angel what shall happen to himself, his family, and his kingdom, till the redemption of Israel; and, upon the whole, resolves to submit his inquiries and anxieties to the will of his Creator.

Come then, my soul: I call thee by that name,
.....
Matthew Prior

Matthew Prior
Eureka - A Prose Poem (an Essay On The Material And Spiritual Universe)

It is with humility really unassumed, it is with a sentiment even of awe, that I pen the opening sentence of this work: for of all conceivable subjects I approach the reader with the most solemn, the most comprehensive, the most difficult, the most august.

What terms shall I find sufficiently simple in their sublimity -- sufficiently sublime in their simplicity, for the mere enunciation of my theme?

.....
Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe
Sir John Oldcastle, Lord Cobham

My friend should meet me somewhere hereabout
To take me to that hiding in the hills.

I have broke their cage, no gilded one, I trow--
.....
Alfred Lord Tennyson

Alfred Lord Tennyson
The Renewal

No more of sorrow, the world's old distress,
Nor war of thronging spirits numberless,
Immortal ardours in brief days confined,
No more the languid fever of mankind
.....

Robert Laurence Binyon
The Death Of Adam

Cedars, that high upon the untrodden slopes
Of Lebanon stretch out their stubborn arms,
Through all the tempests of seven hundred years
Fast in their ancient place, where they look down
.....

Robert Laurence Binyon
Westward

I found my Love among the fern. She slept.
My shadow stole across her, as I stept
More lightly and slowly, seeing her pillowed so
In the short--turfed and shelving green hollow
.....

Robert Laurence Binyon
When Old Wounds Bleed Again

When old wounds bleed again
In the silence of the night,
And mixt with sweet delight
Wells up the stream of pain,
.....

Robert Laurence Binyon
The Disappointment

1.

One Day the Amarous Lisander,
By an impatient Passion sway'd,
.....
Aphra Behn

Aphra Behn
All Is Vanity

I

How vain is Life! which rightly we compare
To flying Posts, that haste away;
.....

Anne Kingsmill Finch
The Franklin's Tale

'IN faith, Squier, thou hast thee well acquit,
And gentilly; I praise well thy wit,'
Quoth the Franklin; 'considering thy youthe
So feelingly thou speak'st, Sir, I aloue* thee, *allow, approve
.....
Geoffrey Chaucer

Geoffrey Chaucer
The Angel In The House. Book Ii. Canto Iii.

Preludes

I Love Ceremonious
Keep your undrest, familiar style
.....
Coventry Patmore

Coventry Patmore
Introductory 01

Laudation to the God of majesty and glory! Obedience to him is a cause of approach and gratitude in increase of benefits. Every inhalation of the breath prolongs life and every expiration of it gladdens our nature; wherefore every breath confers two benefits and for every benefit gratitude is due.

Whose hand and tongue is capable
To fulfil the obligations of thanks to him?
.....

Saadi Shirazi
Elegy With A Bridle In Its Hand

One was a bay cowhorse from Piedra & the other was a washed out palomino
And both stood at the rail of the corral & both went on aging
In each effortless tail swish, the flies rising, then congregating again

.....

Larry Levis
Poem Of Remembrance For A Girl Or A Boy

YOU just maturing youth! You male or female!
Remember the organic compact of These States,
Remember the pledge of the Old Thirteen thenceforward to the rights,
life, liberty, equality of man,
.....
Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman
The Lost Heir

'Oh where, and oh where
Is my bonny laddie gone?'
_Old Song_.

.....
Thomas Hood

Thomas Hood
A Song Of Joys

O to make the most jubilant song!
Full of music-full of manhood, womanhood, infancy!
Full of common employments-full of grain and trees.

.....
Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman
The Wind Is A Lady With

the wind is a Lady with
bright slender eyes(who

moves)at sunset
.....
E. E. Cummings

E. E. Cummings
The Cremona Violin: Part 02

Herr Concert-Meister Altgelt played,
And the four strings of his violin
Were spinning like bees on a day in Spring.
The notes rose into the wide sun-mote
.....
Amy Lowell

Amy Lowell
Variations Of An Air

Old King Cole
Was a merry old soul
And a merry old soul was he
He called for his pipe
.....
G. K. Chesterton

G. K. Chesterton
The Dream

I

Our life is twofold; Sleep hath its own world,
A boundary between the things misnamed
.....
George Gordon Lord Byron

George Gordon Lord Byron
The Jacquerie: A Fragment: Chapter Iv

Lord Raoul drew rein with all his company,
And urged his horse i' the crowd, to gain fair view
Of him that spoke, and stopped at last, and sat
Still, underneath where Gris Grillon was laid,
.....
Sidney Lanier

Sidney Lanier
The Terrible People

People who have what they want are very fond of telling people who haven't what they want that they really don't want it,
And I wish I could afford to gather all such people into a gloomy castle on the Danube and hire half a dozen capable Draculas to haunt it.
I dont' mind their having a lot of money, and I don't care how they employ it,
But I do think that they damn well ought to admit they enjoy it.
.....

Ogden Nash
The Comedian As The Letter C: 05 - A Nice Shady Home

Crispin as hermit, pure and capable,
Dwelt in the land. Perhaps if discontent
Had kept him still the pricking realist,
Choosing his element from droll confect
.....

Wallace Stevens
The Vision Of The Maid Of Orleans: The Third Book

The Maiden, musing on the Warrior's words,
Turn'd from the Hall of Glory. Now they reach'd
A cavern, at whose mouth a Genius stood,
In front a beardless youth, whose smiling eye
.....
Robert Southey

Robert Southey