PRIVILEGE POEMS

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The Super Hostess

It was as a little child
And one who was very shy
That I first looked at the sky.
Soon enough I started wondering and asking myself
.....
C K Rawat

C K Rawat
I Ment To Find Her When I Came;

I meant to find her when I came;
Death had the same design;
But the success was his, it seems,
And the discomfit mine.
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Absalom And Achitophel

In pious times, ere priest-craft did begin,
Before polygamy was made a sin;
When man, on many, multipli'd his kind,
Ere one to one was cursedly confin'd:
.....
John Dryden

John Dryden
The Working Monarch

Rising early in the morning,
We proceed to light the fire,
Then our Majesty adorning
In its work-a-day attire,
.....

William Schwenck Gilbert
I Would Not Paint'a Picture

505

I would not paint-a picture-
I'd rather be the One
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Differently The Same

One is black, one is white
together we are humans
one a leader, one a follower
together we are society
.....
Julius Terngu

Julius Terngu
Nursing

Nursing a pious profession,
Among all is a highest achievement,
Notion of benefiting all classes of people,
With love & compassions.
.....
Norbu Dorji

Norbu Dorji
Endymion: Book Iii

There are who lord it o'er their fellow-men
With most prevailing tinsel: who unpen
Their baaing vanities, to browse away
The comfortable green and juicy hay
.....
John Keats

John Keats
God's Gifts To Be Enjoyed

From God's all bounteous hand descend
Rare gifts in rich effusion,
And with those gifts no poisons blend,
Nor is their end delusion;
.....

Joseph Horatio Chant
A Hidden Life

Proudly the youth, sudden with manhood crowned,
Went walking by his horses, the first time,
That morning, to the plough. No soldier gay
Feels at his side the throb of the gold hilt
.....
George Macdonald

George Macdonald
Two-were Immortal Twice

800

Twoâ??were immortal twiceâ??
The privilege of fewâ??
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
There Is A Flower That Bees Prefer

380

There is a flower that Bees prefer-
And Butterflies-desire-
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Simplicity

It opens, the gate to the garden
with the docility of a page
that frequent devotion questions
and inside, my gaze
.....

Jorge Luis Borges
Go Plant A Tree

God, what a joy it is to plant a tree,
And from the sallow earth to watch it rise,
Lifting its emerald branches to the skies
In silent adoration; and to see
.....
Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
Tannhauser

To my mother. May, 1870.


The Landgrave Hermann held a gathering
.....
Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus
The Iliad Of Homer: Translated Into English Blank Verse: Book I.

Argument Of The First Book.


The book opens with an account of a pestilence that prevailed in the Grecian camp, and the cause of it is assigned. A council is called, in which fierce altercation takes place between Agamemnon and Achilles. The latter solemnly renounces the field. Agamemnon, by his heralds, demands Brisë is, and Achilles resigns her. He makes his complaint to Thetis, who undertakes to plead his cause with Jupiter. She pleads it, and prevails. The book concludes with an account of what passed in Heaven on that occasion.
.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
Christmas Eve

I

Out of the little chapel I burst
Into the fresh night-air again.
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Lancelot 07

All day the rain came down on Joyous Gard,
Where now there was no joy, and all that night
The rain came down. Shut in for none to find him
Where an unheeded log-fire fought the storm
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Ended, Ere It Begun'

1088

Ended, ere it begun-
The Title was scarcely told
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Otho The Great - Act Ii

SCENE I.
An Ante-chamber in the Castle.
Enter LUDOLPH and SIGIFRED.
Ludolph. No more advices, no more cautioning:
.....
John Keats

John Keats
Cardiac

A mattock high he swung;
I watched him at his toil;
With never gulp of lung
He gashed the ruddy soil.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
Rokeby: Canto V.

I.
The sultry summer day is done,
The western hills have hid the sun,
But mountain peak and village spire
.....
Sir Walter Scott

Sir Walter Scott
Politeness

The English and the French were met
Upon the field of future battle;
The foes were formidably set
And waiting for the guns to rattle;
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
The Three Taverns

When the brethren heard of us, they came to meet us
as far as Appii Forum, and The Three Taverns.
(Acts 28:15)

.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
A Poem Sacred To The Memory Of Sir Isaac Newton

Shall the great soul of Newton quit this earth,
To mingle with his stars; and every muse,
Astonish'd into silence, shun the weight
Of honours due to his illustrious name?
.....

James Thomson
Anniversary Poem

ONCE, more, dear friends, you meet beneath
A clouded sky:
Not yet the sword has found its sheath,
And on the sweet spring airs the breath
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
A Politician

Leader no more, be judged of us!
Hailed Chief, and loved, of yore-
Youth, and the faith of youth, cry out:
Leader and Chief no more!
.....
Don Marquis

Don Marquis
The Case Of Conscience

THOSE who in fables deal, bestow at ease
Both names and titles, freely as they please.
It costs them scarcely any thing, we find.
And each is nymph or shepherdess designed;
.....

Jean De La Fontaine
Book Fifth-books

WHEN Contemplation, like the night-calm felt
Through earth and sky, spreads widely, and sends deep
Into the soul its tranquillising power,
Even then I sometimes grieve for thee, O Man,
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Love And Honor

Sed neque Medorum silvae, ditissima terra
Nec pulcher Ganges, atque auro turbidus Haemus,
Laudibus Angligenum certent; non Bactra, nec Indi,
Totaque thuriferis Panchaia pinguis arenis.
.....

William Shenstone
Orpheus

Love will make men dare to die for their beloved. . . Of this
Alcestis is a monument . . . for she was willing to lay down her
life for her husband . . . and so noble did this appear to the gods
that they granted her the privilege of returning to earth . . . but
.....
Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton
Art

Give to barrows, trays, and pans
Grace and glimmer of romance;
Bring the moonlight into noon
Hid in gleaming piles of stone;
.....
Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson
On Privilege

The rampant cane fields rife with disease,
the ocean carrying only shells to the altar,
a beach left to penitents, their easy sweat
cursing the sand that brought an increase
.....

C. Dale Young
Sonnet 95: How Sweet And Lovely Dost Thou Make The Shame

How sweet and lovely dost thou make the shame
Which, like a canker in the fragrant rose,
Doth spot the beauty of thy budding name!
O, in what sweets dost thou thy sins enclose!
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
I Watched The Moon Around The House (629)

I watched the Moon around the House
Until upon a Pane --
She stopped -- a Traveller's privilege -- for Rest --
And there upon
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
The Claim

OH! I admit I'm dull and poor,
And plain and gloomy, as you tell me;
And dozens flock around your door
Who in all points but one excel me.
.....
Edith Nesbit

Edith Nesbit
Time, A Poem

Genius of musings, who, the midnight hour
Wasting in woods or haunted forests wild,
Dost watch Orion in his arctic tower,
Thy dark eye fix'd as in some holy trance;
.....

Henry Kirk White
A Question Of Privilege

Reported By Truthful James


It was Andrew Jackson Sutter who, despising Mr. Cutter for remarks
.....
Bret Harte

Bret Harte
Rejected

She says sheâ??s very sorry, as she sees you to the gate;
You calmly say â??Good-byeâ?? to her while standing off a yard,
Then you lift your hat and leave her, walking mighty stiff and straightâ??
But youâ??re hit, old manâ??hit hard.
.....
Henry Lawson

Henry Lawson
Prologue To Mallet's Mustapha

Since Athens first began to draw mankind,
To picture life, and show the impassion'd mind;
The truly wise have ever deem'd the stage
The moral school of each enlighten'd age.
.....

James Thomson
The Wishing Bridge

AMONG the legends sung or said
Along our rocky shore,
The Wishing Bridge of Marblehead
May well be sung once more.
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
A True Tale

A mother, who vast Pleasure finds
In modelling her Childrens Minds;
With whom, in exquisite Delight,
She passes many a Winter Night;
.....

Mary Barber
Laodamia

Vows have I made by fruitless hope inspired;
Of night, my slaughtered Lord have I required:
Restore him to my sight-great Jove, restore!”

.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Resolution And Independence

There was a roaring in the wind all night;
The rain came heavily and fell in floods;
But now the sun is rising calm and bright;
The birds are singing in the distant woods;
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Moon.

The moon was but a chin of gold
A night or two ago,
And now she turns her perfect face
Upon the world below.
.....

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson
Lohengrin

THE holy bell, untouched by human hands,
Clanged suddenly, and tolled with solemn knell.

Between the massive, blazoned temple-doors,
.....
Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus
Filippo Baldinucci On The Privilege Of Burial

A Reminiscence of A.D. 1676


"No, boy, we must not", so began
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Lines Composed A Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey

Five years have past; five summers, with the length
Of five long winters! and again I hear
These waters, rolling from their mountain-springs
With a soft inland murmur.-Once again
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Moon Was But A Chin Of Gold

737

The Moon was but a Chin of Gold
A Night or two ago-
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
He Parts Himself'like Leaves

517

He parts Himself-like Leaves-
And then-He closes up-
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson