PHYSICAL POEMS

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Graduating From Childhood

I realized with trepidation
that you fast growing up.
Soon you, and many of your generation
will graduate from childhood
.....
David Carolissen

David Carolissen
Leila

LEILA

Let me tell you the secret hidden
How to get closer to Leila, your beloved.
.....
Mohammad Younus

Mohammad Younus
How Many Times

How many times?

How many times does it get before it start to count?
He said it was needed just so she can fall in line
.....
Ademijuwon Adebagbo

Ademijuwon Adebagbo
Because You Were A Fool

To my childhood love....
How many times we stared at one another,
We smiled babishly but scared to touch,
We sat at angles we'd glance at the other,
.....
Elizabeth Makori

Elizabeth Makori
Timeless Beauty.

Summer comes with beautiful scenery,
Mother Earth shed her dress to turn green,
Flowers bloom to bear fruits to
Lose Her beauty in time.
.....
Norbu Dorji

Norbu Dorji
You Can't Can Love

I don't know how the fishes feel, but I can't help thinking it odd,
That a gay young flapper of a female eel should fall in love with a cod.
Yet-that's exactly what she did and it only goes to prove,
That' what evr you do you can't put the lid on that crazy feeling Love.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
Pain

Go away
Please don't hurt this much
I feel you
I'm young I can't bare now
.....
Zandy Nguta

Zandy Nguta
In Memory Of W.b. Yeats

I

He disappeared in the dead of winter:
The brooks were frozen, the airports almost deserted,
.....
W. H. Auden

W. H. Auden
Nobody Warned Me

Nobody told me the road will have so much pain
Nobody told me that love will leave me feeling this way
I always hear people talking about the pain of the physical kind
Nobody warned me about the emotional pain
.....
Zandy Nguta

Zandy Nguta
So We Were Poor...!

Yes we were poor, what da hell?
My parents could not read or write
It was a struggle to finish Matric with candle light.
When others kids could have their rapports signed
.....
David Carolissen

David Carolissen
Beauty

Disguised in physical appearance,
Never knowing what is inside,
They are the tricks of beauty,
Fooling the mind,
.....
Norbu Dorji

Norbu Dorji
Thousand Star Hotel, Hanoi

I.

Over the road from the three star Galaxy Hotel is our hotel,
the old park on Phan Dinh Phung Street,
.....

S. K. Kelen
Art Will Show To Eternity Your Soul

I am a woman, using a mirror everyday,
Like all of you, i'm seeing my reflection into it,
Even i am sad, happy, tired or bored,
What i'm seeing in my mirror it's my physical reality, my own truth.
.....
Cristina Teodor

Cristina Teodor
The Human Face

I. Soon

Of all the springtimes of the world
This one is the ugliest
.....

Paul Eluard
Pieta

A year ago you came
Early into the light.
You lived a day and night,
Then died; no one to blame.
.....

James Phillip Mcauley
Shadow.'a Parable

Yea! though I walk through the valley of the
Shadow.

‘Psalm of David'.
.....
Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe
Maurine: Part 06

There was a week of bustle and of hurry;
A stately home echoed to voices sweet,
Calling, replying; and to tripping feet
Of busy bridesmaids, running to and fro,
.....
Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
To Have Done Nothing

No that is not it
nothing that I have done
nothing
I have done
.....
William Carlos Williams

William Carlos Williams
On Seeing Larry Rivers' Washington Crossing The Delaware At The Museum Of Modern Art

Now that our hero has come back to us
in his white pants and we know his nose
trembling like a flag under fire,
we see the calm cold river is supporting
.....

Frank O'hara
The Woman

Go sleep, my sweetie-rest-rest!
Oh soft little hand on mother's breast!
Oh soft little lips-the din's mos' gone-
Over and done, my dearie one!
.....
Harriet Monroe

Harriet Monroe
Rum And Water

Stifling was the air, and heavy; blowflies buzzed and held a levee,
And the mid-day sun shone hot upon the plains of Bungaroo,
As Tobias Mathew Carey, a devout bush missionary,
Urged his broken-winded horse towards the township of Warhoo.
.....

Thomas E. Spencer
Sleep Spaces

In the night there are of course the seven wonders
of the world and the greatness tragedy and enchantment.
Forests collide with legendary creatures hiding in thickets.
There is you.
.....

Robert Desnos
Don Juan: Canto The Seventeenth

The world is full of orphans: firstly, those
Who are so in the strict sense of the phrase
(But many a lonely tree the loftier grows
Than others crowded in the forest's maze);
.....

George Gordon Byron
November

I stand so close to you,
Bundled in the chill of your touch.
Although physical, intellect storms above the horizon.

.....

Kewayne Wadley
The Columbiad: Book I

The Argument


Natives of America appear in vision. Their manners and characters. Columbus demands the cause of the dissimilarity of men in different countries, Hesper replies, That the human body is composed of a due proportion of the elements suited to the place of its first formation; that these elements, differently proportioned, produce all the changes of health, sickness, growth and decay; and may likewise produce any other changes which occasion the diversity of men; that these elemental proportions are varied, not more by climate than temperature and other local circumstances; that the mind is likewise in a state of change, and will take its physical character from the body and from external objects: examples. Inquiry concerning the first peopling of America. View of Mexico. Its destruction by Cortez. View of Cusco and Quito, cities of Peru. Tradition of Capac and Oella, founders of the Peruvian empire. Columbus inquires into their real history. Hesper gives an account of their origin, and relates the stratagems they used in establishing that empire.
.....

Joel Barlow
The Colloquy Of Monos And Una

[Greek: Mellonta sauta']

These things are in the future.

.....
Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe
Don Juan - Canto The Seventeenth.

The world is full of orphans: firstly, those
Who are so in the strict sense of the phrase
(But many a lonely tree the loftier grows
Than others crowded in the forest's maze);
.....

George Gordon Byron
The Divine Comedy By Dante: The Vision Of Paradise: Canto Xxiv

"O ye! in chosen fellowship advanc'd
To the great supper of the blessed Lamb,
Whereon who feeds hath every wish fulfill'd!
If to this man through God's grace be vouchsaf'd
.....

Dante Alighieri
The Spirit Of Discovery By Sea: Analysis.

Book The First.


The book opens with the resting of the Ark on the mountains of the great Indian Caucasus, considered by many authors as Ararat: the present state of the inhabited world, contrasted with its melancholy appearance immediately after the flood. The poem returns to the situation of our forefathers on leaving the ark; beautiful evening described. The Angel of Destruction appears to Noah in a dream, and informs him that although he and his family alone have escaped, the VERY ARK, which was the means of his present preservation, shall be the cause of the future triumph of Destruction.
.....

William Lisle Bowles
Sarah Walker

It was very hot. Not a breath of air was stirring throughout the western wing of the Greyport Hotel, and the usual feverish life of its four hundred inmates had succumbed to the weather. The great veranda was deserted; the corridors were desolated; no footfall echoed in the passages; the lazy rustle of a wandering skirt, or a passing sigh that was half a pant, seemed to intensify the heated silence. An intoxicated bee, disgracefully unsteady in wing and leg, who had been holding an inebriated conversation with himself in the corner of my window pane, had gone to sleep at last and was snoring. The errant prince might have entered the slumberous halls unchallenged, and walked into any of the darkened rooms whose open doors gaped for more air, without awakening the veriest Greyport flirt with his salutation. At times a drowsy voice, a lazily interjected sentence, an incoherent protest, a long-drawn phrase of saccharine tenuity suddenly broke off with a gasp, came vaguely to the ear, as if indicating a half-suspended, half-articulated existence somewhere, but not definite enough to indicate conversation. In the midst of this, there was the sudden crying of a child.

I looked up from my work. Through the camera of my jealously guarded window I could catch a glimpse of the vivid, quivering blue of the sky, the glittering intensity of the ocean, the long motionless leaves of the horse-chestnut in the road, all utterly inconsistent with anything as active as this lamentation. I stepped to the open door and into the silent hall.

.....

Bret Harte (francis)
Aspiring Miss De Laine

Certain facts which serve to explain
The physical charms of Miss Addie De Laine,
Who, as the common reports obtain,
Surpassed in complexion the lily and rose;
.....

Bret Harte (francis)
Traits Of Indian Character - Prose

"I appeal to any white man if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not to eat; if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not."
- Speech of an Indian Chief.


.....

Washington Irving
The Bermudas - A Shaksperian Research: - Prose

"Who did not think, till within these foure yeares, but that these islands had been rather a habitation for Divells, than fit for men to dwell in? Who did not hate the name, when hee was on land, and shun the place when he was on the seas? But behold the misprision and conceits of the world! For true and large experience hath now told us, it is one of the sweetest paradises that be upon earth."
- "A PLAINE DESCRIPT. OF THE BARMUDAS:" 1613.

In the course of a voyage home from England, our ship had been struggling, for two or three weeks, with perverse headwinds, and a stormy sea. It was in the month of May, yet the weather had at times a wintry sharpness, and it was apprehended that we were in the neighborhood of floating islands of ice, which at that season of the year drift out of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, and sometimes occasion the wreck of noble ships.
.....

Washington Irving
A New Pilgrimage: Sonnet V

The physical world itself is a fair thing
For who has eyes to see or ears to hear.
To--day I fled on my new freedom's wind,
With the first swallows of the parting year,
.....
Wilfrid Scawen Blunt

Wilfrid Scawen Blunt
The Love Sonnets Of Proteus. Part Ii: To Juliet: Xli

THE SAME CONTINUED
We may not meet. I could not for pride's sake
Dissemble further, and I suffer pain,
A palpable distinct and physical ache,
.....
Wilfrid Scawen Blunt

Wilfrid Scawen Blunt
The Columbiad: Book Ii

The Argument


Natives of America appear in vision. Their manners and characters. Columbus demands the cause of the dissimilarity of men in different countries, Hesper replies, That the human body is composed of a due proportion of the elements suited to the place of its first formation; that these elements, differently proportioned, produce all the changes of health, sickness, growth and decay; and may likewise produce any other changes which occasion the diversity of men; that these elemental proportions are varied, not more by climate than temperature and other local circumstances; that the mind is likewise in a state of change, and will take its physical character from the body and from external objects: examples. Inquiry concerning the first peopling of America. View of Mexico. Its destruction by Cortez. View of Cusco and Quito, cities of Peru. Tradition of Capac and Oella, founders of the Peruvian empire. Columbus inquires into their real history. Hesper gives an account of their origin, and relates the stratagems they used in establishing that empire.
.....

Joel Barlow
Because I Cannot Sleep

Because I cannot sleep
I make music at night.
I am troubled by the one
whose face has the color of spring flowers.
.....

Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi
Elegy With A Bridle In Its Hand

One was a bay cowhorse from Piedra & the other was a washed out palomino
And both stood at the rail of the corral & both went on aging
In each effortless tail swish, the flies rising, then congregating again

.....

Larry Levis
The Columbiad: Book Ix

The Argument


Vision suspended. Night scene, as contemplated from the mount of vision. Columbus inquires the reason of the slow progress of science, and its frequent interruptions. Hesper answers, that all things in the physical as well as the moral and intellectual world are progressive in like manner. He traces their progress from the birth of the universe to the present state of the earth and its inhabitants; asserts the future advancement of society, till perpetual peace shall be established. Columbus proposes his doubts; alleges in support of them the successive rise and downfal of ancient nations; and infers future and periodical convulsions. Hesper, in answer, exhibits the great distinction between the ancient and modern state of the arts and of society. Crusades. Commerce. Hanseatic League. Copernicus. Kepler. Newton, Galileo. Herschel. Descartes. Bacon. Printing Press. Magnetic Needle. Geographical discoveries. Federal system in America. A similar system to be extended over the whole earth. Columbus desires a view of this.
.....

Joel Barlow
The Golden Legend: Prologue & 1.

THE SPIRE OF STRASBURG CATHEDRAL.

Night and storm. LUCIFER, with the Powers of the
Air, trying to tear down the Cross.
.....
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Columbiad: Book Viii

The Argument


Hymn to Peace. Eulogy on the heroes slain in the war; in which the Author finds occasion to mention his Brother. Address to the patriots who have survived the conflict; exhorting them to preserve liberty they have established. The danger of losing it by inattention illustrated in the rape of the Golden Fleece. Freedom succeeding to Despotism in the moral world, like Order succeeding to Chaos in the physical world. Atlas, the guardian Genius of Africa, denounces to Hesper the crimes of his people in the slavery of the Afripans. The Author addresses his countrymen on that subject, and on the principles of their government.
.....

Joel Barlow
Gregory Corso

Budger of history Brake of time You Bomb
Toy of universe Grandest of all snatched sky I cannot hate you
Do I hate the mischievous thunderbolt the jawbone of an ass
The bumpy club of One Million B.C. the mace the flail the axe
.....

Gregory Corso
Seasonal Cycle - Chapter 01 - Summer

"Oh, dear, this utterly sweltering season of the highly rampant sun is drawing nigh, and it will always be good enough to go on taking daytime baths, as the lakes and rivers will still be with plenteous waters, and at the end of the day, nightfall will be pleasant with fascinating moon, and in such nights Love-god can somehow be almost mollified...[who tortured us in the previous vernal season... but now without His sweltering us, we can happily enjoy the nights devouring cool soft drinks and dancing and merrymaking in outfields...]

"Oh, beloved one, somewhere the moon shoved the blackish columns of night aside, somewhere else the palace-chambers with water [showering, sprinkling and splashing] machines are highly exciting, and else where the matrices of gems, [like coolant pearls and moon-stone, etc.,] are there, and even the pure sandalwood is liquefied [besides other coolant scents,] thus this season gets an adoration from all the people...

.....

Kalidasa
Esther, A Sonnet Sequence: Xxviii

The summer I had passed in my own fashion
High in the Alps, a proselyte to toil.
I was released and free, and spent my passion
On the bare rocks as on a fruitful soil.
.....
Wilfrid Scawen Blunt

Wilfrid Scawen Blunt
Light Breeze

As regards feeling pain, like a hand cut in battle,
consider the body a robe you wear.


.....

Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi
The Human Music

At evening when the aspens rustled soft
And the last blackbird by the hedge-nest laughed,
And through the leaves the moon's unmeaning face
Looked, and then rose in dark-blue leafless space;
.....

John Freeman
The Power Of Words

‘Oinos.'

Pardon, Agathos, the weakness of a spirit new-fledged with
immortality!
.....
Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe
The Fish

wade
through black jade.
Of the crow-blue mussel-shells, one keeps
adjusting the ash-heaps;
.....
Marianne Moore

Marianne Moore
Aspiring Miss De Laine

A Chemical Narrative


Certain facts which serve to explain
.....
Bret Harte

Bret Harte
The Bean Field

…but infinities also passed out of this life,
not having any witnesses, how, when, or in
what manner they departed.
-Boccaccio, The Decameron
.....

Jocelyn Emerson