FEATURE POEMS

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My Idol(ms. Twinkle Dua)

One who always is the best,
Who takes me to a beautiful fest.
A lot more than just a teacher,
Her smile and nature is her best feature.
.....
Priyadarshini Goel

Priyadarshini Goel
Bundle Of Joy

Fruits of labor come in hand
With vast treasures across the land
It commence in a story
Full of joy work hand in hand
.....
Jenny Aduana-doinog

Jenny Aduana-doinog
The Holy Fair

A note of seeming truth and trust
Hid crafty observation;
And secret hung, with poison'd crust,
The dirk of defamation:
.....
Robert Burns

Robert Burns
The Sonnets Cxiii - Since I Left You, Mine Eye Is In My Mind

Since I left you, mine eye is in my mind;
And that which governs me to go about
Doth part his function and is partly blind,
Seems seeing, but effectually is out;
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
An Inspiring Teacher (ms. Neetu Sharma)

A marvellous, awesome teacher,
With the most brilliant feature.
Love you to moon and back,
There is nothing you lack.
.....
Priyadarshini Goel

Priyadarshini Goel
Prothalamion

Calme was the day, and through the trembling ayre
Sweete-breathing Zephyrus did softly play
A gentle spirit, that lightly did delay
Hot Titans beames, which then did glyster fayre;
.....
Edmund Spenser

Edmund Spenser
Heredity

I am the family face;
Flesh perishes, I live on,
Projecting trait and trace
Through time to times anon,
.....
Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy
Deluded Swain, The Pleasure.

I.

Deluded swain, the pleasure
The fickle fair can give thee,
.....
Robert Burns

Robert Burns
Introduction: Pippa Passes

New Year's Day at Asolo in the Trevisan


Scene.-
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
The Vision

THE SUN had clos'd the winter day,
The curless quat their roarin play,
And hunger'd maukin taen her way,
To kail-yards green,
.....
Robert Burns

Robert Burns
The Night Before

Look you, Dominie; look you, and listen!
Look in my face, first; search every line there;
Mark every feature,-chin, lip, and forehead!
Look in my eyes, and tell me the lesson
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
She Says She Loves Me Best Of A'.

Tune - "Onagh's Waterfall."


I.
.....
Robert Burns

Robert Burns
On The Portrait Of Two Beautiful Young People

A Brother and Sister

O I admire and sorrow! The heart's eye grieves
Discovering you, dark tramplers, tyrant years.
.....
Gerard Manley Hopkins

Gerard Manley Hopkins
To The Pious Memory Of The Accomplished Young Lady Mrs. Anne Killigrew

Thou youngest virgin-daughter of the skies,
Made in the last promotion of the Blest;
Whose palms, new pluck'd from Paradise,
In spreading branches more sublimely rise,
.....
John Dryden

John Dryden
The Iliad (bk I)

Sing, O goddess, the anger of Achilles son of Peleus, that brought countless ills upon the Achaeans. Many a brave soul did it send hurrying down to Hades, and many a hero did it yield a prey to dogs and vultures, for so were the counsels of Jove fulfilled from the day on which the son of Atreus, king of men, and great Achilles, first fell out with one another.

And which of the gods was it that set them on to quarrel? It was the son of Jove and Leto; for he was angry with the king and sent a pestilence upon the host to plague the people, because the son of Atreus had dishonoured Chryses his priest. Now Chryses had come to the ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, and had brought with him a great ransom: moreover he bore in his hand the sceptre of Apollo wreathed with a suppliant's wreath and he besought the Achaeans, but most of all the two sons of Atreus, who were their chiefs.

.....

Homer
The Iliad Of Homer: Translated Into English Blank Verse: Book I.

Argument Of The First Book.


The book opens with an account of a pestilence that prevailed in the Grecian camp, and the cause of it is assigned. A council is called, in which fierce altercation takes place between Agamemnon and Achilles. The latter solemnly renounces the field. Agamemnon, by his heralds, demands Brisë is, and Achilles resigns her. He makes his complaint to Thetis, who undertakes to plead his cause with Jupiter. She pleads it, and prevails. The book concludes with an account of what passed in Heaven on that occasion.
.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
Progress In The Pacific

Lapp'd in blue Pacific waters lies an isle of green and gold,
A garden of enchantment such as Eden was of old;
And the innocent inhabitants, pure children of the sun,
Resembled those of Eden, tooâ??in more respects than one.
.....

James Brunton Stephens
The Shield Of Achilles

She looked over his shoulder
For vines and olive trees,
Marble well-governed cities
And ships upon untamed seas,
.....
W. H. Auden

W. H. Auden
Some Days

Some days I put the people in their places at the table,
bend their legs at the knees,
if they come with that feature,
and fix them into the tiny wooden chairs.
.....

Billy Collins
Body Shop

When I come in, my mechanic is eating
lunch. He doesn't look over the top
of his newspaper.
I glance around, hoping that Miss July
.....

Ronald Koertge
The Hermit

Far in a wild, unknown to public view,
From youth to age a rev'rend hermit grew;
The moss his bed, the cave his humble cell,
His food the fruits, his drink the crystal well:
.....
Thomas Parnell

Thomas Parnell
The Defence

Piensan los Enamorados
Que tienen los otros, los oios quebranta dos.

Why slightest thou what I approve?
.....

Henry King
The Irish Mother In The Penal Days

Now welcome, welcome, baby-boy, unto a mother's fears,
The pleasure of her sufferings, the rainbow of her tears,
The object of your father's hope, in all he hopes to do,
A future man of his own land, to live him o'er anew!
.....
John Banim

John Banim
Translation Of The Romaic Song

I enter thy garden of roses,
Beloved and fair Haidée,
Each morning where Flora reposes,
For surely I see her in thee.
.....

George Gordon Byron
Sonnet Xxi

WAs it the worke of nature or of Art?
which tempred so the feature of her face:
that pride and meeknesse mixt by equall part,
doe both appeare t'adorne her beauties grace.
.....
Edmund Spenser

Edmund Spenser
To James Smith.

"Friendship! mysterious cement of the soul!
Sweet'ner of life and solder of society!
I owe thee much!"

.....
Robert Burns

Robert Burns
The Courtship Of Young John

Fields of lucerne and waving wheat,
White-washed sheds, and cottage neat,
Nesting orchards and mulberry trees,
Scented flowers round hives of bees,
.....

Alice Guerin Crist
Orpheus

ORPHEUS.
LAUGHTER and dance, and sounds of harp and lyre,
Piping of flutes, singing of festal songs,
Ribbons of flame from flaunting torches, dulled
.....
Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus
History

Here, peradventure, in this mirror glassed,
Who gazes long and well at times beholds
Some sunken feature of the mummied Past,
But oftener only the embroidered folds
.....

William Watson
Tale Xvii

RESENTMENT.

Females there are of unsuspicious mind,
Easy and soft and credulous and kind;
.....
George Crabbe

George Crabbe
John Marr And Other Sailors

Since as in night's deck-watch ye show,
Why, lads, so silent here to me,
Your watchmate of times long ago?
Once, for all the darkling sea,
.....
Herman Melville

Herman Melville
Tale X

THE LOVER'S JOURNEY.

It is the Soul that sees: the outward eyes
Present the object, but the Mind descries;
.....
George Crabbe

George Crabbe
Tale Viii

THE MOTHER.

There was a worthy, but a simple Pair,
Who nursed a Daughter, fairest of the fair:
.....
George Crabbe

George Crabbe
Tale I

That all men would be cowards if they dare,
Some men we know have courage to declare;
And this the life of many a hero shows,
That, like the tide, man's courage ebbs and flows:
.....
George Crabbe

George Crabbe
Prince Dorus

In days of yore, as Ancient Stories tell,
A King in love with a great Princess fell.
Long at her feet submiss the Monarch sigh'd,
While she with stern repulse his suit denied.
.....
Charles Lamb

Charles Lamb
Sonnet Cxiii

Since I left you, mine eye is in my mind;
And that which governs me to go about
Doth part his function and is partly blind,
Seems seeing, but effectually is out;
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
The Question

Beside us in our seeking after pleasures,
Through all our restless striving after fame,
Thorough all our search for worldly gains and treasures
There walketh one whom no man likes to name.
.....
Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
Cymru

Dim in the mist of ages, seeking a resting-place,
Broke on the shores of Britain the wave of an Aryan race.
Clear throâ?? the mist of ages, ere ever the White Christ came,
Songs of the Cymric singers have chanted the Brython fame.
.....

George Essex Evans
Hermes

Soothsay. Behold, with rod twy-serpented,
Hermes the prophet, twining in one power
The woman with the man. Upon his head
The cloudy cap, wherewith he hath in dower
.....
Francis Thompson

Francis Thompson
The Sinner And The Spider

Sinner.

What black, what ugly crawling thing art thou?

.....
John Bunyan

John Bunyan
My Love

SHE has tender eyes that tell
All her prim, set lips suppressâ??
Daring thoughts that ever dwell
Prisoned in her bashfulness;
.....

Arthur Henry Adams
Emblems

A STREAMLET is a bright and beauteous creature
In some wide desert, where it keeps apart
Of each wayfarerâ??s heart:
The Star of Evening is a gracious feature,
.....

Charles Harpur
Sonnet 113: Since I Left You, Mine Eye Is In My Mind

Since I left you, mine eye is in my mind,
And that which governs me to go about
Doth part his function, and is partly blind,
Seems seeing, but effectually is out;
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
The Cynotaph,

Poor Tray charmant!
Poor Tray de mon Ami!
-- Dog-bury, and Vergers.

.....

Richard Harris Barham
Shall I Wasting In Despair

Shall I wasting in despair
Die because a woman's fair?
Or make pale my cheeks with care
'Cause another's rosy are?
.....
George Wither

George Wither
To What Serves Mortal Beauty?

To what serves mortal beauty ‘-dangerous; does set danc-
ing blood-the O-seal-that-so ‘ feature, flung prouder form
Than Purcell tune lets tread to? ‘See: it does this: keeps warm
Men's wits to the things that are;' what good means-where a glance
.....
Gerard Manley Hopkins

Gerard Manley Hopkins
In Winter In My Room

1670

In Winter in my Room
I came upon a Worm-
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Epigrams

'Tis human fortune's happiest height to be
A spirit melodious, lucid, poised, and whole;
Second in order of felicity
I hold it, to have walk'd with such a soul.
.....

William Watson
The Iliad: Book 1

Sing, O goddess, the anger of Achilles son of Peleus, that brought
countless ills upon the Achaeans. Many a brave soul did it send
hurrying down to Hades, and many a hero did it yield a prey to dogs
and vultures, for so were the counsels of Jove fulfilled from the
.....

Homer
The Iliad: Book 01

Sing, O goddess, the anger of Achilles son of Peleus, that brought
countless ills upon the Achaeans. Many a brave soul did it send
hurrying down to Hades, and many a hero did it yield a prey to dogs
and vultures, for so were the counsels of Jove fulfilled from the
.....

Homer