TURBULENCE POEMS

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Vengeance

*VENGEANCE*
*NATURES TOOK UP ARMS*

Suddenly, the sun went abode
.....
Paciolo Pen Saint

Paciolo Pen Saint
Heliograph

(Self-Portrait) Omens and Astrology. A desert flat and undisturbed, stupid and forlorn. Sunless. a caravan of failures. Pons Asinorum and the Feast of the Ass and revolt against standardized American childhood.
War and Violence.
Catapults and Torches and the first stray thrusts of Sun into the Soul. Bombardments and Bordels. Heraldry and High Walls. Too rigid to crumble but not too strong to fracture.

.....

Harry Crosby
Character Of The Happy Warrior

Who is the happy Warrior? Who is he
That every man in arms should wish to be?
-It is the generous Spirit, who, when brought
Among the tasks of real life, hath wrought
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Marburg

I quivered. I flared up, and then was extinguished.
I shook. I had made a proposal - but late,
Too late. I was scared, and she had refused me.
I pity her tears, am more blessed than a saint.
.....
Boris Pasternak

Boris Pasternak
The Happy Husband

Oft, oft, methinks, the while with thee
I breathe, as from the heart, thy dear
And dedicated bame, I hear
A promise and a mystery,
.....
Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Fragments - Lines 0219 - 0220

Do not distress yourself too much at the turbulence of your fellow citizens,
Kyrnos, but walk down the middle of the road, as I do.


.....

Theognis
O Nightingale My Heart

O Nightingale my heart
How sad thou art!
How heavy is thy wing,
Desperately whirrëd that thy throat may fling
.....

Robert Nichols
Of Any Old Man

Wreck not the ageing heart of quietness,
With alien uproar and rude jolly cries,
Which satyr like to a mild maidens pride,
Ripens not wisdom, but a large recoil,
.....
Isaac Rosenberg

Isaac Rosenberg
The Psoriad

The King of Scotland, years and years ago,
Convened his courtiers in a gallant row
And thus addressed them:

.....

Ambrose Bierce
Owls

Under black yew-trees, in the shade,
The owls have kept themselves apart;
Like strange divinities, they dart
The red eye, as they meditate.
.....
Charles Baudelaire

Charles Baudelaire
The Sage And The Woman

‘Twixt ancient Beersheba and Dan
Another such a caravan
Dazed Palestine had never seen
As that which bore Sabea's queen
.....
Don Marquis

Don Marquis
A Garden-seat At Home

Oh, no; I would not leave thee, my sweet home,
Decked with the mantling woodbine and the rose,
And slender woods that the still scene inclose,
For yon magnificent and ample dome
.....

William Lisle Bowles
The Comedian As The Letter C: 01 - The World Without Imagination

Nota: man is the intelligence of his soil,
The sovereign ghost. As such, the Socrates
Of snails, musician of pears, principium
And lex. Sed quaeritur: is this same wig
.....

Wallace Stevens
Address To Kilchurn Castle, Upon Loch Awe

CHILD of loud-throated War! the mountain Stream
Roars in thy hearing; but thy hour of rest
Is come, and thou art silent in thy age;
Save when the wind sweeps by and sounds are caught
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Before The Throne Of Beauty Xxvi

One heavy day I ran away from the grim face of society and the dizzying clamor of the city and directed my weary step to the spacious alley. I pursued the beckoning course of the rivulet and the musical sounds of the birds until I reached a lonely spot where the flowing branches of the trees prevented the sun from the touching the earth.

I stood there, and it was entertaining to my soul - my thirsty soul who had seen naught but the mirage of life instead of its sweetness.

.....

Khalil Gibran
The Cloud Messenger - Part 01

A certain yaksha who had been negligent in the execution of his own duties,
on account of a curse from his master which was to be endured for a year and
which was onerous as it separated him from his beloved, made his residence
among the hermitages of Ramagiri, whose waters were blessed by the bathing
.....

Kalidasa
Camperdown

The dignity of Camperdown
Is not to be denied,
Where Leura looks upon the town
And that lush countryside
.....

Clarence Michael James Stanislaus Dennis
The Magi

Now as at all times I can see in the mind's eye,
In their stiff, painted clothes, the pale unsatisfied ones
Appear and disappear in the blue depth of the sky
With all their ancient faces like rain-beaten stones,
.....
William Butler Yeats

William Butler Yeats
Dargo

Dargo is a dark-haired lass
Prone to independent ways;
Few men know her, fewer pass,
Where her pleasant river plays
.....

Clarence Michael James Stanislaus Dennis
The Sibyls

Rending the waters of a night unknown
The ship with tireless pulses bore me,
On the shadowy deck musing late and lone,
Over waste ocean.
.....

Robert Laurence Binyon
The Waggoner - Canto Third

Right gladly had the horses stirred,
When they the wished-for greeting heard,
The whip's loud notice from the door,
That they were free to move once more.
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Excursion - Book Seventh - The Churchyard Among The Mountains - (continued)

While thus from theme to theme the Historian passed,
The words he uttered, and the scene that lay
Before our eyes, awakened in my mind
Vivid remembrance of those long-past hours;
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Memorials Of A Tour In Scotland, 1803 Ix. Address To Kilchurn Castle, Upon Loch Awe

Child of loud-throated War! the mountain Stream
Roars in thy hearing; but thy hour of rest
Is come, and thou art silent in thy age;
Save when the wind sweeps by and sounds are caught
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
September 1819

The sylvan slopes with corn-clad fields
Are hung, as if with golden shields,
Bright trophies of the sun!
Like a fair sister of the sky,
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The River Duddon - A Series Of Sonnets, 1820. - Xv - From This Deep Chasm

From this deep chasm, where quivering sunbeams play
Upon its loftiest crags, mine eyes behold
A gloomy Niche, capacious, blank, and cold;
A concave free from shrubs and mosses grey;
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Excursion - Book First - The Wanderer

'Twas summer, and the sun had mounted high:
Southward the landscape indistinctly glared
Through a pale steam; but all the northern downs,
In clearest air ascending, showed far off
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
To John C. Fremont

Thy error, Fremont, simply was to act
A brave man's part, without the statesman's tact,
And, taking counsel but of common sense,
To strike at cause as well as consequence.
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
The Field Of Waterloo

I.

Fair Brussels, thou art far behind,
Though, lingering on the morning wind,
.....

Walter Scott (sir)
The Invitation To The Voyage

It is a superb land, a country of Cockaigne, as they say, that I dream of visiting with an old friend. A strange land, drowned in our northern fogs, that one might call the East of the West, the China of Europe; a land patiently and luxuriously decorated with the wise, delicate vegetations of a warm and capricious phantasy.
A true land of Cockaigne, where all is beautiful, rich, tranquil, and honest; where luxury is pleased to mirror itself in order; where life is opulent, and sweet to breathe; from whence disorder, turbulence, and the unforeseen are excluded; where happiness is married to silence; where even the food is poetic, rich and exciting at the same time; where all things, my beloved, are like you.
Do you know that feverish malady that seizes hold of us in our cold miseries; that nostalgia of a land unknown; that anguish of curiosity? It is a land
which resembles you, where all is beautiful, rich, tranquil and honest, where phantasy has built and decorated an occidental China, where life is sweet to breathe, and happiness married to silence. It is there that one would live; there that one would die.
.....
Charles Baudelaire

Charles Baudelaire
The Ragman's Wine

Often, beneath a street lamp's reddish light,
Where wind torments the glass and flame by night,
Where mankind swarms in stormy turbulence
Within a suburb's muddy labyrinth,
.....
Charles Baudelaire

Charles Baudelaire
In Memory Of John Fairfax

Because this man fulfilled his days,
Like one who walks with steadfast gaze
Averted from forbidden ways
With lures of fair, false flowerage deep,
.....

Henry Kendall
Two Songs From A Play

I

I saw a staring virgin stand
Where holy Dionysus died,
.....
William Butler Yeats

William Butler Yeats
A Dream Child

Where tides of tossed wistaria bloom
Foam up in purple turbulence,
Where twining boughs have built a room
And wing'd winds pause to garner scents
.....
Don Marquis

Don Marquis
Unto Thee I

unto thee i
burn incense
the bowl crackles
upon the gloom arise purple pencils
.....
E. E. Cummings

E. E. Cummings
Remorse

Away! the moor is dark beneath the moon,
Rapid clouds have drunk the last pale beam of even:
Away! the gathering winds will call the darkness soon,
And profoundest midnight shroud the serene lights of heaven.
.....
Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley
Humanity's Stream

I stood upon a crowded thoroughfare,
Within a city's confines, where were met
All classes and conditions, and surveyed,
From a secluded niche or aperture,
.....

Alfred Castner King
Metabole

An Apostrophe To The Moon.


O, silvery moon, fair mistress of the night,
.....

Alfred Castner King
Childhood, A Poem: Part Ii

There are who think that Childhood does not share
With age the cup, the bitter cup, of care:
Alas! they know not this unhappy truth,
That every age, and rank, is born to ruth.
.....

Henry Kirk White
From -odi Barbare�

XXIV
What is far hence led to the den of making:
Moves unlike wildfire | not so simple-happy
Ploughman hammers ploughshare his durum dentem
.....

Geoffrey Hill
Queen Mab: Part Vi (excerpts)

"Throughout these infinite orbs of mingling light,
Of which yon earth is one, is wide diffus'd
A Spirit of activity and life,
That knows no term, cessation, or decay;
.....
Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley
Duncan, An Ode

I.

Abash'd the rebel squadrons yield--
MACBETH , the victor of the field,
.....

Helen Maria Williams
Stanzas. -- April, 1814

Away! the moor is dark beneath the moon,
Rapid clouds have drank the last pale beam of even:
Away! the gathering winds will call the darkness soon,
And profoundest midnight shroud the serene lights of heaven.
.....
Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley
Homer's Battle Of The Frogs And Mice. Book Iii

Now Front to Front the marching Armies shine,
Halt e'er they meet, and form the length'ning Line,
The Chiefs conspicuous seen, and heard afar,
Give the loud Sign to loose the rushing War;
.....
Thomas Parnell

Thomas Parnell
To Stella, Who Collected And Transcribed His Poems

As, when a lofty pile is raised,
We never hear the workmen praised,
Who bring the lime, or place the stones;
But all admire Inigo Jones:
.....
Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift
Ballarat

The digger's cultured daughter:
Her youth was wildly free.
Now by the placid water
Of tree-girt Wendouree
.....

Clarence Michael James Stanislaus Dennis
The Four Seasons : Winter

See, Winter comes, to rule the varied year,
Sullen and sad, with all his rising train;
Vapours, and clouds, and storms. Be these my theme,
These! that exalt the soul to solemn thought,
.....

James Thomson
The Journey

Snake River Country

I now remembered slowly how I came,
I, sometime living, sometime with a name,
.....

Yvor Winters
To John C. Freemont

THY error, Frémont, simply was to act
A brave man's part, without the statesman's tact,
And, taking counsel but of common sense,
To strike at cause as well as consequence.
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
An Ode In Time Of Inauguration

(March 4, 1913)


Thine aid, O Muse, I consciously beseech;
.....

Franklin Pierce Adams
Bacchus Marsh

Here she bides, a buxom lady,
Blest by peace and great content;
Dwelling by her byways shady,
Where the elm trees boughs are bent;
.....

Clarence Michael James Stanislaus Dennis