ISSUE POEMS

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Apostrophe To Man

(On reflecting that the world
is ready to go to war again)

Detestable race, continue to expunge yourself, die out.
.....
Edna St. Vincent Millay

Edna St. Vincent Millay
Sonnet 013: O, That You Were Your Self! But, Love, You Are

O, that you were your self! But, love, you are
No longer yours than you yourself here live.
Against this coming end you should prepare,
And your sweet semblance to some other give.
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Waring

I

What's become of Waring
Since he gave us all the slip,
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Any Wife To Any Husband

I

My love, this is the bitterest, that thou
Who art all truth and who dost love me now
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Venus And Adonis

Even as the sun with purple-coloured face
Had ta'en his last leave of the weeping morn,
Rose-cheeked Adonis hied him to the chase;
Hunting he loved, but love he laughed to scorn.
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Absalom And Achitophel

In pious times, ere priest-craft did begin,
Before polygamy was made a sin;
When man, on many, multipli'd his kind,
Ere one to one was cursedly confin'd:
.....
John Dryden

John Dryden
Letter To Maria Gisborne

The spider spreads her webs, whether she be
In poet's tower, cellar, or barn, or tree;
The silk-worm in the dark green mulberry leaves
His winding sheet and cradle ever weaves;
.....
Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley
Prothalamion

Calme was the day, and through the trembling ayre
Sweete-breathing Zephyrus did softly play
A gentle spirit, that lightly did delay
Hot Titans beames, which then did glyster fayre;
.....
Edmund Spenser

Edmund Spenser
Dejection: An Ode

Late, late yestreen I saw the new moon,
With the old moon in her arms;
And I fear, I fear, my master dear!
We shall have a deadly storm.
.....
Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Locksley Hall Sixty Years After

Late, my grandson! half the morning have I paced these sandy tracts,
Watch'd again the hollow ridges roaring into cataracts,

Wander'd back to living boyhood while I heard the curlews call,
.....
Alfred Lord Tennyson

Alfred Lord Tennyson
The Temple Of Friendship

Sacred to peace, within a wood's recess,
A blest retreat, where courtiers never press,
A temple stands, where art did never try
With pompous wonders to enchant the eye;
.....
Voltaire

Voltaire
Endymion: Book Iii

There are who lord it o'er their fellow-men
With most prevailing tinsel: who unpen
Their baaing vanities, to browse away
The comfortable green and juicy hay
.....
John Keats

John Keats
To Spring

O thou with dewy locks, who lookest down
Through the clear windows of the morning, turn
Thine angel eyes upon our western isle,
Which in full choir hails thy approach, O Spring!
.....
William Blake

William Blake
An Octopus

of ice. Deceptively reserved and flat,
it lies “in grandeur and in mass”
beneath a sea of shifting snow-dunes;
dots of cyclamen-red and maroon on its clearly defined
.....
Marianne Moore

Marianne Moore
To Morning

O holy virgin! clad in purest white,
Unlock heav'n's golden gates, and issue forth;
Awake the dawn that sleeps in heaven; let light
Rise from the chambers of the east, and bring
.....
William Blake

William Blake
The Odyssey: Book 03

But as the sun was rising from the fair sea into the firmament of
heaven to shed Blight on mortals and immortals, they reached Pylos the
city of Neleus. Now the people of Pylos were gathered on the sea shore
to offer sacrifice of black bulls to Neptune lord of the Earthquake.
.....

Homer
Satire Iii

Kind pity chokes my spleen; brave scorn forbids
Those tears to issue which swell my eyelids;
I must not laugh, nor weep sins and be wise;
Can railing, then, cure these worn maladies?
.....
John Donne

John Donne
A Beautiful Young Nymph Going To Bed

Corinna, Pride of Drury-Lane,
For whom no Shepherd sighs in vain;
Never did Covent Garden boast
So bright a batter'd, strolling Toast;
.....
Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift
A Democratic Hymn

Republicans of differing views
Are pro or con protection;
If that's the issue they would choose,
Why, we have no objection.
.....
Eugene Field

Eugene Field
Ch 04 On The Advantages Of Silence Story 05

Galenus saw a fool hanging on with his hands to the collar of a learned man and insulting him, whereon he said: â??If he were learned he would not have come to this pass with an ignorant man.â??

Two wise men do not contend and quarrel
Nor does a scholar fight with a contemptible fellow.
.....

Saadi Shirazi
An Angel In The House

How sweet it were, if without feeble fright,
Or dying of the dreadful beauteous sight,
An angel came to us, and we could bear
To see him issue from the silent air
.....
James Henry Leigh Hunt

James Henry Leigh Hunt
The Odyssey: Book 7

Thus, then, did Ulysses wait and pray; but the girl drove on to
the town. When she reached her father's house she drew up at the
gateway, and her brothers- comely as the gods- gathered round her,
took the mules out of the waggon, and carried the clothes into the
.....

Homer
The Sonnets Xcvii - How Like A Winter Hath My Absence Been

How like a winter hath my absence been
From thee, the pleasure of the fleeting year!
What freezings have I felt, what dark days seen!
What old December's bareness everywhere!
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Regardin' Terry Hut

Sence I tuk holt o' Gibbses' Churn
And be'n a-handlin' the concern,
I've travelled round the grand old State
Of Indiany, lots, o' late--!
.....

James Whitcomb Riley
Sonnet 097: How Like A Winter Hath My Absence Been

How like a winter hath my absence been
From thee, the pleasure of the fleeting year!
What freezings have I felt, what dark days seen!
What old December's bareness everywhere!
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
The Iliad: Book 15

But when their flight had taken them past the trench and the set
stakes, and many had fallen by the hands of the Danaans, the Trojans
made a halt on reaching their chariots, routed and pale with fear.
Jove now woke on the crests of Ida, where he was lying with
.....

Homer
Stars Over The Dordogne

Stars are dropping thick as stones into the twiggy
Picket of trees whose silhouette is darker
Than the dark of the sky because it is quite starless.
The woods are a well. The stars drop silently.
.....

Sylvia Plath
Laodamia

Vows have I made by fruitless hope inspired;
Of night, my slaughtered Lord have I required:
Restore him to my sight-great Jove, restore!”

.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Battle Of Salamis

The night was passing, and the Grecian host
By no means sought to issue forth unseen.
But when indeed the day with her white steeds
Held all the earth, resplendent to behold,
.....

Aeschylus
The Odyssey: Book 07

Thus, then, did Ulysses wait and pray; but the girl drove on to
the town. When she reached her father's house she drew up at the
gateway, and her brothers-comely as the gods-gathered round her,
took the mules out of the waggon, and carried the clothes into the
.....

Homer
Sonnet Xcvii

How like a winter hath my absence been
From thee, the pleasure of the fleeting year!
What freezings have I felt, what dark days seen!
What old December's bareness every where!
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Mud

Mud is Beauty in the making,
Mud is melody awaking;
Laughter, leafy whisperings,
Butterflies with rainbow wings;
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
Moeurs Contemporaines

I

Mr. Styrax 1
Mr. Hecatomb Styrax, the owner of a large estate and of large muscles,
.....
Ezra Pound

Ezra Pound
A Song Of French Roads

Now praise the Gods of Time and Chance
That bring a heart's desire,
And lay the joyous roads of France
Once more beneath the tyre,
.....
Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
The Iliad: Book 17

Brave Menelaus son of Atreus now came to know that Patroclus had
fallen, and made his way through the front ranks clad in full armour
to bestride him. As a cow stands lowing over her first calf, even so
did yellow-haired Menelaus bestride Patroclus. He held his round
.....

Homer
On A Fork Of Byron's

Like any other fork.â??No mark you meet with
To point some psychological conceit with.
An ordinary fork. A fork to eat with.

.....

James Brunton Stephens
An Appeal To End Appeals

Sir, - I try to do my duty as a patriotic man
With sane views about the science of gastronomy;
And I'd ask the promulgators of each food consuming plan
To consider man's interior economy.
.....

Clarence Michael James Stanislaus Dennis
Passion

They say passion is that thing you find joy when you do
They say passion is a fire it ignite the inside of you
Until it controls you
And becomes you
.....
Joy Chinweze

Joy Chinweze
Of Judgement

As 'tis appointed men should die,
So judgment is the next
That meets them most assuredly;
For so saith holy text.
.....
John Bunyan

John Bunyan
Mary Smith

Away down East where I was reared amongst my Yankee kith,
There used to live a pretty girl whose name was Mary Smith;
And though it's many years since last I saw that pretty girl,
And though I feel I'm sadly worn by Western strife and whirl;
.....
Eugene Field

Eugene Field
The Odyssey: Book 18

Now there came a certain common tramp who used to go begging all
over the city of Ithaca, and was notorious as an incorrigible
glutton and drunkard. This man had no strength nor stay in him, but he
was a great hulking fellow to look at; his real name, the one his
.....

Homer
Lancelot

Gawaine, aware again of Lancelot
In the Kingâ??s garden, coughed and followed him;
Whereat he turned and stood with folded arms
And weary-waiting eyes, cold and half-closedâ??
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Unarmed Combat

In due course of course you will all be issued with
Your proper issue; but until tomorrow,
You can hardly be said to need it; and until that time,
We shall have unarmed combat. I shall teach you.
.....

Henry Reed
An Anniversary On The Hymeneals Of My Noble Kinsman, Tho. S

I.
The day is curl'd about agen
To view the splendor she was in;
When first with hallow'd hands
.....
Richard Lovelace

Richard Lovelace
It Is You

It is you, it is you, poor better thoughts!
The needful hope, shame for the ancient blots,
Heart's gentleness with mind's severity,
And vigilance, and calm, and constancy,
.....
Paul Verlaine

Paul Verlaine
Hero's Lamp

That lamp thou fill'st in Eros name to-night,
O Hero, shall the Sestian augurs take
To-morrow, and for drowned Leander's sake
To Anteros its fireless lip shall plight.
.....
Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Dante Gabriel Rossetti
Elegy Xii

COME Fates ; I fear you not ! All whom I owe
Are paid, but you ; then 'rest me ere I go.
But Chance from you all sovereignty hath got ;
Love woundeth none but those whom Death dares not ;
.....
John Donne

John Donne
My Springs

In the heart of the Hills of Life, I know
Two springs that with unbroken flow
Forever pour their lucent streams
Into my soul's far Lake of Dreams.
.....
Sidney Lanier

Sidney Lanier
Louisa To Strephon

Ah! Strephon, how can you despise
Her, who without thy pity dies!
To Strephon I have still been true,
And of as noble blood as you;
.....
Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift
Anniversary Poem

ONCE, more, dear friends, you meet beneath
A clouded sky:
Not yet the sword has found its sheath,
And on the sweet spring airs the breath
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier