INVENT POEMS

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Auguries Of Innocence

To see a world in a grain of sand
And a heaven in a wild flower,
Hold infinity in the palm of your hand
And eternity in an hour.
.....
William Blake

William Blake
A Plea

Why need we newer arms invent,
Poor peoples to destroy?
With what we have let's be content
And perfect their employ.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
The Rewards Of Industry

A FRIEND of mine said yesterday: 'There goes a man across the way
Who paid ten thousand dollars for a home a week ago;
He owns an automobile now, a saddle horse and keeps a cow,
And smokes cigars at fifty cents a throw.
.....
Edgar Albert Guest

Edgar Albert Guest
Things Ended

Engulfed by fear and suspicion,
mind agitated, eyes alarmed,
we try desperately to invent ways out,
plan how to avoid
.....

Constantine P. Cavafy
The Suicide's Argument

Ere the birth of my life, if I wished it or no
No question was asked me--it could not be so !
If the life was the question, a thing sent to try
And to live on be YES; what can NO be ? to die.
.....
Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Sonnet 038: How Can My Muse Want Subject To Invent

How can my Muse want subject to invent
While thou dost breathe, that pour'st into my verse
Thine own sweet argument, too excellent
For every vulgar paper to rehearse?
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Truth

Man, on the dubious waves of error toss'd,
His ship half founder'd, and his compass lost,
Sees, far as human optics may command,
A sleeping fog, and fancies it dry land;
.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
The Legacy

My dearest Love! when thou and I must part,
And th' icy hand of death shall seize that heart
Which is all thine; within some spacious will
Ile leave no blanks for Legacies to fill:
.....

Henry King
The Will

Before I sigh my last gasp, let me breathe,
Great Love, some legacies ; I here bequeath
Mine eyes to Argus, if mine eyes can see ;
If they be blind, then, Love, I give them thee ;
.....
John Donne

John Donne
Dear Lorca

Dear Lorca,

These letters are to be as temporary as our poetry is to be permanent. They will establish the bulk, the wastage that my sour-stomached contemporaries demand to help them swallow and digest the pure word. We will use up our rhetoric here so that it will not appear in our poems. Let it be consumed paragraph by paragraph, day by day, until nothing of it is left in our poetry and nothing of our poetry is left in it. It is precisely because these letters are unnecessary that they must be written.
In my last letter I spoke of the tradition. The fools that read these letters will think by this we mean what tradition seems to have meant latelyâ??an historical patchwork (whether made up of Elizabethan quotations, guide books of the poetâ??s home town, or obscure bits of magic published by Pantheon) which is used to cover up the nakedness of the bare word. Tradition means much more than that. It means generations of different poets in different countries patiently telling the same story, writing the same poem, gaining and losing something with each transformationâ??but, of course, never really losing anything. This has nothing to do with calmness, classicism, temperament, or anything else. Invention is merely the enemy of poetry.
.....

Jack Spicer
Admetus

To my friend, Ralph Waldo Emerson.


He who could beard the lion in his lair,
.....
Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus
The Progress Of Error.

Si quid loquar audiendam.--Hor. Lib. iv. Od. 2.



.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
Sonnet Xxxviii: How Can My Muse Want Subject To Invent

How can my muse want subject to invent,
While thou dost breathe, that pour'st into my verse
Thine own sweet argument, too excellent
For every vulgar paper to rehearse?
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Ode To Salvador Dali

A rose in the high garden you desire.
A wheel in the pure syntax of steel.
The mountain stripped bare of Impressionist fog,
The grays watching over the last balustrades.
.....

Federico Garcà­a Lorca
Hypocrite Auteur

mon semblable, mon frère
(1)
Our epoch takes a voluptuous satisfaction
In that perspective of the action
.....
Archibald Macleish

Archibald Macleish
Sonnet 079: Whilst I Alone Did Call Upon Thy Aid

Whilst I alone did call upon thy aid,
My verse alone had all thy gentle grace,
But now my gracious numbers are decayed,
And my sick Muse doth give an other place.
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Sonnet 79: Whilst I Alone Did Call Upon Thy Aid

Whilst I alone did call upon thy aid,
My verse alone had all thy gentle grace,
But now my gracious numbers are decayed,
And my sick Muse doth give an other place.
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Lamia

Part 1

Upon a time, before the faery broods
Drove Nymph and Satyr from the prosperous woods,
.....
John Keats

John Keats
The Leaders Of The Crowd

They must to keep their certainty accuse
All that are different of a base intent;
Pull down established honour; hawk for news
Whatever their loose fantasy invent
.....
William Butler Yeats

William Butler Yeats
Drury-lane Prologue Spoken By Mr. Garrick

1 When Learning's triumph o'er her barb'rous foes
2 First rear'd the stage, immortal Shakespear rose;
3 Each change of many-colour'd life he drew,
4 Exhausted worlds, and then imagin'd new:
.....
Samuel Johnson

Samuel Johnson
Beer

1 In those old days which poets say were golden --
2 (Perhaps they laid the gilding on themselves:
3 And, if they did, I'm all the more beholden
4 To those brown dwellers in my dusty shelves,
.....

Charles Stuart Calverley
Dear Keats

Already six years past your age!
The steps in Rome,
the house near Hampstead Heath,
& all your fears
.....

Erica Jong
Magpiety

The same and not quite the same, I walked through oak forests
Amazed that my Muse, Mnemosyne,
Has in no way diminished my amazement.
A magpie was screeching and I said: Magpiety?
.....

Czeslaw Milosz
Friendship

Friend!--the Great Ruler, easily content,
Needs not the laws it has laborious been
The task of small professors to invent;
A single wheel impels the whole machine
.....

Friedrich Schiller
The May Night

MUSE.
Give me a kiss, my poet, take thy lyre;
The buds are bursting on the wild sweet-briar.
To-night the Spring is born-the breeze takes fire.
.....
Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus
The Old Guitar

Neglected now is the old guitar
And moldering into decay;
Fretted with many a rift and scar
That the dull dust hides away,
.....

James Whitcomb Riley
The Padlock

I triumphed, love's victorious power
Prevailed, and near approached the hour
Which should have crowned our mutual flame,
Just then your tyrant husband came.
.....
Voltaire

Voltaire
Lancelot

Gawaine, aware again of Lancelot
In the Kingâ??s garden, coughed and followed him;
Whereat he turned and stood with folded arms
And weary-waiting eyes, cold and half-closedâ??
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Very Like A Whale

One thing that literature would be greatly the better for
Would be a more restricted employment by the authors of simile and
metaphor.
Authors of all races, be they Greeks, Romans, Teutons or Celts,
.....

Ogden Nash
A Sort Of A Song

Let the snake wait under
his weed
and the writing
be of words, slow and quick, sharp
.....
William Carlos Williams

William Carlos Williams
The Given Love

I'LL on; for what should hinder me
From loving and enjoying thee?
Thou canst not those exceptions make,
Which vulgar, sordid mortals takeâ??
.....
Abraham Cowley

Abraham Cowley
An Ode : On Exodus Iii. 14

On Exodus iii. 14. 'I am that I am.'

Man! foolish man!
Scarce know'st thou how thyself began,
.....
Matthew Prior

Matthew Prior
Custer: Book Third

I

As in the long dead days marauding hosts
Of Indians came from far Siberian coasts,
.....
Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
The Execution Of James Graham, Marquis Of Montrose

'Twas in the year of 1650, and on the twenty-first of May,
The city of Edinburgh was put into a state of dismay
By the noise of drums and trumpets, which on the air arose,
That the great sound attracted the notice of Montrose.
.....

William Topaz Mcgonagall
Punch Song (to Be Sung In The Northern Countries)

On the mountain's breezy summit,
Where the southern sunbeams shine,
Aided by their warming vigor,
Nature yields the golden wine.
.....

Friedrich Schiller
Ode 1957: An Intellectual

An intellectual is all the time showing off.

Lovers dissolve and become bewildered.

.....

Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi
At The Feast

EVOLVING, changing, onwards still we press--
We must advance, invent, construct, possess;
No matter what a price we have to pay,
We must obtain perfection, and no less--
.....
Edith Nesbit

Edith Nesbit
A Plea

Why need we newer arms invent,
Poor peoples to destroy?
With what we have let's be content
And perfect their employ.
.....

Robert William Service
The Two Voices

A still small voice spake unto me,
"Thou art so full of misery,
Were it not better not to be?"

.....
Alfred Lord Tennyson

Alfred Lord Tennyson
St. George And The Dragon

Of Hector's deeds did Homer sing,
And of the sack of stately Troy,
What griefs fair Helena did bring,
Which was Sir Paris' only joy:
.....

Anonymous Olde English
Jerusalem Delivered - Book 05 - Part 02

XVII

This barbarous prince, who only vainly
That in wealth and kingly power doth lie,
.....

Torquato Tasso
Paradise Regained - The First Book

I who e're while the happy Garden sung,
By one mans disobedience lost, now sing
Recover'd Paradise to all mankind,
By one mans firm obedience fully tri'd
.....
John Milton

John Milton
Eureka - A Prose Poem (an Essay On The Material And Spiritual Universe)

It is with humility really unassumed, it is with a sentiment even of awe, that I pen the opening sentence of this work: for of all conceivable subjects I approach the reader with the most solemn, the most comprehensive, the most difficult, the most august.

What terms shall I find sufficiently simple in their sublimity -- sufficiently sublime in their simplicity, for the mere enunciation of my theme?

.....
Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe
And Must I Sing?

And must I sing? what subject shall I chuse?
Or whose great name in Poets heaven use?
For the more countenance to my active Muse?

.....
Ben Jonson

Ben Jonson
The Fair Rosamond

You've heard of King Henry II
And the story of how he got fond
Of one of his customer's daughters,
A lass called the "Fair Rosamond."
.....

Marriott Edgar
The Prelude - Book First

INTRODUCTION CHILDHOOD AND SCHOOL-TIME

Oh there is blessing in this gentle breeze,
A visitant that while it fans my cheek
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Sonnets Lxxix - Whilst I Alone Did Call Upon Thy Aid

Whilst I alone did call upon thy aid,
My verse alone had all thy gentle grace;
But now my gracious numbers are decay'd,
And my sick Muse doth give an other place.
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Paradise Lost - Book Vi

All night the dreadless Angel unpursu'd
Through Heav'ns wide Champain held his way, till Morn,
Wak't by the circling Hours, with rosie hand
Unbarr'd the gates of Light. There is a Cave
.....
John Milton

John Milton
Prologue To "limberham."

True wit has seen its best days long ago;
It ne'er look'd up, since we were dipp'd in show:
When sense in doggerel rhymes and clouds was lost,
And dulness flourish'd at the actors' cost.
.....
John Dryden

John Dryden
To Mr. Delany,[1]

OCT. 10, 1718 NINE IN THE MORNING

To you whose virtues, I must own
With shame, I have too lately known;
.....
Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift