CAPTIVITY POEMS

This page is specially prepared for captivity poems. You can reach newest and popular captivity poems from this page. You can vote and comment on the captivity poems you read.

Endymion: Book Iii

There are who lord it o'er their fellow-men
With most prevailing tinsel: who unpen
Their baaing vanities, to browse away
The comfortable green and juicy hay
.....
John Keats

John Keats
Song Of The Engines

We now, held in captivity,
Spring to our labours nor greive!
See now, how it is a blesseder,
Brothers, to give than to receive!
.....
Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
They Shut Me Up In Prose

613

They shut me up in Prose-
As when a little Girl
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Christmas Eve

I

Out of the little chapel I burst
Into the fresh night-air again.
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Otho The Great - Act Ii

SCENE I.
An Ante-chamber in the Castle.
Enter LUDOLPH and SIGIFRED.
Ludolph. No more advices, no more cautioning:
.....
John Keats

John Keats
Epigrams

'Tis human fortune's happiest height to be
A spirit melodious, lucid, poised, and whole;
Second in order of felicity
I hold it, to have walk'd with such a soul.
.....

William Watson
Last Man, The

All worldly shapes shall melt in gloom,
The Sun himself must die,
Before this mortal shall assume
Its Immortality!
.....

Thomas Campbell
The Princes' Quest - Part The Seventh

But Sleep, who makes a mist about the sense,
Doth ope the eyelids of the soul, and thence
Lifteth a heavier cloud than that whereby
He veils the vision of the fleshly eye.
.....

William Watson
Elegy Iii: Change

Although thy hand and faith, and good works too,
Have sealed thy love which nothing should undo,
Yea though thou fall back, that apostasy
Confirm thy love; yet much, much I fear thee.
.....
John Donne

John Donne
Captivity

The lion remembers the forest,
The lion in chains;
To the bird that is captive a vision
Of woodland remains.
.....

Amy Levy
Captivity

O meadow lark, so wild and free,
It cannot be, it cannot be,
That men to merchandise your spell
Do close you in a wicker hell!
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
My White Mouse

At dusk I saw a craintive mouse
That sneaked and stole around the house;
At first I took it for a ghost,
For it was snowy white-almost.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
Home 2

Fair was the morning, fair our tempers, and
We had seen nothing fairer than that land,
Though strange, and the untrodden snow that made
Wild of the tame, casting out all that was
.....

Edward Thomas
The Last Man

All worldly shapes shall melt in gloom,
The Sun himself must die,
Before this mortal shall assume
Its Immortality!
.....

Thomas Campbell
Lochiel's Warning

Wizard. - Lochiel.

Wizard.
- Lochiel! Lochiel, beware of the day
.....

Thomas Campbell
Pangs Of Slavery.

In an inky room,
Blank in black sights,
Captivity reigns in a a Nebuchadnezzar-like manner,
Oozing around in low tunes and hurtful lyrics,
.....
Akinloye Emmanuel

Akinloye Emmanuel
Amoretti Lxviii: Most Glorious Lord Of Life

Most glorious Lord of life, that on this day,
Didst make thy triumph over death and sin:
And having harrow'd hell, didst bring away
Captivity thence captive, us to win:
.....
Edmund Spenser

Edmund Spenser
Manasseh

Manasseh, lord of Judah, and the son
Of him who, favoured of Jehovah, saw
At midnight, when the skies were flushed with fire,
The splendid mystery of the shining air,
.....

Henry Kendall
Samson Agonistes (excerpts)

[Samson's Opening Speech]
A little onward lend thy guiding hand
To these dark steps, a little further on;
For yonder bank hath choice of sun or shade,
.....
John Milton

John Milton
Ch 07 On The Effects Of Education Story 05

The son of a pious man inherited great wealth left him by some uncles, whereon he plunged into dissipation and profligacy, became a spendthrift and, in short, left no heinous transgression unperpetrated and no intoxicant untasted. I advised him and said: â??My son, income is a flowing water and expense a turning mill; that is to say, only he who has a fixed revenue is entitled to indulge in abundant expenses.

â??If thou hast no income, spend but frugally
Because the sailors chant this song:
.....

Saadi Shirazi
They Shut Me Up In Prose

They shut me up in Prose --
As when a little Girl
They put me in the Closet --
Because they liked me "still" --
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
The Days Of Our Youth

These are the days of our youth, our days of glory and honour.
Pleasure begotten of strength is ours, the sword in our hand.
Wisdom bends to our will, we lead captivity captive,
Kings of our lives and love, receiving gifts from men.
.....
Wilfrid Scawen Blunt

Wilfrid Scawen Blunt
The Crusader

He is come from the land of the sword and shrine,
From the sainted battles of Palestine;
The snow plumes wave o'er his victor crest,
Like a glory, the red cross hangs at his breast;
.....

Letitia Elizabeth Landon
The Captive Dove

Poor restless dove, I pity thee;
And when I hear thy plaintive moan,
I mourn for thy captivity,
And in thy woes forget mine own.
.....

Anne Brontë
The Victories Of Love. Book I

I
From Frederick Graham

Mother, I smile at your alarms!
.....
Coventry Patmore

Coventry Patmore
The Vintage To The Dungeon. A Song

I.
Sing out, pent soules, sing cheerefully!
Care shackles you in liberty:
Mirth frees you in captivity.
.....
Richard Lovelace

Richard Lovelace
The Lark Confinèd In His Cage

The lark confinèd in his cage,
And captive in his wing,
Though fluttering with imprisoned rage,
Forbeareth not to sing.
.....

Alfred Austin
So Let Us Love

Most glorious Lord of life! that on this day
Didst make thy triumph over death and sin,
And having harrowed hell, didst bring away
Captivity thence captive, us to win:
.....
Edmund Spenser

Edmund Spenser
My White Mouse

At dusk I saw a craintive mouse
That sneaked and stole around the house;
At first I took it for a ghost,
For it was snowy white - almost.
.....

Robert William Service
The Caged Eagle-s Death Dream

from CAWDOR
While George went to the house
For his revolver, Michal climbed up the hill
Weeping; but when he came with death in his hand
.....

Robinson Jeffers
The Babylonian Captivity

By far Euphratesâ?? stream we state,
A weary band of herded slaves,
And over Judahâ??s fallen estate
We wept into the passing waves.
.....

Charles Harpur
The Easter Decorations

O take away your dried and painted garlands!
The snow-cloth's fallen from each quicken'd brow,
The stone's rolled off the sepulchre of winter,
And risen leaves and flowers are wanted now.
.....

Ada Cambridge
Songs Of Praise The Angels Sang

Songs of praise the angels sang,
Heavâ??n with alleluias rang,
When creation was begun,
When God spoke and it was done.
.....

James Montgomery
At A Vatican Exercise (excerpt)

The Latin speeches ended, the English thus began
Hail native language, that by sinews weak
Didst move my first endeavouring tongue to speak,
And mad'st imperfect words with childish trips,
.....
John Milton

John Milton
Ch 08 On Rules For Conduct In Life - Maxim 59

I had a wound under my robe and a sheikh asked me daily how, but not where it is, and I learned that he refrained because it is not admissible to mention every member; and wise men have also said that whoever does not ponder his question will be grieved by the answer.

Until thou knowest thy words to be perfectly suitable
Thou must not open thy mouth in speech.
.....

Saadi Shirazi
The Prelude - Book Ninth

RESIDENCE IN FRANCE

Even as a river, partly (it might seem)
Yielding to old remembrances, and swayed
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Prophecy Of Dante

Canto The First.

Once more in Man's frail world! which I had left
So long that 'twas forgotten; and I feel
.....

George Gordon Byron
William Tell. - A Sonnet.

Chains may subdue the feeble spirit, but thee,
Tell, of the iron heart! they could not tame!
For thou wert of the mountains; they proclaim
The everlasting creed of liberty.
.....
William Cullen Bryant

William Cullen Bryant
The Captive Dove

Poor restless dove, I pity thee;
And when I hear thy plaintive moan,
I mourn for thy captivity,
And in thy woes forget mine own.
.....

Anne Brontë
St Michael's Mount - Inscribed To The Right Honourable Lord Somers.

While summer airs scarce breathe along the tide,
Oft pausing, up the mountain's craggy side
We climb, how beautiful, how still, how clear,
The scenes that stretch around! The rocks that rear
.....

William Lisle Bowles
Psal. Lxxxv.

Thy Land to favour graciously
Thou hast not Lord been slack,
Thou hast from hard Captivity
Returned Jacob back.
.....
John Milton

John Milton
The Lawyers First Tale

Primitiæ, or Third Cousins.

I

.....
Arthur Hugh Clough

Arthur Hugh Clough
Pelayo And The Merchant's Daughter - Prose

It is the common lamentation of Spanish historiographers, that, for an obscure and melancholy space of time immediately succeeding the conquest of their country by the Moslems, its history is a mere wilderness of dubious facts, groundless fables, and rash exaggerations. Learned men, in cells and cloisters, have worn out their lives in vainly endeavoring to connect incongruous events, and to account for startling improbabilities, recorded of this period. The worthy Jesuit, Padre Abarca, declares that, for more than forty years during which he had been employed in theological controversies, he had never found any so obscure and inexplicable as those which rise out of this portion of Spanish history, and that the only fruit of an indefatigable, prolix, and even prodigious study of the subject, was a melancholy and mortifying state of indecision.1 During this apocryphal period, flourished PELAYO, the deliverer of Spain, whose name, like that of William Wallace, will ever be linked with the glory of his country, but linked, in like manner, by a bond in which fact and fiction are inextricably interwoven.

The quaint old chronicle of the Moor Rasis, which, though wild and fanciful in the extreme, is frequently drawn upon for early facts by Spanish historians, professes to give the birth, parentage, and whole course of fortune of Pelayo, without the least doubt or hesitation. It makes him a son of the Duke of Cantabria, and descended, both by father and mother's side, from the Gothic kings of Spain. I shall pass over the romantic story of his childhood, and shall content myself with a scene of his youth, which was spent in a castle among the Pyrenees, under the eye of his widowed and noble-minded mother, who caused him to be instructed in everything befitting a cavalier of gentle birth. While the sons of the nobility were revelling amid the pleasures of a licentious court, and sunk in that vicious and effeminate indulgence which led to the perdition of unhappy Spain, the youthful Pelayo, in his rugged mountain school, was steeled to all kinds of hardy exercise. A great part of his time was spent in hunting the bears, the wild boars, and the wolves, with which the Pyrenees abounded; and so purely and chastely was he brought up, by his good lady mother, that, if the ancient chronicle from which I draw my facts may be relied on, he had attained his one-and-twentieth year, without having once sighed for woman!

.....

Washington Irving
The Animals That Noah Forgot: Foreward

The big white English swan, escaped from captivity, found himself swimming in an Australian waterhole fringed with giant gum trees. In one of the lower forks of a gum tree sat a placid ound-eyed elderly gentleman apparently thinking of nothing whatever, in other words, a native bear.

"Excuse me, sir," said the swan, "can you tell me where I am?"

.....

Banjo Paterson (andrew Barton)
Mary Queen Of Scots - Landing At The Mouth Of The Derwent, Workington

Dear to the Loves, and to the Graces vowed,
The Queen drew back the wimple that she wore;
And to the throng, that on the Cumbrian shore
Her landing hailed, how touchingly she bowed!
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Captivity--mary Queen Of Scots

"As the cold aspect of a sunless way
Strikes through the Traveller's frame with deadlier chill,
Oft as appears a grove, or obvious hill,
Glistening with unparticipated ray,
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Ode - The Morning Of The Day Appointed For A General Thanksgiving. January 18, 1816

I

Hail, orient Conqueror of gloomy Night!
Thou that canst shed the bliss of gratitude
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Morning Of The Day Appointed For A General Thanksgiving. January 18, 1816

I

Hail, orient Conqueror of gloomy Night!
Thou that canst shed the bliss of gratitude
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The White Doe Of Rylstone, Or, The Fate Of The Nortons - Canto Fourth

'Tis night: in silence looking down,
The Moon, from cloudless ether, sees
A Camp, and a beleaguered Town,
And Castle, like a stately crown
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
In Dependence

We won, but never conquered
We fought, but never wrestled
We chanted victorious songs,but
We're still the captured ones
.....
Onobhamiukor God's Gift

Onobhamiukor God's Gift