Who is Count Giacomo Leopardi


Giacomo LeopardiGiacomo Taldegardo Francesco di Sales Saverio Pietro LeopardiBorn(1798-06-29)29 June 1798
Recanati, Papal StatesDied
Read Full Biography


Count Giacomo Leopardi Poems

  • On An Old Sepuchral Bas-relief
    WHERE IS SEEN A YOUNG MAIDEN, DEAD, IN THE ACT OF DEPARTING,
    TAKING LEAVE OF HER FAMILY.

    ...
  • The Evening Of The Holiday
    The night is mild and clear, and without wind,
    And o'er the roofs, and o'er the gardens round
    The moon shines soft, and from afar reveals
    Each mountain-peak serene. O lady, mine, ...
  • On The Portrait Of A Beautiful Woman,
    CARVED ON HER MONUMENT.


    Such _wast_ thou: now in earth below, ...
  • The Last Song Of Sappho
    Thou tranquil night, and thou, O gentle ray
    Of the declining moon; and thou, that o'er
    The rock appearest, 'mid the silent grove,
    The messenger of day; how dear ye were, ...
  • Palinodia
    TO THE MARQUIS GINO CAPPONI.


    I was mistaken, my dear Gino. Long ...
Read All Poems


Top 10 most used topics by Count Giacomo Leopardi

Life 33 Heaven 30 Earth 28 Heart 27 Love 26 Hope 26 I Love You 26 Light 25 Fate 24 World 24


Count Giacomo Leopardi Quotes

Read All Quotes


Comments about Count Giacomo Leopardi

  • Sun__series: the village saturday night poem by count giacomo leopardi
  • Ozannemichael: giacomo leopardi ("i heard he was a count"... "i thought he was alright...")
  • Hbryant: on the notebooks of count giacomo leopardi - los angeles review of books: on the notebooks of count giacomo leopardi
  • Doinabadescu: impromptu: two poems by count giacomo leopardi - tr...
  • Bookappreciator: "about this time an action was being instituted against humanity by a young italian, the count giacomo leopardi, and the muffled discontent which for centuries had been throbbing through land and literature was raised by his verse into one clear note of eloquent arraignment."
Read All Comments

Write your comment about Count Giacomo Leopardi


Poem of the day

John Milton Poem
Lycidas
 by John Milton

In this Monody the author bewails a learned Friend, unfortunately
drowned in his passage from Chester on the Irish Seas, 1637;
and, by occasion, foretells the ruin of our corrupted Clergy,
then in their height.


Yet once more, O ye laurels, and once more,
Ye myrtles brown, with ivy never sere,
...

Read complete poem

Popular Poets