OBSCURITY POEMS

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How Beautiful The Queen Of Night

How beautiful the Queen of Night, on high
Her way pursuing among scattered clouds,
Where, ever and anon, her head she shrouds
Hidden from view in dense obscurity.
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Venus And Adonis

Even as the sun with purple-coloured face
Had ta'en his last leave of the weeping morn,
Rose-cheeked Adonis hied him to the chase;
Hunting he loved, but love he laughed to scorn.
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
A Hymn

AFTER READING 'LEAD, KINDLY LIGHT.'

Lead gently, Lord, and slow,
For oh, my steps are weak,
.....
Paul Laurence Dunbar

Paul Laurence Dunbar
A Complaint

There is a change-and I am poor;
Your love hath been, nor long ago,
A fountain at my fond heart's door,
Whose only business was to flow;
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Character Of The Happy Warrior

Who is the happy Warrior? Who is he
That every man in arms should wish to be?
-It is the generous Spirit, who, when brought
Among the tasks of real life, hath wrought
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Privacy

Oh you who are shy of the popular eye,
(Though most of us seek to survive it)
Just think of the goldfish who wanted to die
Because she could never be private.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
Blue

The earth again like a ship steams out of the dark sea over
The edge of the blue, and the sun stands up to see us glide
Slowly into another day; slowly the rover
Vessel of darkness takes the rising tide.
.....
D. H. Lawrence

D. H. Lawrence
Alma Mater

He knocked, and I beheld him at the door-
A vision for the gods to verify.
“What battered ancientry is this,” thought I,
“And when, if ever, did we meet before?”
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Merlin I

“Gawaine, Gawaine, what look ye for to see,
So far beyond the faint edge of the world?
D'ye look to see the lady Vivian,
Pursued by divers ominous vile demons
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Merlin Iv

The tortured King-seeing Merlin wholly meshed
In his defection, even to indifference,
And all the while attended and exalted
By some unfathomable obscurity
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Old Trails

(Washington Square)

I met him, as one meets a ghost or two,
Between the gray Arch and the old Hotel.
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
The Poet

â??A Rhapsody


Of all the various lots around the ball,
.....
Mark Akenside

Mark Akenside
English Bards And Scotch Reviewers (excerpt)

Time was, ere yet in these degenerate days
Ignoble themes obtain'd mistaken praise,
When sense and wit with poesy allied,
No fabl'd graces, flourish'd side by side;
.....

George Gordon Byron
Tennyson

The noble lion groweth old,
The weight of years his eyesight dims,
And strength deserts his mighty limbs,
His once warm blood runs slow and cold.
.....

Arthur Weir
Impromptu

Tell me your race, your name,
O Lady limned as dead, yet as when living fair!
That within this faded frame
An unfading beauty wear.
.....

Alfred Austin
An Invite, To Eternity

Wilt thou go with me, sweet maid,
Say, maiden, wilt thou go with me
Through the valley-depths of shade,
Of night and dark obscurity;
.....
John Clare

John Clare
An Evening Walk, Addressed To A Young Lady

The young Lady to whom this was addressed was my Sister. It was
composed at school, and during my two first College vacations.
There is not an image in it which I have not observed; and now, in
my seventy-third year, I recollect the time and place where most
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Vanishings

As one whose eyes have watched the stricken day
Swoon to its crimson death adown the sea,
Turning his face to eastward suddenly
Sees a lack-lustre world all chill and gray,-
.....

William Watson
Midnight

'Tis midnight o'er the dim mere's lonely bosom,
Dark, dusky, windy midnight: swift are driven
The swelling vapours onward: every blossom
Bathes its bright petals in the tears of heaven.
.....
Alfred Lord Tennyson

Alfred Lord Tennyson
The Virtuous Man

Thus fears the man whom virtue, beacon-like,
Hath fix'd upon the hills of eminence;
At him the tempests of mad envy strike,
And rage against his piles of innocence;
.....
George Wither

George Wither
The School-mistress. In Imitation Of Spenser (excerpt)

Auditæ voces, vagitus et ingens,Infantunque animæ flentes in limine primo. Virg.ADVERTISEMENT
What particulars in Spenser were imagined most proper for the author's imitationon this occasion, are his language, his simplicity, his manner of description,and a peculiar tenderness of sentiment remarkable throughout his works.
Ah me! full sorely is my heart forlorn,
To think how modest worth neglected lies;
.....

William Shenstone
A Summer Night

In the deserted, moon-blanched street,
How lonely rings the echo of my feet!
Those windows, which I gaze at, frown,
Silent and white, unopening down,
.....
Matthew Arnold

Matthew Arnold
La Chevelure (her Hair)

Ã? toison, moutonnant jusque sur l'encolure!
� boucles! � parfum chargé de nonchaloir!
Extase! Pour peupler ce soir l'alcôve obscure
Des souvenirs dormant dans cette chevelure,
.....
Charles Baudelaire

Charles Baudelaire
A Lover's Call Xxvii

Where are you, my beloved? Are you in that little
Paradise, watering the flowers who look upon you
As infants look upon the breast of their mothers?

.....

Khalil Gibran
It Is Not Seemly To Be Famous...

It is not seemly to be famous:
Celebrity does not exalt;
There is no need to hoard your writings
And to preserve them in a vault.
.....
Boris Pasternak

Boris Pasternak
Friendship

What virtue, or what mental grace
But men unqualified and base
Will boast it their possession?
Profusion apes the noble part
.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
The Comfort Of Obscurity

INSPIRED BY READING MR. KIPLING'S POEMS AS
PRINTED IN THE NEW YORK PAPERS

Though earnest and industrious,
.....

Franklin Pierce Adams
Privacy

Oh you who are shy of the popular eye,
(Though most of us seek to survive it)
Just think of the goldfish who wanted to die
Because she could never be private.
.....

Robert William Service
Invitation To Eternity

Say, wilt thou go with me, sweet maid,
Say, maiden, wilt thou go with me
Through the valley-depths of shade,
Of bright and dark obscurity;
.....
John Clare

John Clare
Orpheus

Orpheus he went, as poets tell,
To fetch Eurydice from hell;
And had her, but it was upon
This short, but strict condition;
.....

Robert Herrick
The Faithful Friend

O, FRIEND! whose heart the grave doth shroud from human joy or woe,
Know'st thou who wanders by thy tomb, with footsteps sad and slow?
Know'st thou whose brow is dark with grief? whose eyes are dim with tears?
Whose restless soul is sinking with its agony of fears?
.....
Caroline Elizabeth Sarah Norton

Caroline Elizabeth Sarah Norton
In The British Museum

Shafts of light, that poured from the August sun,
Glowed on long red walls of the gallery cool;
Fell upon monstrous visions of ages gone,
Still, smiling Sphinx, winged and bearded Bull.
.....

Robert Laurence Binyon
There Is A Pleasure In Poetic Pains

'There is a pleasure in poetic pains
Which only Poets know'; 'twas rightly said;
Whom could the Muses else allure to tread
Their smoothest paths, to wear their lightest chains?
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Translation Of: The Odyssey Of Homer: Book Iii

ARGUMENT

Telemachus arriving at Pylus, enquires of Nestor concerning Ulysses. Nestor relates to him all that he knows or has heard of the Greecians since their departure from the siege of Troy, but not being able to give him any satisfactory account of Ulysses, refers him to Menelaus. At evening Minerva quits Telemachus, but discovers herself in going. Nestor sacrifices to the Goddess, and the solemnity ended, Telemachus sets forth for Sparta in one of Nestor's chariots, and accompanied by Nestor's son, Pisistratus.

.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
Why Art Thou Silent And Invisible

Why art thou silent and invisible
Father of jealousy
Why dost thou hide thyself in clouds
From every searching Eye
.....
William Blake

William Blake
A Phantom

I. The Blackness

In vaults of fathomless obscurity
Where Destiny has sentenced me for life;
.....
Charles Baudelaire

Charles Baudelaire
The Double Chamber

A chamber that is like a reverie; a chamber truly spiritual, where the stagnant atmosphere is lightly touched with rose and blue.
There the soul bathes itself in indolence made odorous with regret and desire. There is some sense of the twilight, of things tinged with blue and rose: a dream of delight during an eclipse. The shape of the furniture is elongated, low, languishing; one would think it endowed with the somnambulistic vitality of plants and minerals.
The tapestries speak an inarticulate language, like the flowers, the skies, the dropping suns.
There are no artistic abominations upon the walls.
.....
Charles Baudelaire

Charles Baudelaire
The Wretched Monk

Old monasteries under steadfast walls
Displayed tableaux of holy Verity,
Warming the inner men in those cold halls
Against the chill of their austerity.
.....
Charles Baudelaire

Charles Baudelaire
The Lawyer's Second Tale

Christian.


A highland inn among the western hills,
.....
Arthur Hugh Clough

Arthur Hugh Clough
The Book And The Ring

Here were the end, had anything an end:
Thus, lit and launched, up and up roared and soared
A rocket, till the key o' the vault was reached,
And wide heaven held, a breathless minute-space,
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
The Inn Kitchen - Prose

Shall I not take mine ease in mine inn?
- FALSTAFF.


.....

Washington Irving
Desultory Thoughts On Criticism - Prose

"Let a man write never so well, there are now-a-days a sort of persons they call critics, that, egad, have no more wit in them than so many hobby-horses: but they'll laugh at you, Sir, and find fault, and censure things, that, egad, I'm sure they are not able to do themselves; a sort of envious persons, that emulate the glories of persons of parts, and think to build their fame by calumniation of persons that, egad, to my knowledge, of all persons in the world, are in nature the persons that do as much despise all that, as, a, In fine, I'll say no more of 'em!" REHEARSAL.

All the world knows the story of the tempest-tossed voyager, who, coming upon a strange coast, and seeing a man hanging in chains, hailed it with joy, as the sign of a civilized country. In like manner we may hail, as a proof of the rapid advancement of civilization and refinement in this country, the increasing number of delinquent authors daily gibbeted for the edification of the public.

.....

Washington Irving
The Mutability Of Literature - A Colloquy In Westminster Abbey - Prose

I know that all beneath the moon decays,
And what by mortals in this world is brought,
In time's great periods shall return to nought.
I know that all the muses' heavenly rays,
.....

Washington Irving
Divine, O Ganga

The holy and sacred river of India,
Starts its coarse and lumpy journey from the all mighty and staunchest Himalayas.

Its creation and origin from the head of Lord Shiva,
.....
Anuradha Mukherjee

Anuradha Mukherjee
Koya San

High on the mountain, shrouded in vast trees,
The stillness had the chastity of frost.
I trod the fallen pallors of the moon.
The path was paven stone: I was not lost,
.....

Robert Laurence Binyon
The Death Of Adam

Cedars, that high upon the untrodden slopes
Of Lebanon stretch out their stubborn arms,
Through all the tempests of seven hundred years
Fast in their ancient place, where they look down
.....

Robert Laurence Binyon
The Idols

An Ode
Luce intellettual, piena d' amore


.....

Robert Laurence Binyon
An Evening

Addressed To A Young Lady

Far from my dearest Friend, 'tis mine to rove
Through bare grey dell, high wood, and pastoral cove;
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Prelude - Book Eighth

RETROSPECT LOVE OF NATURE LEADING TO LOVE OF MAN

What sounds are those, Helvellyn, that are heard
Up to thy summit, through the depth of air
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Secret

I
I lay upon my bed in the great night:
The sense of my body drowsed;
But a clearness yet lingered in the spirit,
.....

Robert Laurence Binyon