SLOGAN POEMS

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The Trail Of Ninety-eight

Gold! We leapt from our benches. Gold! We sprang from our stools.
Gold! We wheeled in the furrow, fired with the faith of fools.
Fearless, unfound, unfitted, far from the night and the cold,
Heard we the clarion summons, followed the master-lure-Gold!
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
An Appeal To End Appeals

Sir, - I try to do my duty as a patriotic man
With sane views about the science of gastronomy;
And I'd ask the promulgators of each food consuming plan
To consider man's interior economy.
.....

Clarence Michael James Stanislaus Dennis
Carry On

They spoke it bravely, grimly, in their darkest hours of doubt;
They spoke it when their hope was low and when their strength gave out;
We heard it from the dying in those troubled days now gone,
And they breathed it as their slogan for the living: 'Carry on!'
.....
Edgar Albert Guest

Edgar Albert Guest
Prairie

I WAS born on the prairie and the milk of its wheat, the red of its clover, the eyes of its women, gave me a song and a
slogan.

Here the water went down, the icebergs slid with gravel, the gaps and the valleys hissed, and the black loam came, and the
.....
Carl Sandburg

Carl Sandburg
The Widow Of Glencoe

Do not lift him from the bracken,
Leave him lying where he fell-
Better bier ye cannot fashion:
None beseems him half so well
.....

William Edmondstoune Aytoun
Kinmont Willie

(Child, vol. vi.)


O have ye na heard o the fause Sakelde?
.....
Andrew Lang

Andrew Lang
Broken Heart

Alone

You promised to always be there,
But you are not even here.
.....

Kelly Of The Legion

Now Kelly was no fighter;
He loved his pipe and glass;
An easygoing blighter,
Who lived in Montparnasse.
.....

Robert William Service
The Battler

'Could you give me a bite to eat?' said he,
As he tarried by my back door.
And I thought of the dull, lean days that be
As I glanced at the clothes he wore:
.....

Clarence Michael James Stanislaus Dennis
The Lay Of The Last Minstrel: Canto I

Introduction.

The way was long, the wind was cold,
The Minstrel was infirm and old;
.....
Sir Walter Scott

Sir Walter Scott
Camp Followers

In the old wars of the world there were camp-followers,
Women of ancient sins who gave themselves for hire,
Women of weak wills and strong desire.
And, like the poison ivy in the woods
.....
Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
Loud And Low In The Chimney

LOUD and low in the chimney
The squalls suspire;
Then like an answer dwindles
And glows the fire,
.....
Robert Louis Stevenson

Robert Louis Stevenson
Wall, Cave, And Pillar Statements, After Asoka

In order to perfect all readers
the statements should he carved
on rock walls, on cave walls,
and on the sides of pillars so
.....

Alan Dugan
They Shall Not Win

Whatever the strength of our foes is now,
Whatever it may have been,
This is our slogan, and this our vow-
They shall not win, they shall not win.
.....
Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
Our New Horse

The boys had come back from the races
All silent and down on their luck;
They'd backed 'em, straight out and for places,
But never a winner they's struck.
.....

Banjo Paterson (andrew Barton)
The World's Convention Of The Friends Of Emancipation, Held In London In 1840

Yes, let them gather! Summon forth
The pledged philanthropy of Earth.
From every land, whose hills have heard
The bugle blast of Freedom waking;
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
Marmion: Canto Vi. - The Battle

I.

While great events were on the gale,
And each hour brought a varying tale,
.....

Walter Scott (sir)
Marmion: Canto V. - The Court

I.

The train has left the hills of Braid;
The barrier guard have open made
.....

Walter Scott (sir)
The Bridal Of Triermain

Introduction.

I.
Come Lucy! while 'tis morning hour
.....

Walter Scott (sir)
The Lady Of The Lake: Canto Ii. - The Island

I.
At morn the black-cock trims his jetty wing,
'T is morning prompts the linnet's blithest lay,
All Nature's children feel the matin spring
.....

Walter Scott (sir)
The Lay Of The Last Minstrel: Canto I

Introduction.

The way was long, the wind was cold,
The Minstrel was infirm and old;
.....

Walter Scott (sir)
The Bridal Of Triermain

Introduction.
I.
Come Lucy! while 'tis morning hour
The woodland brook we needs must pass;
.....
Sir Walter Scott

Sir Walter Scott
My Slogan Is Revolution

My Slogan is Revolution
The truth can never remain concealed
Can one stop rising sun
How long must we keep pleading
.....
Majid Mahi

Majid Mahi
The Burial March Of Dundee

Sound the fife, and cry the slogan-
Let the pibroch shake the air
With its wild triumphal music,
Worthy of the freight we bear.
.....

William Edmondstoune Aytoun
The Lay Of The Last Minstrel: Canto Iv

I
Sweet Teviot! on thy silver tide
The glaring bale-fires blaze no more;
No longer steel-clad warrior ride
.....

Walter Scott (sir)
Kelly Of The Legion

Now Kelly was no fighter;
He loved his pipe and glass;
An easygoing blighter,
Who lived in Montparnasse.
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
The Ballad Of How Macpherson Held The Floor

Said President MacConnachie to Treasurer MacCall:
“We ought to have a piper for our next Saint Andrew's Ball.
Yon squakin' saxophone gives me the syncopated gripes.
I'm sick of jazz, I want to hear the skirling of the pipes.”
.....
Robert Service

Robert Service
Dark Rosaleen

O my Dark Rosaleen,
Do not sigh, do not weep!
The priests are on the ocean green,
They march along the deep.
.....
James Clarence Mangan

James Clarence Mangan
The Joys Of The Road

Now the joys of the road are chiefly these:
A crimson touch on the hard-wood trees;

A vagrant's morning wide and blue,
.....
Bliss Carman And Richard Hovey

Bliss Carman And Richard Hovey
Our New Horse

The boys had come back from the races
All silent and down on their luck;
They'd backed 'em, straight out and for places,
But never a winner they's struck.
.....

Banjo Paterson
Marmion: Canto V. - The Court

I.

The train has left the hills of Braid;
The barrier guard have open made
.....
Sir Walter Scott

Sir Walter Scott
Charles Edward At Versailles

ON THE ANNIVERSARY OF CULLODEN


Take away that star and garter-
.....

William Edmondstoune Aytoun
The Ballad Of How Macpherson Held The Floor

Said President MacConnachie to Treasurer MacCall:
"We ought to have a piper for our next Saint Andrew's Ball.
Yon squakin' saxophone gives me the syncopated gripes.
I'm sick of jazz, I want to hear the skirling of the pipes."
.....

Robert William Service
The Battle Of Flodden Field

'Twas on the 9th of September, a very beautiful day,
That a numerous English army came in grand array,
And pitched their tents on Flodden field so green
In the year of our Lord fifteen hundred and thirteen.
.....

William Topaz Mcgonagall
A Song Of Rain

Because a little vagrant wind veered south from China Sea;
Or else, because a sun-spot stirred; and yet again, maybe
Because some idle god in play breathed on an errant cloud,
The heads of twice two million folk in gratitude are bowed.
.....

Clarence Michael James Stanislaus Dennis
The Trail Of Ninety-eight

Gold! We leapt from our benches. Gold! We sprang from our stools.
Gold! We wheeled in the furrow, fired with the faith of fools.
Fearless, unfound, unfitted, far from the night and the cold,
Heard we the clarion summons, followed the master-lure--Gold!
.....

Robert William Service
The Execution Of Montrose

COME hither, Evan Cameron!
Come, stand beside my knee:
I hear the river roaring down
Towards the wintry sea.
.....

William Edmondstoune Aytoun
Corona 2020

Lockdown is set 
Roads are deserted

No one is out 
.....
Rayaba Saindane

Rayaba Saindane
Cremona

[The French Army, including a part of the Irish Brigade, under Marshal Villeroy, held the fortified town of Cremona during the winter of 1702. Prince Eugene, with the Imperial Army, surprised it one morning, and, owing to the treachery of a priest, occupied the whole city before the alarm was given. Villeroy was captured, together with many of the French garrison. The Irish, however, consisting of the regiments of Dillon and of Burke, held a fort commanding the river gate, and defended themselves all day, in spite of Prince Eugene's efforts to win them over to his cause. Eventually Eugene, being unable to take the post, was compelled to withdraw from the city.]

The Grenadiers of Austria are proper men and tall;
The Grenadiers of Austria have scaled the city wall;
.....

Arthur Conan Doyle
America

I am the refuge of all the oppressed,
I am the boast of the free,
I am the harbour where ships may rest
Safely 'twixt sea and sea.
.....
Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
Montcalm

"Ce n'est rien, ce n'est rien; ne vous affligez pas pour moi, mes bonnes amies."

Montcalm, calm mount, thou didst not faint nor fail
At that fierce volley from thy foemen near,
.....

W. M. Mackeracher
The Joys Of The Road

Now the joys of the road are chiefly these:
A crimson touch on the hard-wood trees;

A vagrant's morning wide and blue,
.....

Bliss Carman (william)
Kinmont Willie

The Text.--There is only one text of this ballad, and that was printed by Scott in the Minstrelsy from 'tradition in the West Borders'; he adds that 'some conjectural emendations have been absolutely necessary,' a remark suspicious in itself; and such modernities as the double rhymes in 26.3, 28.3, etc., do not restore confidence.


The Story.--The forcible entry into Carlisle Castle and the rescue of William Armstrong, called Will of Kinmouth, took place on April 13, 1596; but Kinmont Willie was notorious as a border thief at least as early as 1584.
.....

Frank Sidgwick
Fate

FATE

See this wonder that enclaves our heart,
The song we sang as the Israelites in need of king.
.....
Olorunleke Olorode

Olorunleke Olorode
Dictator’s Doeks

**

DICTATOR’S DOEKS

.....
Mbizo Chirasha

Mbizo Chirasha