CHRONICLE POEMS

This page is specially prepared for chronicle poems. You can reach newest and popular chronicle poems from this page. You can vote and comment on the chronicle poems you read.

The Sonnets Cvi - When In The Chronicle Of Wasted Time

When in the chronicle of wasted time
I see descriptions of the fairest wights,
And beauty making beautiful old rime,
In praise of ladies dead and lovely knights,
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
The Victory

Hark-how the church-bells thundering harmony
Stuns the glad ear! tidings of joy have come,
Good tidings of great joy! two gallant ships
Met on the element,-they met, they fought
.....
Robert Southey

Robert Southey
To Mrs. Unwin

Mary! I want a lyre with other strings,
Such aid from heaven as some have feigned they drew.
An eloquence scarce given to mortals, new
And undebased by praise of meaner things,
.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
Captain Craig

I

I doubt if ten men in all Tilbury Town
Had ever shaken hands with Captain Craig,
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Sonnet 106: When In The Chronicle Of Wasted Time

When in the chronicle of wasted time
I see descriptions of the fairest wights,
And beauty making beautiful old rhyme
In praise of ladies dead, and lovely knights,
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
Modernities

Small knowledge have we that by knowledge met
May not some day be quaint as any told
In almagest or chronicle of old,
Whereat we smile because we are as yet
.....
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Cadet Grey: Canto Ii

I

Where West Point crouches, and with lifted shield
Turns the whole river eastward through the pass;
.....
Bret Harte

Bret Harte
Time, A Poem

Genius of musings, who, the midnight hour
Wasting in woods or haunted forests wild,
Dost watch Orion in his arctic tower,
Thy dark eye fix'd as in some holy trance;
.....

Henry Kirk White
Vanitas Vanitatum

How spake of old the Royal Seer?
(His text is one I love to treat on.)
This life of ours he said is sheer
Mataiotes Mataioteton.
.....
William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray
Aylmer's Field

Dust are our frames; and gilded dust, our pride
Looks only for a moment whole and sound;
Like that long-buried body of the king,
Found lying with his urns and ornaments,
.....
Alfred Lord Tennyson

Alfred Lord Tennyson
Childhood

I cannot reach it; and my striving eye
Dazzles at it, as at eternity.
Were now that chronicle alive,
Those white designs which children drive,
.....

Henry Vaughan
Don Juan: Canto The Sixteenth

The antique Persians taught three useful things,
To draw the bow, to ride, and speak the truth.
This was the mode of Cyrus, best of kings--
A mode adopted since by modern youth.
.....

George Gordon Byron
On Cutting Down The Thorn At Market-hill

At Market-Hill, as well appears
By chronicle of ancient date,
There stood for many hundred years
A spacious thorn before the gate.
.....
Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift
The Princes' Quest - Part The Seventh

But Sleep, who makes a mist about the sense,
Doth ope the eyelids of the soul, and thence
Lifteth a heavier cloud than that whereby
He veils the vision of the fleshly eye.
.....

William Watson
Sonnet Cvi

When in the chronicle of wasted time
I see descriptions of the fairest wights,
And beauty making beautiful old rhyme
In praise of ladies dead and lovely knights,
.....
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
A True Hero

JAMES BRAIDWOOD: Died June 22, 1861.

NOT at the battle front,--writ of in story;
Not on the blazing wreck steering to glory;
.....

Dinah Maria Mulock Craik
The Bridal Of Pennacook

We had been wandering for many days
Through the rough northern country. We had seen
The sunset, with its bars of purple cloud,
Like a new heaven, shine upward from the lake
.....
John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
Pelayo And The Merchant's Daughter - Prose

It is the common lamentation of Spanish historiographers, that, for an obscure and melancholy space of time immediately succeeding the conquest of their country by the Moslems, its history is a mere wilderness of dubious facts, groundless fables, and rash exaggerations. Learned men, in cells and cloisters, have worn out their lives in vainly endeavoring to connect incongruous events, and to account for startling improbabilities, recorded of this period. The worthy Jesuit, Padre Abarca, declares that, for more than forty years during which he had been employed in theological controversies, he had never found any so obscure and inexplicable as those which rise out of this portion of Spanish history, and that the only fruit of an indefatigable, prolix, and even prodigious study of the subject, was a melancholy and mortifying state of indecision.1 During this apocryphal period, flourished PELAYO, the deliverer of Spain, whose name, like that of William Wallace, will ever be linked with the glory of his country, but linked, in like manner, by a bond in which fact and fiction are inextricably interwoven.

The quaint old chronicle of the Moor Rasis, which, though wild and fanciful in the extreme, is frequently drawn upon for early facts by Spanish historians, professes to give the birth, parentage, and whole course of fortune of Pelayo, without the least doubt or hesitation. It makes him a son of the Duke of Cantabria, and descended, both by father and mother's side, from the Gothic kings of Spain. I shall pass over the romantic story of his childhood, and shall content myself with a scene of his youth, which was spent in a castle among the Pyrenees, under the eye of his widowed and noble-minded mother, who caused him to be instructed in everything befitting a cavalier of gentle birth. While the sons of the nobility were revelling amid the pleasures of a licentious court, and sunk in that vicious and effeminate indulgence which led to the perdition of unhappy Spain, the youthful Pelayo, in his rugged mountain school, was steeled to all kinds of hardy exercise. A great part of his time was spent in hunting the bears, the wild boars, and the wolves, with which the Pyrenees abounded; and so purely and chastely was he brought up, by his good lady mother, that, if the ancient chronicle from which I draw my facts may be relied on, he had attained his one-and-twentieth year, without having once sighed for woman!

.....

Washington Irving
To Mrs. Unwin.

Mary! I want a lyre with other strings,
Such aid from heaven as some have feign'd they drew,
An eloquence scarce given to mortals, new
And undebased by praise of meaner things,
.....
William Cowper

William Cowper
The Battle Of Otterburn

THE FIRST FYTTE


It fell about the Lammas tide,
.....

George Wharton Edwards
The Miracle Of Padre Junipero

This is the tale that the Chronicle
Tells of the wonderful miracle
Wrought by the pious Padre Serro,
The very reverend Junipero.
.....

Bret Harte (francis)
Paracelsus: Part Iii: Paracelsus

Scene. Basil; a chamber in the house of Paracelsus. 1526.
Paracelsus, Festus.


.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Paracelsus: Part Ii: Paracelsus Attains

Scene. Constantinople; the house of a Greek Conjurer. 1521.
Paracelsus.


.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
A Death In The Desert

[Supposed of Pamphylax the Antiochene:
It is a parchment, of my rolls the fifth,
Hath three skins glued together, is all Greek,
And goeth from Epsilon down to Mu:
.....
Robert Browning

Robert Browning
Christmas Eve - Prose

Saint Francis and Saint Benedight
Blesse this house from wicked wight;
From the night-mare and the goblin,
That is hight good fellow Robin;
.....

Washington Irving
The Excursion - Book First - The Wanderer

'Twas summer, and the sun had mounted high:
Southward the landscape indistinctly glared
Through a pale steam; but all the northern downs,
In clearest air ascending, showed far off
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Memorials Of A Tour In Scotland, 1803 Ix. Address To Kilchurn Castle, Upon Loch Awe

Child of loud-throated War! the mountain Stream
Roars in thy hearing; but thy hour of rest
Is come, and thou art silent in thy age;
Save when the wind sweeps by and sounds are caught
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Prelude - Book Ninth

RESIDENCE IN FRANCE

Even as a river, partly (it might seem)
Yielding to old remembrances, and swayed
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Prelude - Book Eighth

RETROSPECT LOVE OF NATURE LEADING TO LOVE OF MAN

What sounds are those, Helvellyn, that are heard
Up to thy summit, through the depth of air
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
In Imitation Of Dr. Swift : The Happy Life Of A Country Parson

Parson, these things in thy possessing
Are better than the Bishop's blessing.
A Wife that makes conserves; a Steed
That carries double when there's need:
.....
Alexander Pope

Alexander Pope
Dead Cities

Out of it all but this remains:
I was with one who crossed wide chains
Of the Cordilleras, whose peaks
Lock in the wilds of Yucatan,
.....
Madison Julius Cawein

Madison Julius Cawein
History

Time has stored all, but keeps his chronicle
In secret, beyond all our probe or gauge.
There flows the human story, vast and full;
And here a muddy trickle smears the page.
.....

Robert Laurence Binyon
The Oldest Inhabitant

'AND when came I to this town?' did he say!
A question asked for the asking's sake,
Answered merely an answer to make,
As stranger to stranger may;
.....

Augusta Davies Webster
Book Ninth [residence In France]

EVEN as a river,--partly (it might seem)
Yielding to old remembrances, and swayed
In part by fear to shape a way direct,
That would engulph him soon in the ravenous sea--
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Inner Conflict

THRICE 'Iö Pæan!' let me cry,
And bless the hour that I was born
And born thro' love in vain to sighâ??
To cheer my longing heart a morn
.....

Joseph Skipsey
Address To Kilchurn Castle, Upon Loch Awe

CHILD of loud-throated War! the mountain Stream
Roars in thy hearing; but thy hour of rest
Is come, and thou art silent in thy age;
Save when the wind sweeps by and sounds are caught
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Twilight

By Wâ??llâ??m Câ??wpâ??r.
'Tis evening. See with its resorting throng
Rude Carfax teems, and waistcoats, visited
With too-familiar elbow, swell the curse
.....

Sir Arthur Quiller-couch
A Poet's Home

HERE in this lonely rill-engirdled spot,
The world forgetting, by the world forgot,
With one vowed to me with beloved lips
How sweet to draw, as hiddenly from time,
.....

Charles Harpur
Elegiac Stanzas Suggested By A Picture Of Peele Castle

. I was thy neighbour once, thou rugged Pile!
Four summer weeks I dwelt in sight of thee:
I saw thee every day; and all the while
Thy Form was sleeping on a glassy sea.
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
Songs For The Soldiers

IF songs be sung let minstrels strike their harps
To large and joyous strains, all thunder-winged
To beat along vast shores. Ay, let their notes
Wild into eagles soaring toward the sun,
.....
Isabella Valancy Crawford

Isabella Valancy Crawford
The Miracle Of Padre Junipero

This is the tale that the Chronicle
Tells of the wonderful miracle
Wrought by the pious Padre Serro,
The very reverend Junipero.
.....
Bret Harte

Bret Harte
Lines To R. L.

That which we are and shall be is made up
Of what we have been. On the autumn leaf
The crimson stains bear witness of its spring;
And, on its perfect nodes, the ocean shell
.....

Henry Timrod
The Challenge. (birds Of Passage. Flight The Third)

I have a vague remembrance
Of a story, that is told
In some ancient Spanish legend
Or chronicle of old.
.....
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Brothers

'These Tourists, heaven preserve us! needs must live
A profitable life: some glance along,
Rapid and gay, as if the earth were air,
And they were butterflies to wheel about
.....
William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth
The Chronicle Of The Drum

Part I.

At Paris, hard by the Maine barriers,
Whoever will choose to repair,
.....
William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray
Jefferson's Daughter

'It is asserted, on the authority of an American Newspaper, that the
daughter of Thomas Jefferson, late President of the United States, was
sold at New Orleans for $1,000.'-Morning Chronicle.

.....

Anonymous Americas
The Dying Of Pere Pierre

“. . . with two other priests; the same night he died,
and was buried by the shores of the lake that bears his name.”
Chronicle.

.....
John Mccrae

John Mccrae
The Robin For The Crumb

864

The Robin for the Crumb
Returns no syllable
.....
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Doom And She

I

   There dwells a mighty pair -
   Slow, statuesque, intense -
.....
Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy