Comments about John Masefield

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RuthArnold: John Masefield said a university “will welcome thinkers in distress or in exile, will uphold ever the dignity of thought and learning, and will exact standards in these things.” Some thinkers in exile escaped the Holocaust. We should not now have to listen to it being denied.

amandaonwriting: Quotable -John Masefield, born 1 June 1878, died 12 May 1967. Read more here:

YonkersHistoric: 5/12/1967: English Poet Laureate John Masefield died; he worked as a threader at the Alexander Smith Carpet Mills. http://t.co/6AfPnLEv4h

MacCocktail: "In this life he laughs longest who laughs last." ― John Masefield (died this day, May 12, 1967) http://t.co/7979dTCdBQ

YonkersHistoric: 5/12/1967: Poet Laureate of England John Masefield died; he worked as a threader at the Smith Carpet Mills. http://t.co/FtBqiYw76R

wantagelitfest: "I must down to the seas again" begins Sea Fever by John Masefield who passed away in Boars Hill today in 1967. A merchant sailor he jumped ship in NYC in 1985 returning to London. Appointed poet Laureate in 1930 he held the position till his death.

LilacSundayBlog: I must down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life, To the gull’s way and the whale’s way where the wind’s like a whetted knife... From Sea Fever by John Masefield

retroculturati: Sarah Ogilvie's beautiful illustrations for The Midnight Folk by John Masefield

LTKelly84: Beautiful. John Masefield was born in Ledbury only a few miles from here, so I think of this poem whenever walking in the bluebell wood on Raggedstone Hill and wonder if it was his inspiration

FernandDouin: 'In all the mile of marvel'... John Masefield is such an under-rated poet.

lifeinleaves: Reading Angela Carter’s biography and it turns out she’s another great twentieth century writer for the list of people influenced by John Masefield’s The Box of Delights.

bigfinish: John Masefield's magical tale comes to life in June!

WilliamsonArt_: Day 335 IMAGE A DAY of Birkenhead Priory. The stunning Gull’s Window in the ‘Conway Room’ by David Hillhouse. Inspired by the poem, ‘Conway Gulls’ by John Masefield, a former ‘Conway Boy’ & Poet Laureate from 1930 - 1967. Since 1996, home to the ‘Friends of HMS Conway’. Photo SH.

lee_trepanier: Please see "Turning From the Shadows: John Masefield’s Everlasting Mercy" in VoegelinView!

bluebox99: A wind's  in the heart of me, a fire's in my heels, I am tired of brick and stone and rumbling wagon-wheels; I hunger for the sea's edge, the limit of the land, Where the wild old Atlantic is shouting on the sand. Extract from ‘A Wanderer’s Song’ by John Masefield

duncanbHR: Tough times despite slow opening up of things. Here is a great poem on hope, John Masefield's Epilogue 'I have seen flowers come in stony places And kind things done by men with ugly faces, And the gold cup won by the worst horse at the races, So I trust, too.'

susioc: “The hours that make us happy make us wise” ~ John Masefield

SusanBoylesCat: I must down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life To the gull's way and the whale's way where the wind's like a whetted knife And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick's over Sea Fever John Masefield

equityin: The hours that make us happy make us wise. ~ John Masefield

vishalnewsman: "The hours that make us happy make us wise." John Masefield

Zen_Moments: The hours that make us happy make us wise. ~ John Masefield

BarnabyEdwards: Here's my big lockdown project. A full-cast 5-hour adaptation of John Masefield's magical story, starring Derek Jacobi, Mark Gatiss, David Warner, Louise Jameson, Annette Badland, Mina Anwar, Tim Bentinck, Lisa Bowerman, Raj Ghatak and a host of other wonderful actors.

bluebox99: I must down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky, And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by; And the wheel’s kick and the wind’s song and the white sail’s shaking… An extract from Sea Fever by John Masefield

212AutoNews: “I must go down to the sea again, for the call of the running tide, is a wild call and a clear call, that cannot be denied!” ― John Masefield

MathewJLyons: Folk memory is a powerful thing. John Masefield on his Herefordshire childhood, some 230 years after Cromwell’s death.

archivesplus: Animal stars. 1.Brownlow Farm Wythenshawe 1933, 2. John Masefield poet laureate 1958, 3. Highland cattle at Wythenshawe Park 1964, 4. Allendale Road Levenshulme 1981

AllFowledUp: I must down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life, To the gull’s way and the whale’s way where the wind’s like a whetted knife; And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover, And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick’s over. ~John Masefield

evepknapp: ellie i can never meet u in ledbury bcs if i see anyone else from john masefield i think id either drop dead or become so incredibly awkward

Robinst06252105: Some poetry, for rhythm and unravelling knots after a long day. Sea Fever by John Masefield

at_oasis: I must down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide / Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied - John Masefield

nine_below: Book 16: The Box Of Delights by John Masefield. What a disappointment! The first 100 pages or so are an effervescent joy, then it all gets bogged down in digression and tosh. The BBC adaptation has skilfully filleted this to become a classic.

AmcbToraidhe: "I must go down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life, To the gull’s way and the whale’s way where the wind’s like a whetted knife..." - John Masefield 1902

MasterInACave: "The hours that make us happy make us wise" John Masefield

airinsight: Has anyone written an aviation version of Sea-Fever by John Masefield?

wabbey: This readers read at the funeral of John Masefield.

DaveWoodArt1: Featured Art of the Day: "Sea Fever by John Masefield". Buy it at:

MasterInACave: "The hours that make us happy make us wise" John Masefield

jen_NY25: Notebook quote of the day: “Life is nothing. It is the way of life which is so much.” -John Masefield, Pompey the Great

MarineCafeBlog: A splendid song version of John Masefield's famous poem 'Sea-Fever'. Listen and download:

Mikejcraddock: In the World Cup of pieces called The Vagabond, I suggest this offering from John Ireland definitely deserves to win. Woefully underperformed, beautiful setting of Masefield poetry.

didaclopez: And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by (John Masefield)

rosalindanne: I must go down to the lonely sea & the sky. John Masefield I think, but forever Spike Milligan in my head.

neglectedbooks: Is anyone here familiar with John Masefield's 1926 novel ODTAA? ODTAA stands for "One Damn Thing After Another" and appears to be a take-off of sorts on Nostromo. Is it worth persisting past the first five pages about the geography of Santa Barbara (the fictional country)?

thaddaeusdozie: "It often happens That a thing dreaded ere it come,is nothing In the doing when it comes." John Masefield - The Entry Into Troy.

arealmofwonder: So shall I fight, so shall I tread, In this long war beneath the stars; So shall a glory wreathe my head, So shall I faint and show the scars, Until this case, this clogging mould, Be smithied all to kingly gold. ~ John Masefield

armadill2010: In this life he laughs longest who laughs last. (John Masefield)

425A4230A_O: John Masefield catches a good canter.

The_Reviewist: 2 of 5 stars to The Box of Delights by John Masefield

last_of_england: 2/2 'At this man's hand a million hearers caught An echo of the music without flaw Whose endless joy is heaven's only law O Music lovers, bless him in your thought.' By John Masefield, a detail of GER Smith's Henry Wood memorial window in St Sepulchre-without-Newgate, London.

TheWoracle: John Langford's latest venture -

AlixKroeger: I must go down to the Lea again, to the lonely Lea and the sky, And all I ask is a bicycle, and a GPS to steer it by (With apologies to John Masefield)

Expat99: Sea Fever by John Masefield | Poetry Foundation

thomaslgrimshaw: A Creed ….by John Masefield I hold that when a person dies His soul returns again to earth; Arrayed in some new flesh-disguise Another mother gives him birth. With sturdier limbs and brighter brain The old soul takes the road again. Finish:

themarchhare421: "I never saw such mud...a kind of chaos of deep running holes, broken ground, filthy chasms...old rags of wet uniforms were everywhere, and bones and legs and feet and heads were sticking out of the ground." -John Masefield

LedburyReporter: John Masefield students praised for home testing response

davidteems: Sea Fever by John Masefield. One of the poems from my childhood that got stuck in my head (among my earliest obsessions). This is a beautiful interpretation of the poem. By Kris Delmhorst

malvernlocal: John Masefield students praised for home testing response

heritage_lizzie: Such an outpouring of love & respect for Peter Ainsworth from across the heritage sector & far beyond. Thank you all. I’ll miss many things about working with him but I’m currently smiling at a text conversation about shaking up homeschool English with a bit of John Masefield...

davidgallan: “I must go down to the sea again, For the call of the running tide Is a wild call and a clear call That may not be denied.” — John Masefield

Katzontology: "I have seen flowers come in stony places, And kind things done by men with ugly faces, And the gold cup won by the worst horse at the races, So I trust too." ~ John Masefield (1878 - 1967)

MasterInACave: "The hours that make us happy make us wise" John Masefield

johnstonglenn: Elkin Mathews had an eclectic list for April 1910, including the Earl of March, Ford Madox Hueffer (Ford), John Masefield and Yone Noguchi. "Joyce’s first publisher" liked affordable and profitable editions of poetry and belles lettres. He didn't make money from Chamber Music.

__Ukasha: To most of us the future seems unsure. But then it always has been; And we who have seen great changes must have great hope - John Masefield

workshop_shoe: Corner columbine drive & john masefield(opposite mabaleng/columbine crossing) mondeor

TheRhetorRick: 4 of 5 stars to The Box of Delights by John Masefield

SharonSimcic: Sea Fever - John Masefield (Powerful Life Poetry)

rajanugrankar: Once in a century a man may be ruined or made insufferable by praise. But surely once in a minute something generous dies for want of it.--------------- —JOHN MASEFIELD

BookRarities: Folio Society: The Midnight Folk by John Masefield

tusharlaad02: "All I ask is a tall ship and stars to steer her by..." ~ John Masefield & Captain James T Kirk

Villain_MT: “I must go down to the seas again; To the lonely sea and the sky” ~ John Masefield (Sea Fever)

ShaneNagle: 'I have seen flowers come in stony places And kind things done by men with ugly faces, And the gold cup won by the worst horse at the races, So I trust, too.' - John Masefield, 'An Epilogue'.

PeterMommsen: Recommendation for Holy Week/anytime: John Masefield's mini-epic of redemption "The Everlasting Mercy." It's not in today's critical fashion. But last night I saw a performance of it - gripping, fast-paced, powerful. Everything real poetry should be.

esoundtracks: Sea Fever - John Masefield (Powerful Life Poetry)

JimCarroll7: 'I must down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky, And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by.' John Masefield, ‘Sea Fever'

raphaellecpl: "I must down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied; And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying, And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying." ― Sea Fever by John Masefield

jr_pritchard: This poem needs a new verse for the modern age: Cargos - John Masefield Quinquireme of Nineveh from distant Ophir, Rowing home to haven in sunny Palestine, With a cargo of ivory, And apes and peacocks, Sandalwood, cedarwood, and sweet white wine. ...

FionaRadic: Dirty British coaster with a salt-caked smoke stack, Butting through the Channel in the mad March days, With a cargo of Tyne coal, Road-rails, pig-lead, Firewood, iron-ware, and cheap tin trays. Cargoes, John Masefield

DaveWoodArt1: Featured Art of the Day: "Sea Fever by John Masefield". Buy it at:

HCSAspire: The style of Nellie's Lockdown poem was influenced by the style of John Masefield's Sea Fever. That, however is where the similarity ends. Nellie's created her own unique and poignant take on Lockdown. Wonderful work Nellie!

shaft9: I must down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky, And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by; And the wheel’s kick and the wind’s song and the white sail’s shaking, And a grey mist on the sea’s face, and a grey dawn breaking. Sea Fever BY JOHN MASEFIELD

nanoprofe: There are few earthly things more beautiful than a university, wrote John Masefield. He did not refer to facilities. He admired universities, because they were a place where those who hate ignorance may strive to know, where those who perceive truth may strive to make others see.

armadill2010: In this life he laughs longest who laughs last. (John Masefield)

bordercollies: I'm posting this for World Poetry Day: Sea Fever by John Masefield I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky, And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by; And the wheel’s kick and the wind’s song and the white sail’s shaking,

The_Tall_Ship: John Masefield (1878 – 1967) was appointed Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom by George V in 1930. His words are firmly rooted in lived experience as he served on a few ships, including a windjammer in 1895, only a year before the launch of our own Glenlee in 1896.

Sherborneprep: We are celebrating World Poetry Day with a poem read by Cosmo M in year 5. Cargoes (1903) by John Masefield, which is about the time when we used to transport cargo, following trade routes around the world.

amitkhanna: "The days that make us happy make us wise"- John Masefield

mukta_pathak: "The days that make us happy make us wise"- John Masefield

romanyboatman: “ I must down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky, “ John Masefield

armadill2010: In this life he laughs longest who laughs last. (John Masefield)

armadill2010: In this life he laughs longest who laughs last. (John Masefield)

Bryan15106503: I must go down to the seas again to the lonely sea and sky. And all I ask for is a tall ship and a star to guide her by. Sea Fever John Masefield.

LedburyReporter: One positive Covid case result so far at the John Masefield High School

malvernlocal: One positive Covid case result so far at the John Masefield High School

armadill2010: In this life he laughs longest who laughs last. (John Masefield)

Mammamoonmin1: John Masefield - Sea Fever

rajanugrankar: When Life knocks at the door no one can wait, When Death makes his arrest we have to go:---------------------John Masefield.

adrianmckinty: tweeting Irish poems leading up to St Patrick's Day Sea Wind is by Tom Paulin & is appropriate to our now he's in his house, bored w himself & wants to go...anywhere! its inspired by Mallarmé's poem (which I use in my twitter bio), also a bit of John Masefield in there...

DebeshiGooptu: I must down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky. John Masefield

RabbiWolpe: I have seen flowers come in stony places And kind things done by men with ugly faces And the gold cup won by the worst horse at the races, So I trust too. John Masefield.

NuckleyB: MASEFIELD, John. (1878-1967). The Taking of Helen. 8vo. London: William Heinemann Limited, 1923.



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