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AtomicKid11: culminating in his admission to a military psychiatric hospital; this resulted in his forming a friendship with Wilfred Owen, who was greatly influenced by him.

war_poets: 25 May 1918 Wilfred Owen writes to his mother ‘I want no limelight, and celebrity is the last infirmity I desire. Fame is the recognition of one’s peers. I have already more than their recognition: I have the silent and immortal friendship of Graves and Sassoon’

jcpyle1066: This poem by Wilfred Owen feels appropriate today

VPotapczuk: Have watched Terence Davies' new film 'Benediction' this afternoon. Was emotionally devastated at the end of the film, when Wilfred Owen's war poem 'Disabled' was recited as a voice-over supported by Ralph Vaughan Williams' music 'Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis'. Powerful.

abeatleshendrix: Collected War Poems of Wilfred Owen

michaelscaines: I am only conscious of any satisfaction in Scientific Reading or Thinking when it rounds off into a poetical generality and vagueness. – Wilfred Owen, May 24 1914

war_poets: 24 May 1917 Wilfred Owen is in a Stationary Hospital specializing in treating cases of ‘shell shock’. He writes ‘I feel normal today. Am sitting on the bed in the one Kimono left in this Rag Time Hospital….It is evidently Trench fever I had, but I feel fine today…’

EdinburghNapier: It was there, at Craiglockhart War Hospital during the First World War, that some of Sassoon’s and Wilfred Owen's greatest war poetry was inspired and written, and there is no better place for this special collection to be on permanent display to the public.

Mika_Lyrics: Wilfred Owen, Kinsey, Whitman and Rimbaud Thank you Warhol, thank you Patience, thank you Porter and Cocteau -<Good Guys>

war_poets: 23 May 1917 Wilfred Owen writes to his mother from the 41st Stationary Hospital ‘It is quite likely that I shall appear in the Casualty List, as Neurasthenia is marked W(ound) not S(ick)—not wrongly I think.'

WCSAEnglishDept: "Dawn massing in the east melancholy army" Exposure by Wilfred Owen

WCSAEnglishDept: "Our brains ache, in the merciless iced east winds that knife us..." Exposure by Wilfred Owen

WCSAEnglishDept: "Pale flakes with fingering stealth come feeling for our faces-" Exposure by Wilfred Owen

WCSAEnglishDept: "Shutters and doors all closed: on us the doors are closed" Exposure by Wilfred Owen

WCSAEnglishDept: "All their eyes are ice/ But nothing happens" Exposure by Wilfred Owen

william_poems: Today’s poem is “Strange Meeting” by Wilfred Owen.

thebelgianbun: So one of em has been given Howard Hughes and the other Wilfred Owen for the art festival 3d recycling model..

HistoryExtra: Siegfried Sassoon stands alongside Wilfred Owen as one of the most celebrated poets of the First World War. But although he fought with incredible bravery on the Western Front, was appalled by the carnage he witnessed around him…

MarkLudmon: Off to see Benediction, with a friend who’s never heard of Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, Ivor Novello, Glen Byam Shaw etc so it’ll be interesting to see how different the experience is for him.

TheDivineBebe: So who, other than me, thought Siegfried Sassoon died in WW1? I now realise my mistake - I was thinking of Wilfred Owen - but I'd guess I'm not the only one

war_poets: 21 May 1918 In London, Wilfred Owen writes to his mother ‘I have every chance of becoming Instructing Staff Officer to a Cadet Battalion. I would rather work in the W.O. itself and that seems not impossible either. Really I would like most to go to Egypt or Italy'

cosgriffc: Wilfred Owen, apt in these perilous times more than 100 years later.

whit_herald: The film has some focus on the relationship between Sassoon and north Shropshire poet Wilfred Owen.

SusanH175: Thank goodness for Wilfred Owen!

alibraryimplies: My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: 'Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori.' —dulce et decorum est, wilfred owen

Alfreddezayas: politicians who want to prolong the Ukraine war should reread Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front and Wilfred Owen's Anthem for doomed youth

johnsweeneyroar: Movies: Big Sleep, Casablanca, Lives of Others, Amacord, Year Of Living Dangerously, Goodnight and Good Luck. Bks: Rooster Cogburn, Three Men In A Boat, Big Sleep, Oblivion: Sergei Lebedev, On Liberty, On Psychology of Military Incompetence Poetry: Larkin, Wilfred Owen, Lermontov

war_poets: 19 May 1916 Wilfred Owen sends a postcard to his mother ‘Had 2 extractions without Gas at Dental Hospital: painful, but the worst trouble has supervened yesterday night & today. Was Grub Orderly yesterday, & have been toiling in Trenches through the heat of today.'

Comicsandlit: Just uploaded a brand new GCSE poem reading, Exposure by Wilfred Owen! I've used my comic art illustrations to bring the words to life in visuals. Check it out here:

domycustomessay: assignment 2715 This week, please listen to/read a short poem by Wilfred Owen from 1920 titled

Punks4M: Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen 1/8

trevorw1953: "What passing-bells for these who die as cattle? - Only the monstrous anger of the guns. Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle Can patter out their hasty orisons." Wilfred Owen, [Anthem for Doomed Youth]

war_poets: 18 May 1918 Wilfred Owen meets Osbert Sitwell at Robbie Ross’s home in London

gwjschenk: This looks interesting. Peter Capaldi playing the older Siegfried Sassoon; the great-great-great-grandson of poet laureate Alfred, Lord Tennyson playing Wilfred Owen...! There's some interesting links between Owen and Tennyson. Maybe I'll blog about them.

Mika_Lyrics: Wilfred Owen, Kinsey, Whitman and Rimbaud Thank you Warhol, thank you Patience, thank you Porter and Cocteau -<Good Guys>

war_poets: 17 May 1918 In London Wilfred Owen lunches with Robbie Ross at the Reform Club then visits Charles Scott Moncrieff at the War Office.

TheHallWay1: Thinking about how in The King's Man they posit that a main character's son wrote "Dulce et Decorum est" instead of Wilfred Owen and how they knew they'd get away with it because we're all dumb as shit.

Mika_Lyrics: Wilfred Owen, Kinsey, Whitman and Rimbaud Thank you Warhol, thank you Patience, thank you Porter and Cocteau -<Good Guys>

HenkbijdeWeg: Who could better say what war means than the English poet Wilfred Owen? New blog:

DewNO: "Day After Tomorrow" seems more in the spirit of Wilfred Owen, Woody Guthrie, or early Dylan (circa "Hard Rain's a-Gonna Fall") than the late 60s/early 70s folk scene. Apocalyptic, biblical imagery, questioning the social norms that led here, feelings of inevitability

war_poets: 16 May 1918 Wilfred Owen arrives in London at the start of his three-day leave.

Mika_Lyrics: Wilfred Owen, Kinsey, Whitman and Rimbaud Thank you Warhol, thank you Patience, thank you Porter and Cocteau -<Good Guys>

HossainNilofar: “Escape? There is one unwatched way: your eyes. O Beauty! Keep me good that secret gate.” ― Wilfred Owen © Andrew Montgomery

rhubarb_crumbl: discovering after 12 years of knowing him that my ex doesn't even know who wilfred owen is i'm ?????????

thfc_owen: Can they please bring Wilfred back into doctor who

FlanTheMan100: 41) There is no romance in tragedy. It's a juvenile premise. World War I poet Wilfred Owen put it best. "The old lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori." Trust him, he would know. End.

monamiecc: Wilfred Owen writing Dulce et Decorum est

LHistory99: A statue commemorating the life of WW1 poet Wilfred Owen was unveiled in Hamilton Park in November 2018 for the anniversary of his death. Owen was educated in Birkenhead institute and died in the First World War along with 87 other pupils from the institute.

christteach: He then told me he had changed his mind about joining the army cos he was thinking lots about Wilfred Owen! So is going to volunteer on a farm and work towards being a zookeeper instead. It was awesome and made my week.

lindasgrant: Still not had Covid. I’m going to be the Wilfred Owen of the pandemic.

GivingCuppa: Make that every coffin... The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori. ~ Wilfred Owen

tmbc_culture: There's not long left to see the Wilfred Owen and the Manchester Regiment display at Portland Basin Museum. Including Anthony Padgett's bust of the poet and prints by Denis May. Closes Sun 15th

myhomeworkgeeks: Exposure Wilfred Owen

war_poets: 10 May 1916 Wilfred Owen writes to the poem ‘To’ Three rompers run together hand in hand. The middle boy stops short, the others hurtle: What bumps, what shrieks, what laughter turning turtle.

war_poets: 10 May 1917 Wilfred Owen writes to his mother ‘How are you rationing? The French hereabouts subsist chiefly on Dandelion Salad. I am not joking. The young leaves with oil make an excellent supper. Tell me how you find it.'

lindseyhilsum: Wilfred Owen’s ‘Inspection’. A reflection on military parades. Blood's dirt,' he laughed, looking away, Far off to where his wound had bled And almost merged for ever into clay. 'The world is washing out its stains,' he said.

christopher_clp: Thanks Isabelle, I remember back 8n 2012 doing this as Wilfred Owen with an underscore.

war_poets: 8 May 1916 Wilfred Owen writes to his mother ‘I deduce that there are two things, and no more, which cause distinctions to disappear from between men: they are Animal Sports and Mortal Danger'

war_poets: 8 May 1917 Wilfred Owen writes 'living so long by poor old Cock Robin (as we used to call-2/Lt. Gaukroger), who lay not only near by, but in various places around and about, if you understand'

karanheer_: “Strange Meeting is a poem about war, but it doesn't focus on heroic deeds or grand victories. Instead, the poem treats war as horrifying, wasteful, and dehumanizing.”

tonyoconn1: Wilfred Owen - Witley. 1916: “This afternoon I borrowed a very groggy bicycle and rode through Godalming to Guildford, in perfect weather.. Guildford is an old town of great charm - suggestions of Shrewsbury. I had tea in an old casement overlooking the High Street”- (SCC 2019)

blacktelescope: For the next 30 weeks I will mostly be discussing the Chartists through the prism of Wilfred Owen, as read by Tracey Emin.

rrban014: "Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori" (How sweet and honourable it is to die for one's country) ----Wilfred Owen.

waterloobot: p.s. wilfred owen to siegfried sassoon—1917: And you have fixed my Life—however short. You did not light me: I was always a mad comet; but you have fixed me. 9/25/20 3:21 AM

miltonwrites: Both Ernst Jünger and Wilfred Owen are great war writers because they are pure distillations of human types. The man more warrior than patriot, who glories in the conflict. And the man engulfed by moral horror at what he sees in the trenches.

alibraryimplies: My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: 'Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori.' —dulce et decorum est, wilfred owen

johnlockeactor: Wonderful experience filming a short with the outstanding talent, Director, Tajona Karhu

lindseyhilsum: Spring Offensive by Wilfred Owen So, soon they topped the hill, and raced together Over an open stretch of herb and heather Exposed. And instantly the whole sky burned With fury against them; and soft sudden cups Opened in thousands for their blood

war_poets: 4 May 1915 Wilfred Owen, still a civilian, arrives in Paris, where he saw the sights and was entertained by the poet Tailhade.

war_poets: 4 May 1917 Wilfred Owen writes to his mother from the 13th Casualty Clearing Station ‘We are a cheery crowd here this time, and I like everyone as a great & interesting fellow. Some of us have been sent down here as a little mad. Possibly I am among them.’

war_poets: 4 May 1918 Wilfred Owen writes to his mother saying that he has had the inspiration for the final stanza of the poem which will become ‘The Send-Off’

ljonny01: "Your voice sings not so soft Though even as wind murmuring through raftered loft. Your dear voice is not dear Gentle, and evening clear As theirs whom none now hear Now earth has stopped their piteous mouths that coughed" ~ Wilfred Owen 1893 -1918

FypPower: Dulce Et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen.

alibraryimplies: My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: 'Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori.' —dulce et decorum est, wilfred owen

alolikadutt: The pallor of girls’ brows shall be their pall; Their flowers the tenderness of patient minds, And each slow dusk a drawing-down of blinds. — Wilfred Owen Anthem for Doomed Youth

alibraryimplies: My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: 'Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori.' —dulce et decorum est, wilfred owen

BobClimko: “All a poet can do today is warn.” Wilfred Owen

astrophytum19: The whole life Wilfred Owen biographical novel Book II available on Amazon as a print book and as an eBook

astrophytum19: Book III of the whole life WILFRED OWEN novel available on Amazon as a printed book and as an ebook

war_poets: 3 May 1918 Wilfred Owen writes 'Arms and the Boy' 'Let the boy try along this bayonet-blade How cold steel is, and keen with hunger of blood'

themagnusbot: Statement of Staff Sergeant Clarence Berry, regarding his time serving with Wilfred Owen in the Great War.

war_poets: 2 May 1917 Wilfred Owen is evacuated from Savy Wood suffering from shell shock

christopher_clp: Another poem by Wilfred Owen called Anthem of Doomed Youth.

PhilKlay: In case you missed my long essay on Wilfred Owen, Ernst Junger, Tim O’Brien, David Jones, Seamus Heaney, and, of course, R.A. The Rugged Man.

FypPower: Another poem by Wilfred Owen called Anthem of Doomed Youth.

ColinMylrea: I also have to say that mentioning RA the Rugged Man and Wilfred Owen in the same essay makes it feel laser-targeted to me.

myhomeworkgeeks: War Poetry Wilfred Owen

scforbes1965: Dulce et Decorum est.....Poem by Wilfred Owen....a message to our war mongering politicans

TheWWImuseum: In stark contrast to Kilmer's poem - "Disabled" by Wilfred Owen. "He sat in a wheeled chair, waiting for dark, / And shivered in his ghastly suit of grey, / Legless, sewn short at elbow.

MJadrool: Wilfred Owen can’t seem to relax and often goes on longer than needed. I’d cut stanzas 3-6 in workshop, but I can’t resist them either even though on average they bring the poem down. It’s all a delight, a depressing delight.

AMaskedMadman: This particular part is Anthem for Doomed Youth by Wilfred Owen. Absolutely. Perfect.

war_poets: 28 April 1918 Wilfred Owen writes ‘Have been further than Boroughbridge to Aldborough where there are Roman Remains and the finest tessellated pavement in Britain. […] If in 1913 I used to wish to have lived in the 4th Century, how much more now!’

Spill_Words: Anthem For Doomed Youth a poem by Wilfred Owen   What passing-bells for these who die as cattle? Only the monstrous anger of the guns. Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle Can patter out their hasty orisons. No

444fenn: i love the poem dulce et decorum est by wilfred owen

kerrywales: I have always loved creating backstories. Adding those layers on how a character to speaks and why. Whether their voice is flat or rich. Joyous or dull. A self tape today included a Wilfred Owen poem read by someone in the 1920s. Loved planning and doing that

myhomeworkgeeks: Poems by Wilfred Owen and Rupert Brooke

Mika_Lyrics: Wilfred Owen, Kinsey, Whitman and Rimbaud Thank you Warhol, thank you Patience, thank you Porter and Cocteau -<Good Guys>

astrophytum19: Book II of whole life biographical novel on the life of Wilfred Owen - all three volumes now available from Amazon in hard copy and eBook formats

newcastlechoral: But what really gives that music an emotional impact is the poignant nature of the words, which borrow from such varied voices as Sara Teasdale, Wilfred Owen, Oscar Wilde, Edward Thomas, Robert Burns and Turing himself. (2/4)



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