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LeoTheLess: Everyone is superstitious enough, is avaricious enough, is indifferent enough or cruel enough, to understand the extremes of these things in others, if he really let himself appreciate himself. "Look in thy heart and write," said Sir Philip Sidney. p. 212

orpheus_laments: Sonnet VII: When Nature by Sir Philip Sidney

RandoNewsBot: Jayson Tatum scores 46 points and Celtics dominate Bucks, 108-95, to force Game 7 - The Boston Globe. 108 is there number of love sonnets in Astrophil and Stella, the first English sonnet sequence by Sir Philip Sidney

ham_prints: James Stow, Death of Sir Philip Sidney, 18th-19th century

jdmccafferty: The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia / written by Sir Philip Sidney, with his life and death ... 1598, the 3rd edition. This copy is embossed with the Arms of Elizabeth I (Royal Collection Trust, HM EII)

0xblackdiamond: With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb'st the skies! -Sir Philip Sidney

Muhamma52812915: Now the Prince and the Princess will take a small break from Sir Philip Sidney as they are halfway through and tie a spiritual knot here at Cambridge to elevate their spirits and moods.

Muhamma52812915: The Prince and the Princess are done with Sir Philip Sidney here at Cambridge. They read about 21,632 words in about 110 minutes at an average of about 197 words per minute and 3 words per second. The Princess believes, we read it pretty meticulously.

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!

Muhamma52812915: Now the Prince and the Princess are at the Cambridge library. They'll read Sir Philip Sidney there till 4:30 p.m.

5h4nny: read sonnet 31 and i dare you to tell me that sir philip sidney wasnt an incel

Ed_Shakes1: Sir Philip Sidney (1554-86) was the son of Sir Henry Sidney and Lady Mary Dudley, sister of Robert Sidney (a patron of the Arts). MSH was his youngest sister. Both were poets: he dedicated his Arcadia to her, which she rewrote after his death; and they wrote the Sidney Psalms.

Ed_Shakes1: The places where TRANSGRESS+ appears sometimes (6/15) strongly resemble the MSH style (e.g. KJ 1.1 263-8 Lady F; RoL 682-8 and 1529-35) but not always, despite a high overall letter/word mean of 4.22. It's possible that passages in e.g. LLL, MAAN and TGV are by Sir Philip Sidney.

V_and_A_Bot: Procession of the Obsequies of Sir Philip Sidney, 1587

MahdiCain: By "Pamela" All Sweetness "Crest" Waning Waxing Moon the Small Bright Hope is True Amanda Knox shall be Released from Prison in Italy prior to Sunday November 6, 2022. Pamela is Coined for Sir Philip Sidney's 1580s Poem "Arcadia." Arcadia means Simple Pleasure and Quiet.

TheMundaneMuse: At 30: Sir Philip Sidney didn't think Plato/Socrates was being serious. So... At 40: I don't care what Sidney thought. Banish the poets. All of them.

myhomeworkgeeks: Sir Philip Sidney

EzuieQuotes: "Either I will find a way, or I will make one." - Philip Sidney

nekomessiah144: What kind of sonnet is Astrophil and Stella? Elizabethan sonnet Astrophel and Stella, an Elizabethan sonnet sequence of 108 sonnets, interspersed with 11 songs, by Sir Philip Sidney, written in 1582 and published posthumously in 1591.

Noz_Trey: "I'm NOT Sir Philip bleedin' Sidney!"

nekomessiah144: What are the characteristics of Sir Philip Sidney poetry?

SteveLeoGrace1: ....With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb'st the skies! How silently, and with how wan a face! What, may it be that even in heav'nly place That busy archer his sharp arrows tries! Sure, if that long-with love-acquainted eyes...   SIR PHILIP SIDNEY.....

william_poems: Today’s poem is Sonnet 31 of “Astrophel and Stella” by Sir Philip Sidney.

nekomessiah144: Sir Philip Sidney was a Troubadour

nekomessiah144: That is to say, the Renaissance poets played games with language. They did so from the baseline of the Petrarchan sonnet, and Sir Philip Sidney stands out because he both played and commented on the playing—imitated Petrarch and criticized Petrarch—while mastering the form.

Page_Upon_Page: Aphorisms of Sir Philip Sidney. Volume I (Published: 1807) Full text:

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!

RobertAllenPoet: The Sunday Poets are working hard on a poetic treat we've got for you. Thus great with child to speak and helpless in my throes, Biting my truant pen, beating myself for spite, "Fool," said my Muse to me, "look in thy heart, and write." - Sir Philip Sidney Details on Monday

LadueNews: “Head Over Heels” is based on the 16th-century prose pastoral romance, “The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia,” written by Sir Philip Sidney.

RobertHWoodman: No sword bites so fiercely as an evil tongue. ~Sir Philip Sidney

chrisbarker1996: “In wonted walks, since wonted fancies change…” -Sir Philip Sidney, Certain Sonnets 18

merton32996231: Sir Philip Sidney's 1593 poem ARCADIA for the most part features characters with classical greek names, but the most popular character in the poem is named Pamela. this is the first recorded use of the name, and its generally agreed that Sidney made it up

tacobender29: They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts. Sir Philip Sidney

thvdeus: yassification of sir philip sidney

juri_renee: Happy Valentines Day! an old clip but classic of my favorite Sherlock Holmes, Jeremy Brett, reading love poetry of Sir Philip Sidney:

BT4u2c: They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts. - Sir Philip Sidney

packwoodhaugh: Our Year 6 pupils, Ivo, Lucas and Willow, have thoroughly enjoyed their afternoon at Shrewsbury School, as finalists of the Sir Philip Sidney Essay Competition. A great opportunity to meet other young writers and participate in a series of thought-provoking workshops.

ANameOfABot: Sir Philip Sidney: Sure, if that long-with-love-acquainted eyes Can judge of love, thou feel’st a lover’s case; I read it in thy looks; thy languished grace To me, that feel the like, thy state descries …

MarkSav23240868: Not amnesia. It's Sir Philip Sidney for yours truly.

ANameOfABot: Sir Philip Sidney: Sure, if that long-with-love-acquainted eyes Can judge of love, thou feel’st a lover’s case; I read it in thy looks; thy languished grace To me, that feel the like, thy state descries …

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!

Read_Instead: TFW a student asks you what the sentence structure is in the last line of a Sir Philip Sidney sonnet and you blank out like Will Farrell in Old School and you tell them it is a chiasmus, you come to and google it and you were right.

ANameOfABot: Sir Philip Sidney: Sure, if that long-with-love-acquainted eyes Can judge of love, thou feel’st a lover’s case; I read it in thy looks; thy languished grace To me, that feel the like, thy state descries …

KathLangrish: What fairy tales were told in England & Scotland during the 16th century? - the kind Sir Philip Sidney described as holding children from play and old men from the chimney corner? Clue: wishing tables, heads in wells, giants, elf-kings...

ChurchLifeND: Literary language, as Sir Philip Sidney says, “figures forth good things.” In so doing, it is virtuous in and of itself, and it figures forth virtue in the reader as well. --Karen Swallow-Prior

nekomessiah144: Sir Philip Sidney has a lot of narrative poems that take hours to conclude and he sang them kind of like Homer sang his Epics during antiquity, but who does this in music now at all?

rose_is_: Sir Philip Sidney on how to overcome writer’s block: “‘Fool,’ said my Muse to me, ‘look in thy heart, and write.’”

StereoRooster: Astrophil and Stella 1: Loving in truth, and fain in verse my love to show BY SIR PHILIP SIDNEY

ZNSBahamas242: During his tribute in the House of Assembly, Prime Minister & Min. of Finance the Hon. Philip Davis said that, as Bahamians mourn its nation’s loss, they marvel at how far Sir Sidney traveled, and the courage it must have required.

OurNewsRev: Happening Now: PM Giving Tribute to Sir Sidney Prime Minister Philip Davis giving a tribute to Sir Sidney Poitier in the House of Assembly at this hour. Sir Sidney died last Thursday at his home in California; he was 94.

ewnewsbahamas: FOLLOWING: Tributes for the late Sir Sidney Poitier continued in Parliament today with Prime Minister Philip Davis and Opposition Leader Michael Pintard honoring the memory of the visionary actor who died on Friday.

hafsahmed1_: I read it in thy looks; thy languish'd grace To me that feel the like, thy state descries Sir Philip Sidney >>

Quicktake: "As Sir Sidney said himself in his autobiography, 'You don't have to become something you are not to be better than you were.'" Bahamas PM Philip Davis fondly reflected on the life of actor Sidney Poitier, who died Friday at 94

Eligene4: SHINE ON SIR SIDNEY: Prime Minister Philip Davis pays tribute to beloved actor and cultural icon Sir Sidney Poitier

winnmediaskn: Prime Minister Philip Davis pays tribute to beloved actor and cultural icon Sir Sidney Poitier -

RodJennings3: I'm watching Prime Minister Hon. Philip Davis statement on the passing of Sir Sidney Poitier on Black Star Network

JamaicaObserver: Bahamian Prime Minister Philip Davis Friday instructed that the Bahamian flag be flown at half-mast as he led the nation in paying respect to the iconic actor, activist, director and ambassador, Sir Sidney Poitier, who died at the age of 94.

Quicktake: "As Sir Sidney said himself in his autobiography, 'You don't have to become something you are not to be better than you were.'" Bahamas PM Philip Davis fondly reflected on the life of actor Sidney Poitier, who died Friday at 94

ewnewsbahamas: SHINE ON SIR SIDNEY: Prime Minister Philip Davis pays tribute to beloved actor and cultural icon Sir Sidney Poitier

ForeignPolicyWD: Live Statement by Prime Minister Hon. Philip Davis on the passing of Sir Sidney Poitier.

GuardianNassau: Prime Minister Philip Brave Davis said he has instructed that the Bahamian flag be flown at half-mast in The Bahamas and at Bahamian embassies around the world in honor of award-winning actor Sir Sidney Poitier, who died last night.

Mirvish: Sir Sidney Poitier (Feb 20, 1927 - January 6, 2022) performed twice at The Royal Alex in 1947 and again in 1948 in the play Anna Lucasta by Philip Jordan which was inspired by Eugene O’Neill’s Anna Christie.

AnselmGibbs: "The boy who moved from the tomato farm of Cat Island to become a waiter in the United States... The man who expressed his rage against racial injustice through quiet dignity." - Bahamas Prime Minister Philip Davis following death of Sir Sidney Poitier

alexleff: Live statement by Bahamas' prime minister on the passing of Sir Sidney Poitier:

caribbeanblock: The Prime Minister of the Bahamas Hon. Philip Davis made a statement on the Passing of Sir Sidney Poitier & indicated that the Bahamian Flag will be flown at half mast in honor of Sir Sidney Poitier

POPSUGAR: Bahamian Prime Minister Hon. Philip Davis gave a tribute to Sir Sidney Poitier, detailing the actor's journey from being self-taught how to read and write to the prolific Hollywood actor.

jasperward94: Prime Minister Philip Brave Davis said the entire Bahamas mourns the death of Sir Sidney Poitier. He described Poitier, who was the first Black man to win an Academy Award for Best Actor, as "a great Bahamian".

rolandsmartin: Prime Minister Hon. Philip Davis statement on the passing of Sir Sidney Poitier

OurNewsRev: Prime Minister Philip Davis remembering Sir Sidney Poitier who passed away last night. Sir Sidney was the first black Bahamian to win an Academy Award. He was 94.

opmthebahamas: Standby for a live statement by Prime Minister Hon. Philip Davis on the death of Sir Sidney Poitier live on the Office of the Prime Minister’s Facebook page

Quicktake: "As Sir Sidney said himself in his autobiography, 'You don't have to become something you are not to be better than you were.'" Bahamian PM Philip Davis fondly reflected on the life of actor Sidney Poitier, who died Friday at 94

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!

bigtiiiiiiimeee: shall not want Honour in Heaven For I shall meet Sir Philip Sidney And have talk with Coriolanus And other heroes of that kidney. I shall not want Capital in Heaven For I shall meet Sir Alfred Mond: We two shall lie together, lapt/

cubsgirl1825: now disappointed in myself for not using the word “sonneteer” in my paper about the dead & sir philip sidney

oshawols: sir philip sidney writing his sonnets

Janeyjoy: I invested in three symbolic modern clocks as Prizes for the Milton-centred Essay Writing Competition. I would now like to announce a Drawing and/ or Painting Competition: The Subject of the Painting/Drawing Must be taken from Sir Philip Sidney's 'Arcadia'.

alacrates: Florio practiced the art of memory, translated Montaigne's Essays into English, edited Sir Philip Sidney's Arcadia after Sidney's death, & was a friend to Edmund Spencer... many phrases from Florio's works can be found in Shakespeare's plays, which he may have collaborated on...

johnevigar: Wednesday’s delight. Elizabeth Sidney, daughter of Sir Philip Sidney and wife of the 5th Earl of Rutland. Bottesford Church, Leicestershire

poetictouch: Astrophil and Stella - Sonnet 1 by Sir Philip Sidney - Read by Jasper Britton

Ernest_Robyn: The thing is, I really believe in what we do in literature classes. There is a reason that, going back to the 16th century and earlier (hello, Cicero), Sir Philip Sidney argued that poetry - not history, not philosophy - is the best teacher. I'm not saying I agree w him /

dumanseema: "While you live you live in love and never get favor for lacking skill of a sonnet and when you die your memory die from the earth for want of an epitaph" demiş Sir Philip Sidney

Chickenlyfe1: Who by eating chocolate doth chocolate know -Sir Philip Sidney

aslihaneceaydin: Astrophil ile Stella Soneler, Sir Philip Sidney

MarkSav23240868: Shakespeare's Muse of Fire - Sir Philip Sidney

HarryWatson63: Sonnet 31 from Sir Philip Sidney’s Astrophil and Stella With how sad steps, O moon, thou climb’st the skies; How silently, and with how wan a face. What, may it be that even in heavenly place That busy archer his sharp arrows tries.....

PP_Rubens: Almost missed the birthday (1554) of Sir Philip Sidney. Poet, courtier, and in general the fairest flower of Elizabethan knighthood.

RoyalUniverse: Sir Philip Sidney, poet and courtier to Elizabeth I, was born on 30 November 1554

ShinyHistGems: Born on this day: Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586), a significant Elizabethan courtier, poet, scholar and soldier

HBurpday: November 30 Today is the anniversary of the birth of Philip Sidney (1554) Jonathan Swift (1667) Oliver Winchester (1810) Mark Twain (1835) Sir Winston Churchill (1874) Lucy Maud Montgomery (1874) Efrem Zimbalist Jr (1918) Virginia Mayo (1920) 1/2

CelebBirthdayUK: November 30 Today is the anniversary of the birth of Philip Sidney Jonathan Swift Oliver Winchester Mark Twain Sir Winston Churchill Lucy Maud Montgomery Efrem Zimbalist Jr Virginia Mayo 1/2

robertmaclean: Homer, the Bible, Shakespeare, Matthew Arnold,

CatholicPods: Is Sir Philip Sidney's Apology for Poetry worth reading or is there some other preferable work?

AmitMajmudar: Odysseus’s dog that recognizes him after his travels, Yudhishtir’s dog who accompanies him to heaven, Cerberus in the Inferno…. Here is another literary dog, who provokes Sir Philip Sidney’s jealousy. Any other famous poetic dogs/dog poems out there? Do share…

PersonaKingdom: 'But what? I deserve to be pounded' ~ Sir Philip Sidney Finally, a relatable Englishman.

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!

RobertHWoodman: No sword bites so fiercely as an evil tongue. ~Sir Philip Sidney

faeriehxart: "fool," said my muse to me, "look in thy heart, and write." - astropil and stella 1 (sir philip sidney)

DodgeyDog: Lady Mary Wroth niece to Sir Philip Sidney - an interesting rather overlooked lady of talent

c_limtolentino: i really read all 22 pages of this just for sir philip sidney himself to tell me that this entire essay was an “ink-wasting toy” of his that i had the “evil luck to read”



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Poem of the day

Ernest Dowson Poem
Vain Hope
 by Ernest Dowson

Sometimes, to solace my sad heart, I say,
Though late it be, though lily-time be past,
Though all the summer skies be overcast,
Haply I will go down to her, some day,
And cast my rests of life before her feet,
That she may have her will of me, being so sweet
And none gainsay!

...

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