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welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!

RobertHWoodman: No sword bites so fiercely as an evil tongue. ~Sir Philip Sidney

skydog811: Getting to know Sir Philip Sidney | OUPblog

tonyriches: Getting to know Sir Philip Sidney: We know so much about him: more than about almost any other Englishman of his time. And yet there is still much we have to guess at.

ortizleadership: "They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts." -Sir Philip Sidney

UNCECL: “Foole, said my Muse to me, looke in thy heart and write.” Sir Philip Sidney Astrophil and Stella

BeineckeLibrary: A book of 65 letters to Elizabethan poet Sir Philip Sidney is on view at the Beinecke: http://t.co/DfqV2UCnVe http://t.co/Z2qlRF6ApS

nonneemouse: ‘My true love hath my heart’ - Sir Philip Sidney.

Wisdoms_Quotes_: "The ingredients of health and long life, are great temperance, open air, easy labor, and little care." Sir Philip Sidney

UniversalXport5: It is not a good idea to wake a sleeping lion. -Sir Philip Sidney

MelanieJaxn: Sweet garden-nymph, which keeps the cherry-tree Whose fruit doth far the Hesperian taste surpass, Most sweet-fair, most fair-sweet, do not, alas, From coming near those cherries banish me. -Sir Philip Sidney

eingedichtvonx: sir philip sidney, astrophil ile stella, 22. sone

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!

VerbalX: "It is the nature of the strong heart, that like the palm tree it strives ever upwards when it is most burdened."- Sir Philip Sidney -

dr_mcgilchrist: Daily Poetry Readings: Day Forty Four Dr Iain McGilchrist reads a sonnet, Astrophil and Stella 31, by Sir Philip Sidney who was a poet, courtier, scholar and soldier and one of the most prominent figures of the Elizabethan age. For latest updates and n…

dpriest: Samsung this predictive text is slowly turning me into Sir Philip Sidney. Come on, let's get to the point!

dpriest: I feel like I never realized until now that Sir Philip Sidney died at 32. Wow, that guy was an early bloomer!

odnb: Discover the life of Mary Herbert, countess of Pembroke, writer, & literary patron. Co-authoring 'Psalmes' with brother and fellow writer Sir Philip Sidney, Herbert became one of the first women to achieve a major reputation for her literary contributions.

markovdog: they don't want you smoking expensive cigs reading sir philip sidney to irish girls famous for their merino wool knitting and animal crossing designs

AngieJi66384568: Sir Philip Sidney an Apology for Poetry attached

wannabecorsaire: And even historiographers, although their lips sound of things done and verity be written in their foreheads, have been glad to borrow both fashion and perchance weight of the poets. Sir Philip Sidney "The Defense of Poesy"

wannabecorsaire: There is no art delivered to mankind that hath not the works of nature for his principal object, without which they could not consist, and on which they so depend as they become actors and players, as it were, of what nature will have set forth. Sir Philip Sidney (1)

ajvenigalla: Two good poetic translations from the English renaissance of two psalms, by Mary Sidney, the brother of Sir Philip Sidney:

MikeReadUK: Yes, it's an amazing place. I've done the odd history thing there in the past. The birthplace of Sir Philip Sidney.

RobertHWoodman: No sword bites so fiercely as an evil tongue. ~Sir Philip Sidney

MarkSipps: A Short Analysis of Sir Philip Sidney's Sonnet 67: 'Hope, art thou true, or dost thou flatter me?'

Prof_LudovicaV: .. having slipped into the title of a poet, [I] am provoked to say something unto you in the defense of that my unelected vocation. Sir Philip Sidney, The Defence of Poesy, 1595

sjhigbee: A Short Analysis of Sir Philip Sidney’s Sonnet 67: ‘Hope, art thou true, or dost thou flatter me?’

A50Challenge: Boris Johnson ≠ Sir Philip Sidney.

Shakespeare: Pranking Sir Philip Sidney by sending him forged love letters from “Stella.” Yes, quarantine’s got a bit dull.

Softboi42: Henry Howard: "Alas! So All Things Do Now Hold Their Peace" y "The Soote Season". Thomas Wyatt: "The Long Love That Doth Harbour" (o algo así). Edmund Spenser: Amoretti 54 y 75. Sir Philip Sidney: Astrophil and Stella 1, 2, 6 and 7. William Shakespare: 3, 12, 18, 116, 126, 130

abbiegarrington: Percy's death by an arrow to the face; the schooling of Charles Darwin and Sir Philip Sidney; Tanners wines.

carmenalbaran: In Defense of Poesy -Sir Philip Sidney

robert_stagg: “But first let me rejoice with you, that since the unnoble constitution of our time doth keep us from fit employments, you do keep yourself awake with the delight of knowledge” — Sir Philip Sidney, writing to Edward Denny, 22 May 1580

glvno: Anheuser-Busch InBev should really create an amaro-type digestif type liqueur and call it Astrophil so I can hit da club and say hey there barkeep hit me with a Sir Philip Sidney

fancy62629: The ingredients of health and long life, are great temperance, open air, easy labor, and little care. -Sir Philip Sidney

scottalars: “The ingredients of health and long life are great temperance, open-air, easy labor, and little care.” -Sir Philip Sidney

Neocento: . They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts. - Sir Philip Sidney -

DevdasKakati: "Thy need is greater than mine." What a brave, noble man he was! The name of Sir Philip Sidney will never be for-got-ten; for it was the name of a Christian gentleman who always had the good of others in his mind.

SchoolDepotCoUk: Sidney, Sir Philip

freakindelight: Maybe . . . ~Sir Philip Sidney~

ScarfoJ: “So strangely (alas) thy works in me prevail, That in my woes for thee thou art my joy. And in my joys for thee my only annoy.” -Sir Philip Sidney, Astrophil and Stella

MasterInACave: "The ingredients of health and long life, are great temperance, open air, easy labor, and little care" Sir Philip Sidney

_seanwesley: "they are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts." - sir philip sidney

mgoldfarb999: The phrase “laughingstock” in 1533 … Per

elyssa04960394: Reading sonnets by Sir Philip Sidney, this should be a treat!

redhairmythos: Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586). "Portraits of many of Lord De L’Isle’s forebears hang in the Tudor Long Gallery, not least that of red-haired Sir Philip Sidney, the poet and epitome of Elizabethan chivalry."

FranzForlorn: 'The poet is the monarch of the sciences' says Sir Philip Sidney, 'for he doth not only show the way, but gives so sweet a prospect into the way as will entice any man to enter into it.'

quotio: They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts. ~Sir Philip Sidney

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TterThe: Thus great with child to speak and helpless in my throes, Biting my truant pen, beating myself for spite, ‘Fool,’ said my Muse to me, ‘look in thy heart, and write.’ “Loving in Truth” -Sir Philip Sidney (3)

MasterInACave: "The ingredients of health and long life, are great temperance, open air, easy labor, and little care" Sir Philip Sidney

jeales1: Does anyone know where Sir Philip Sidney's will is to be found? The DNB entry does not mention its whereabouts, but does refer to its contents.

GCoatalen: Calf? The other thing is the typed details, how ugly!

OWC_Oxford: "Biting my truant pen, beating myself for spite,/‘Fool,’ said my Muse to me; ‘look in thy heart and write.’" - Sir Philip Sidney

8minutesidle: Didn’t know going in this would mainly be about Sir Philip Sidney and the plague, but seems appropriate.

cwasper: sir philip sidney this is a direct callout, youre nothing and i hate you

its3lialhani: They are never alone that are accompanied with nobel thoughts. -Sir Philip Sidney

tacobender29: They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts. Sir Philip Sidney

ShropArchives: We are very pleased to announce that the Friends of Shropshire Archives have raised enough money for us to conserve the unique manuscript of the Life of Sir Philip Sidney by Fulke Greville (6001/295). A big thank you to everyone who contributed to this appeal. (ImagePR/3/458)

RobertHWoodman: No sword bites so fiercely as an evil tongue. ~Sir Philip Sidney

MrsSimpson1779: I know 'tis daft for a woman of my mature years to tell of such things:- but when I would wander the woods & fields as a young gel, 'twas always He - or dear, gentlemanly & courageous Sir Philip Sidney who accompanied me. (Tho once or twice I helped dashing Charles II to safety)

quotio: They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts. ~Sir Philip Sidney

judsontaylor: For Hume, poets were “liars by profession.” For Sir Philip Sidney, the poet "affirmeth" nothing and "therefore never lieth.” When, exactly, does literature lie?

amyjay1994: The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia (Old Arcadia) by Sir Philip Sidney: 4⭐ A wild, entertaining story with a hybrid structure. This was everything I wanted from a Renaissance pastoral comedy.

AGFNigeria: "The ingredients of health and long life, are great temperance, open air, easy labor, and medical checkup."- Sir Philip Sidney The importance of regular medical checkup cannot be overemphasized. If you haven't inculcated the habit of medical checkup, please, begin to do so.

robert_stagg: Love’s Labour’s Lost “seems imitated with its defects and its beauties from Sir Philip Sidney” (Samuel Taylor Coleridge)

orapronobisdeum: I beg no subiect to use eloquence, Nor in hid ways to guide philosophy: Looke at my hands for no such quintessence; But know that I in pure simplicity Breathe out the flames which burn within my heart, Love only reading unto me this art - Sir Philip Sidney

orapronobisdeum: And yet could not, by rising morn foresee How fair a day was near: O punished eyes, That I had been more foolish, or more wise! - Sir Philip Sidney

hfan50: Sir Philip Sidney took the manuscript of 'Arcadia' and threw it at his sister's feet and said, 'There it is, it's finished.'" Peculiarly enough, as a person, I am not interested much in individuals, even my closest friends. They could have deep secrets, and I would never ask them

mirafzal72: The Nightingale or Philomena by Sir Philip Sidney: Summary, Analysis and Questions

firewolf170: Writing for fun: Behold, a treatise defending the potential for video games and interactive media as an emergent form of immersive storytelling, in the formal style of Sir Philip Sidney's Defense of Poesy! Writing job applications: Am grad. Write gud. Am hungry. Please...pay.

charitylee92: You have no taste, you'll never be in love, and everyone will forget you when you die - Sir Philip Sidney Imagine being a savage in 1595

PoetryTrain: Shakespeare's Muse of Fire - Sir Philip Sidney

codysmithpoet: Sir Philip Sidney's "Astrophel and Stella: Sonnet Number 47" sent me down a prelim rabbit hole that led to this.

SolAletor: "They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts.” - Sir Philip Sidney

MarkSipps: A Short Analysis of Sir Philip Sidney's Astrophil and Stella Sonnet 99

CT_Bergstrom: Google scholar: Four hundred and twenty two years after publishing Astrophel and Stella, Sir Philip Sidney is back. (Actual link is to a Russian wikipedia page about Sir Philip).

juanwitt: "Only actions give life strength; only moderation gives it a charm." - Jean Paul Richter "They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts." - Sir Philip Sidney

aldaily: For Hume, poets were “liars by profession.” For Sir Philip Sidney, the poet "affirmeth" nothing and "therefore never lieth.” When, exactly, does literature lie?

JuanaGa61795331: For Hume, poets were “liars by profession.” For Sir Philip Sidney, the poet "affirmeth" nothing and "therefore never lieth.” When, exactly, does literature lie?

philosophynws: For Hume, poets were “liars by profession.” For Sir Philip Sidney, the poet "affirmeth" nothing and "therefore never lieth.” When, exactly, does literature lie?: For Hume, poets were “liars by profession.” For Sir Philip Sidney, the poet…

Kairpra: Fool," said my muse to me. "Look in thy heart and write. Sir Philip Sidney, Astrophel And Stella

orapronobisdeum: At length to love’s decrees I, forced, agreed, Yet with repining at so partial lot. Now even that footstep of lost liberty Is gone, and now like slave-born Muscovite I call it praise to suffer tyranny - Sir Philip Sidney

orapronobisdeum: Speaking of sonnets, this is my favorite: from Astrophel and Stella, Sir Philip Sidney

DrAbeDavies: G. W. Pigman III on the Oxford volume of elegies celebrating Sir Philip Sidney, which was pipped to the post by Cambridge's by over a year: 'The most genuine emotion in much of the /Exequiae/ is irritation at Cambridge.'

SchoolDepotCoUk: Sidney, Sir Philip

EpzGlobal: "In the performance of a good action a man not only benefits himself, but he confers a blessing on others" Sir Philip Sidney

historylitmed: Adam considers poetry and the trope of ‘rhyming to death’ used by Swift and, earlier, Sir Philip Sidney

mi_mcca: It is the nature of the strong heart, that like the palm tree it strives ever upwards when it is most burdened. - Sir Philip Sidney

RobertHWoodman: No sword bites so fiercely as an evil tongue. ~Sir Philip Sidney

KworldMy: Seriously, Alexander Pope and Sir Philip Sidney,... why couldn't they appear on the exam???

patrickbitature: "Each excellent thing, once learned , serves for a measure of all other knowledge." Sir Philip Sidney. Here's to being excellent this week. Good morning everyone.

oshawols: nothing against sir philip sidney but I'm so tired of an apology for poetry ugh

Artemis93159239: ‘My true love hath my heart and I have his ... ...His heart in me keeps me and him in one; My heart in him his thoughts and senses guides: He loves my heart, for once it was his own; I cherish his because in me it bides’ ... [Sir Philip Sidney]

raitogroyper: Imagine wasting all that time reading Sir Philip Sidney's Arcadia and still writing like a BAP orbiter. Should've kept it Wikipedia.

Shakespeare: No one on bumble believes I’m really me. I kept getting reported and banned. Now I’m on bumble as “Sir Philip Sidney.”

JeffreyShoulson: Today’s Poem - Seventh Song –Sir Philip Sidney Whose sense in so evil consort, their stepdame Nature lays, That ravishing delight in them most sweet tunes do not raise; Or if they do delight therein, yet are so cloyed with wit, As with...

bookbread: Fresh from Bookbread: Two Views of Arcadia from "Heidi," and Sir. Philip Sidney:

MAlhamalawy: Love is not dead but sleepeth Sir Philip Sidney



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