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burgonsoc: The curious appendage on the left shoulder is often though to be a money bag for legal fees, but is a remnant of the ancient mourning hood. A clearer view of this hood can be seen in a 1587 print of the funeral of Sir Philip Sidney.

swarnashanmugal: Oft have I mused, but now at length I find, Why those that die, men say they do depart. By Sir Philip Sidney

HorcherF: and I am missing Sir Philip Sidney.

BeautytoTruth: I also wish for sleep, Mr. Sidney!

poetictouch: Leave me, O Love, which reachest but to dust; And thou, my mind, aspire to higher things; Grow rich in that which never taketh rust; Whatever fades but fading pleasure brings. ~ Sir Philip Sidney

francisrozon: It used to be “art imitates life.” Then Sir Philip Sidney listened to Lana Del Rey and wrote The Defense of Poesy in 1572 and it became “life imitates art.”

Muhamma52812915: I am thinking about writing a Defense of Urdu Poetry in line with Sir Philip Sidney.

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions.

MayaCPopa: Happy Wonder Wednesday, friends. ✨ Today's installment is sponsored by Sir Philip Sidney's delightful phrase, "the zodiac of one’s own wit," & John of Salisbury's reference to “marvelous singularity,” or the emotional experience of wonder. More here:

marroncin: Biting my trewand pen, beating myself for spite, "fool", said my Muse to me. "Looke in thy heart and write". Astrophil and Stella, Sir Philip Sidney

RobertHWoodman: No sword bites so fiercely as an evil tongue. ~Sir Philip Sidney

etominusipi: "...For I shall meet Sir Philip Sidney And have talk with Coriolanus And other heroes of that kidney" from "A Cooking Egg" (1920) TSEliot

iswearenglish: Sonnet 1 by Sir Philip Sidney - Summary Analysis - Sonnet 1 - Astrophil and Stella by Sir Philip Sidney 1554 - 1586

JhtlMina: Astrophil and Stella by Sir Philip Sidney [Audiobooks Unabridged] Poetry Epic | Medieval

JohnWil71685113: Scroll back over my tweets/replies for the origin of Hell Hell Hell or LLL or LionL L L or look at the 2nd anagram from philip sidney's 'sir p s his astrophel and stella' Sharpe is Adonis is Sharpe. TT LLL. But its TT from the sonnets dedication.

synaesthesiapo1: Sir Philip Sidney on imagination 1579: "Only the poet [...] making things either better than nature brings forth, or, quite anew, forms such as never were in nature [...] freely ranging within the zodiac of his own wit."

ArthurLWood: A new comment on my recording of Sir Philip Sidney’s Astrophil and Stella (Sonnet One): “Your voice is so soothing.” Thank you!

CenturianTactic: "Foole said my Muse to mee, looke in thy heart and write." --Sir Philip Sidney, Astrophel and Stella (1586)

t3dy: 306 306 Sir Philip Sidney's name keeps popping up as a kind of cultural talisman, but the sympathetic magic has not worked. 315 Rosicrucianism *is* the Renaissance... the occult or hermetic tradition... is the single, defining element

rebrey: Blog post on the unfashionable art of rhetoric, via Scottish Nationalists and Sir Philip Sidney

TraceLarkhall: In which the Grocers’ Company provide pikemen for the funeral of Sir Philip Sidney in 1586

jardinsecret888: Good biographies of Sir Philip Sidney?? Please help

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!

ClareMingins: "They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts." Sir Philip Sidney

worthwhilebooks: Sir Philip Sidney’s prescription for depression:

PP_Rubens: Almost missed the birthday (1554) of the great poet Sir Philip Sidney. Courtier, soldier, and in general the fairest flower of Elizabethan knighthood.

CelebBirthdayUK: November 30 Today is the anniversary of the birth of Philip Sidney Jonathan Swift Oliver Winchester Mark Twain Sir Winston Churchill Lucy Maud Montgomery Efrem Zimbalist Jr Virginia Mayo Graham Crowden 1/2

HBurpday: November 30 Today is the anniversary of the birth of Philip Sidney (1554) Jonathan Swift (1667) Oliver Winchester (1810) Mark Twain (1835) Sir Winston Churchill (1874) Lucy Maud Montgomery (1874) Efrem Zimbalist Jr (1918) Virginia Mayo (1920) Graham Crowden (1922) 1/2

NathanFrancis__: “Biting my truant pen, beating myself for spite: "Fool!" said my muse to me, "look in thy heart, and write.” (Astrophel And Stella) Poems:

Jeremy_boypoet: Sunday Sonnet: With how sad steps by Sir Philip Sidney

peterdamianent1: Sonnet 31 - from Astrophil and Stella Sir Philip Sidney With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb'st the skies! How silently, and with how wan a face! What, may it be that even in heav'nly place That busy archer his sharp arrows tries! Sure, if...

AmLyceum: Penshurst Place is the ancestral home of the Sidney family, and was the birthplace of the immortal Elizabethan poet, courtier and soldier, Sir Philip Sidney.

xreal_1: Sir Philip Sidney "With How Sad Steps, O Moon, Thou Climb’st The Skies" With how sad steps, O moon, thou climb’st the skies; How silently, and with how wan a face. What, may it be that even in a heavenly place That busy archer his sharp arrows tries?

piyaphat_ford: Why does Sir Philip Sidney have a big booby ass like what

Mrtentewa: They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts. — Sir Philip Sidney

stickwomenn: sir philip sidney

BerownePats: 16th-Century Clapback: The Manipulation of Poetic Devices in Sir Philip Sidney's "An Apology for Poetry"

BerownePats: Tyrant or Temptress: Deciphering Meaning from Stella's Sole Reply in Sir Philip Sidney's "Fourth Song"

BerownePats: <span xml:lang="fr" lang="fr" dir="ltr">Writing as socio-political commitment. Sir Philip Sidney’s alternative</span>

BerownePats: The dazzling world of Sir Philip Sidney

BerownePats: The Influence of Plato on Sir Philip Sidney's Defense of Poesy

BerownePats: Sir Philip Sidney and the English Renaissance

LilyJaneMarple: From my college notes about the Elizabethan sonneteers: "Sir Philip Sidney was a hottie".

music_early: O you that hear this voice à 5 by William Byrd (c.1540-1623)

DavidCranmerUn1: became acquainted with Philip Sidney. In 1583, Philip Sidney married Frances, the 16-year-old daughter of Sir Francis Walsingham. Sidney played a brilliant part in the military/literary/courtly life common to the young nobles of the time. Both his family heritage and his

DavidCranmerUn1: England's biggest libraries. His scholarly status also took him into Elizabethan politics as an adviser and tutor to Elizabeth I and through relations with her ministers Francis Walsingham and William Cecil. He tutored and patronised Sir Philip Sidney; his uncle Robert Dudley,

CandleInWind2: My true love hath my heart, and I have his, By just exchange one for the other given: I hold his dear, and mine he cannot miss; There never was a bargain better driven. His heart in me keeps me and him in one … Sir Philip Sidney

Jaennecom: 2022-11-06 – Sonnet 1 by Sir Philip Sidney

Fixedthatforya: upennmanuscripts: upennmanuscripts: Sweet kiss, thy sweets I fain would sweetly indite, Which e'en of sweetness sweetest sweet'ner art. -Sir Philip Sidney, Astrophil and Stella - Sonnet 79 A sweet kiss between an eel and a fish on f. 184v of...

RichieHof: Sir Philip Sidney, by Unknown artist, oil on panel, circa 1576

SteveLeoGrace1: ....With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb'st the skies...... SIR PHILIP SIDNEY I'm afraid I can not go with you. Perhaps I'm more afraid that I chose not to climb this ladder with you. I love you more than anything, almost more than my own eroding sanity...

jntod: '[Nature's] world is brazen, the poets only deliver a golden' (Sir Philip Sidney)

nekomatapoetry: That is to say, the Renaissance poets played games with language. They did so from the baseline of the Petrarchan sonnet, and Sir Philip Sidney stands out because he both played and commented on the playing—imitated Petrarch and criticized Petrarch—while mastering the form.

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!

devoidofvalue: Consider the age of nostalgic chivalry in which Sir Philip Sidney lived and wrote, for example.

nekomatapoetry: That is to say, the Renaissance poets played games with language. They did so from the baseline of the Petrarchan sonnet, and Sir Philip Sidney stands out because he both played and commented on the playing—imitated Petrarch and criticized Petrarch—while mastering the form

FolgerLibrary: Beloved scholar Katherine Duncan-Jones died last week. Duncan-Jones, the author of acclaimed biographies of Shakespeare and Sir Philip Sidney, gave our 2002 Shakespeare's Birthday Lecture. Listen to our 2015 interview with her about portraits of the Bard:

NathanFrancis__: “Biting my truant pen, beating myself for spite: "Fool!" said my muse to me, "look in thy heart, and write.” Poems:

musicrecbot: Take a listen to: Psalm 23 by Sir Philip Sidney

CornelKakrabah: Today in 1586 Sir Philip Sidney died from a wound received while fighting beside Dutch reformers. He had loaned his armour to a soldier without any. Tradition has it that, aflame with thirst from bleeding, he nonetheless gave his last water to a dying soldier on the battlefield.

TudorHistory: Today in Tudor History: 17 October 1586 - Sir Philip Sidney died in Arnhem, Netherlands, 25 days after being shot in the leg at the Battle of Zutphen.

YEOLW0N: They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts. Sir Philip Sidney

worldoftelly: I’m having a flashback to one of Katherine Duncan-Jones’s lectures on Sir Philip Sidney. She was impressive, lucid and engaging. RIP.

ajayshukla2020: Today the first sonnet of Sir Philip Sidney ‘s sonnet sequence “Astrophel and Stella”was discussed in MA first semester class . Explained few points on Smart board

blown_through: I had a dream that my high school gf was Sir Philip Sidney in all but face and that I had to reenact the Pyrocles Amazonian woman crossdressing plot from Sidney's Arcadia to woo her, and as she was showing me around a collection of neoclassical architectural models I noticed a

Book_Addict: Happy birthday to English writer Fulke Greville (October 3, 1554), author of “Life of the Renowned Sir Philip Sidney” (1652) et al.

timisanni: "Of all writers under the sun, the poet is the least liar; and though he would, as a poet, can scarcely be a liar [...] For the poet, he nothing affirmeth, and therefore never lieth." Sir Philip Sidney in "An Apology for Poetry"

ewinkler: 'Biting my truant pen, beating myself for spite, 'Fool,' said my Muse to me, 'look in thy heart, and write.' - Sir Philip Sidney

HistoryOfNL: The Fatal Wounding of Sir Philip Sidney, by Benjamin West (painted 1806).

nekomatapoetry: Astrophel and Stella, an Elizabethan sonnet sequence of 108 sonnets, interspersed with 11 songs, by Sir Philip Sidney, written in 1582 and published posthumously in 1591. The work is often considered the finest Elizabethan sonnet cycle after William Shakespeare's sonnets.

nekomatapoetry: My lute, within thyself thy tunes enclose by Sir Philip Sidney My lute, within thyself thy tunes enclose; Thy mistress' song is now a sorrow's cry;

nekomatapoetry: The Nightingale BY SIR PHILIP SIDNEY The nightingale, as soon as April bringeth Unto her rested sense a perfect waking, While late bare earth, proud of new clothing, springeth, Sings out her woes, a thorn her song-book making, And mournfully bewailing,

nekomatapoetry: Astrophil and Stella 90: Stella, think not that I by verse seek fame BY SIR PHILIP SIDNEY Stella, think not that I by verse seek fame, Who seek, who hope, who love, who live but thee; Thine eyes my pride, thy lips my history; If thou praise not, all other praise is shame.

ahmedraoaf8: Yes school. “A mark of good literature is that it satisfies the moral sense.” — Aristotle “The very purpose of literature is the winning of the mind from wickedness to virtue.” — Sir Philip Sidney

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!

justababelfish: once again thinking about her (a t-shirt that says "sidney fan" but with accompanying doodles that make it unclear if it is referring to sidney crosby, professional hockey player, or sir philip sidney (1554-1586) author of the countess of pembroke's arcadia)

burgonsoc: The curious appendage on the left shoulder is not a money bag for legal fees as is often thought, but a remnant of the ancient mourning hood A clearer view of the hood can be seen in a 1587 print of the funeral of Sir Philip Sidney

antiquebooksden: ENGLISH ESSAYS, FROM SIR PHILIP SIDNEY TO MACAULAY VOLUME 27, HARVARD CLASSICS by PHILIP SIDNEY, LORD MACAULAY EDITED BY CHARLES W. ELIOT, LL.D

SallyBadham: These images from the Lant roll (on which I am currently working) recording Sir Philip Sidney's procession prior to funeral in on 16 February 1586/7 at Old St Paul’s Cathedral have an especial resonance just now. Obs they did not have gun carriages in those days.

lklutzke: “Either I will find a way, or I will make one.” —Sir Philip Sidney

TodaysComments: “Either I will find a way, or I will make one.” —Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586) poet, soldier

Ablebodied777: “Either I will find a way, or I will make one.” Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586) poet, soldier

RealDealTycoon: “Either I will find a way, or I will make one.” —Sir Philip Sidney

imcozy: “Either I will find a way, or I will make one.” —Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586) poet, soldier

amari_ms: “Either I will find a way, or I will make one.” - Sir Philip Sidney POET, SOLDIER

OrganicPeoplePR: SIR PHILIP SIDNEY AUSTRALIA GOD. Elizabethan Poet, Courtier Jesus. Arnhem, Netherlands. U.K. (November 29th, 1554- October 17th, 1586.)

Jeremy_boypoet: Sonnet September: Loving in truth by Sir Philip Sidney

OrganicPeoplePR: SIR PHILIP SIDNEY ELIZABETHAN Poet, Courtier. Penhurst, United Kingdom. Arnhem, Netherlands. Holy Bible. (November 29th, 1554- October 17th, 1586.)

gloria_withalm: Already before meeting her, Diana knows, of course, “The countess was the foremost woman of letters in the country, and Sir Philip Sidney’s sister.” [SON ch16] — When Diana receives Mary’s letter with an additional slip of paper with verses, and Matthew recognizes the content,

ProfShakespeare: How Sir Philip Sidney and his sister Mary Sidney tried to “lyrically and fully fuse the Reformation with the Renaissance”:

BotanicalShax: It had a profound effect on Elizabethan policy & poets. QEI's spymaster Sir Francis Walsingham & courtier/poet Philip Sidney were there; Marlowe wrote the play Massacre at Paris. (Shax ref. the day only 2x, odd references to summer flies & pigs.) *Painting by François Dubois

RandomQ85433955: They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts. ~ Sir Philip Sidney

poemtoday: Elizabethan poetry from Thomas Campion and Sir Philip Sidney ....

EBloodaxe19: Stella Stella was derived from stella, the Latin word for "star." It was coined by Sir Philip Sidney in 1590 for the protagonist of his poem collection Astrophel and Stella. The title literally means "the star lover and his star," but unlike Stella, Astrophel did not catch on.

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!

smalljones: Sir Philip Sidney: With How Sad Steps Do they call virtue there ungratefulness?

TheTLS: 'Scribe 5’s “English” section … is a wonderful collection of little-known pieces, many of which relate to important figures of the Elizabethan and Jacobean court, including Philip Sidney, Sir Francis Walsingham, Thomas Sackville.'

sympatheticopp: english civil war era has some great love stories there's sir philip sidney & penelope rich there's dorothea osbourne & william temple there's charles blount baron of mountjoy & penelope rich

oshawols: sir philip sidney writing astrophil and stella's sonnets

Eric_Racher: Sir Philip Sidney. Astrophil and Stella.



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Poem of the day

Emily Dickinson Poem
No Passenger was known to flee'
 by Emily Dickinson

1406

No Passenger was known to flee-
That lodged a night in memory-
That wily-subterranean Inn
Contrives that none go out again-


...

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