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tacobender29: They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts. Sir Philip Sidney

gloriousjune: ㅤ “They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts.” - Sir Philip Sidney ㅤ

CityLrc: They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts. --Sir Philip Sidney

quotio: They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts. ~Sir Philip Sidney

cameyrick1: OTD 16 February 1587 The burial of Sir Philip Sidney in the Lady Chapel at St Paul's Cathedral. Possibly the most elaborate funeral of a private individual until that of Sir Winston Churchill in 1965.

mownten: Sir Philip Sidney, in England’s first Neoclassical literary treatise, The Defence of Poesie (written c. 1578–83, published 1595), candidly admitted that “the old song [i.e., ballad] of Percy and Douglas” would move his heart “more than with a trumpet,”

burgonsoc: The curious appendage on the left shoulder is not a money bag for legal fees, but a remnant of the old mourning hood. A clearer view of the hood can be seen in a 1587 print of the funeral of Sir Philip Sidney

BRITANNIAREGULA: "Who will in fairest book of Nature know How Virtue may best lodged in beauty be, Let him but learn of Love to read in thee, Stella, those fair lines, which true goodness show. There shall he find all vices overthrow," - Sir Philip Sidney "Astrophil and Stella" (1591)

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!

Shakespeare: I have never looked down upon a romance author except for Sir Philip Sidney, and that was for other reasons.

casisads: Sir Philip Sidney— “My true love hath my heart, and I have his”

Sam_Mena_: The wisest scholar of the wight most wise By Phoebus’ doom, with sugared sentence says That Virtue, if it once met with our eyes, Strange flames of love it in our souls would raise; (Sir Philip Sidney, Astrophil & Stella) 1 of 4

Sam_Mena_: But, for that man with pain this truth descries, While he each thing in sense’s balance weighs, And so nor will nor can behold those skies Which inward sun to heroic mind displays, (Sir Philip Sidney, Astrophil & Stella) 2 of 4

Sam_Mena_: Virtue of late, with virtuous care to stir Love of herself, takes Stella’s shape, that she To mortal eyes might sweetly shine in her. (Sir Philip Sidney, Astrophil & Stella) 3 of 4

Sam_Mena_: It is most true, for since I her did see, Virtue’s great beauty in that face I prove, And find th’effect, for I do burn in love. (Sir Philip Sidney, Astrophil and Stella 25: The wisest scholar of the wight most wise ) 4 of 4

ThomasH83965694: You really should read more Sir Philip Sidney.

alacrates: I'm not a mason, but I'll learn from their memory techniques if they're sharing, well known for memorizing speeches & ceremony... Their techniques may actually trace back to Giordano Bruno, through Alexander Dickson, a Scottish writer, both in Sir Philip Sidney's London circle

OrtizKicks: My father in-law Sidney admired the home run king Hank Aaron so much growing up in Iowa, he named my brother in-law Aaron. Hank Aaron, from Mobile, Alabama, touched them all, and I’m not just talking about the bases. What a sad day. RIP, sir.

soundwipe13: 3 hours into writing a close reading paper, and I must say I've never hated breasts, the word "wanton", and Sir Philip Sidney as much as I do in this very moment

MasterInACave: "The ingredients of health and long life, are great temperance, open air, easy labor, and little care" Sir Philip Sidney

noodleboops: Has anyone tried to apply the 'Sir Philip Sidney' model of animal signalling to Gosplan? Could be interesting.

moveincircles: When Sir Philip Sidney write in 1595 that poetry should ‘teach and delight’ I don’t think this is what he had in mind

RobertHWoodman: No sword bites so fiercely as an evil tongue. ~Sir Philip Sidney

markhaber713: This is wonderful. A gorgeous, hybrid work (Memoir? Lit Crit? Biography?) that looks at Sir Philip Sidney's 16th century pastoral romance ARCADIA. It's so much more though. A love letter to words, imagination & history. Coming in April.

DamnedDane: Reading Sir Philip Sidney's 'Astrophil and Stella'. Never read it before! I may be wrong, but I believe it was the first 'sonnet cycle' written in English and was a huge influence on Shakespeare's 154. I'm bookmarking my favourites to read on my YouTube page in the future.

namratazakaria: “Fool, said my Muse to me, Look in thy heart and write.” - Sir Philip Sidney

H_Mayer777: “A brave captain is as a root, out of which, as branches, the courage of his soldiers doth spring.” -Sir Philip Sidney

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!

samuelpepys: Here was mighty good discourse: and among other things my Lord Crew did turn to a place in the Life of Sir Philip Sidney, wrote by Sir Fulke Greville, which do foretell the present condition of this nation, in relation to the Dutch, to the very degree of a prophecy.

MasterInACave: "The ingredients of health and long life, are great temperance, open air, easy labor, and little care" Sir Philip Sidney

No_way_but_this: Astrophil and Stella 1: Loving in truth, and fain in verse my love to show BY SIR PHILIP SIDNEY Loving in truth, and fain in verse my love to show, That she, dear she, might take some pleasure of my pain, Pleasure might cause her read, reading might make her know,

IncSerenily: “The ingredients of health and long life are great temperance, open air, easy labor, and little care.” ― Sir Philip Sidney

Ilovemymom1488: The Historian . . . loden with old Mouse-eaten records, authorising himself . . . upon the histories, whose greatest authorities are built upon the notable foundation of Heare-say’. - Sir Philip Sidney (1554–1586)

JoeJaco01221181: “The ingredients of health and long life are great temperance, open air, easy labor, and little care.” ― Sir Philip Sidney

HarryWatson63: Loving in truth - Sir Philip Sidney Loving in truth, and fain in verse my love to show, That she, dear she, might take some pleasure of my pain,— Pleasure might cause her read, reading might make her know, Knowledge might pity win, and pity grace obtain .....

SheTheSupreme: Sir Philip Sidney was a statesman and a poet, but in spite of his success in life, he remained humble. He is reported to have said on seeing a criminal being taken to the gallows the famous sentence which Sri Aurobindo quotes

SheTheSupreme: Sir Philip Sidney said of the criminal led out to be hanged, “There, but for the grace of God, goes Sir Philip Sidney”. Wiser, had he said, “There, by the grace of God, goes Sir Philip Sidney”. Sri Aurobindo   I have not understood the meaning of this Aphorism.

electrohoarder: - Sir Philip Sidney, An Apology for Poetry

Aeternus_priaro: Sir Philip Sidney>Shakespeare

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!

DelicieusAurore: Unknown Artist, Man in Mourning for Sir Philip Sidney, c. 1587.

Mery_9999: Not at first sight, nor with a dribbed shot love gave the wound which while I breath will bleed .. by Sir Philip sidney kind of an amusing poem, worth reading it.

Tamizdata: 1554 — Sir Philip Sidney, British poet, statesman, born, Penshurst, Kent. 

TudorHistory: Today in Tudor History: 30 November 1554 - Philip Sidney was born to Sir Henry Sidney and Mary Dudley (sister of Robert Dudley) at Penshurst Place.

RoyalUniverse: Sir Philip Sidney, poet and courtier to Elizabeth I, was born on 30 November 1554

HBurpday: November 30 Today is the anniversary of the birth of Philip Sidney (1554) Jonathan Swift (1667) Oliver Winchester (1810) Mark Twain (1835) Sir Winston Churchill (1874) Lucy Maud Montgomery (1874) Efrem Zimbalist Jr (1918) Virginia Mayo (1920) 1/2

InterestingLit: Sir Philip Sidney was born on this day in 1554. If you've never read the sonnets of this Elizabethan Renaissance man, here's our selection of his best poems:

lucubrations: POTD 11/30 My True Love Hath My Heart by Sir Philip Sidney

CelebBirthdayUK: November 30 Today is the anniversary of the birth of Philip Sidney Jonathan Swift Oliver Winchester Mark Twain Sir Winston Churchill Lucy Maud Montgomery Efrem Zimbalist Jr Virginia Mayo 1/2

ShrewsburyDrama: Happy 466th Birthday to our esteemed next-door-neighbour, Sir Philip Sidney - poet, soldier, scholar, Salopian! "Either I will find a way - or make one."

akritiarora07: In Literature - In Homer's Odyssey, the number of suitors coveting Penelope, wife of Odysseus are 108 There are 108 love sonnets in Astrophil and Stella, the first English sonnet sequence by Sir Philip Sidney. There are 108 lines in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven".

fagliaccci: Sir Philip Sidney

kurtulussmelih: Petrarch, Sir Philip Sidney, Sir Walter Raleigh, Edmund Spenser and Earl of Surrey were all slayed by the first verse of the song. Marina - Man's World (Official Video)

perihansimav: Sonnet 5 from Astrophil and Stella BY SIR PHILIP SIDNEY It is most true, that eyes are formed to serve  The inward light; and that the heavenly part  Ought to be king, from whose rules who do swerve,  Rebels to Nature, strive for their own smart.

TheLightOfSmith: To make myself believe that all is well, While with a feeling skill i paint my hell. ‘ Sir Philip Sidney ‘

faboy14438099: [Number Fact]: 108 - there number of love sonnets in Astrophil and Stella, the first English sonnet sequence by Sir Philip Sidney

LeoWinkley: Flags at half mast as acts of Remembrance are held in each house and at the Sir Philip Sidney War Memorial. Remembering the 580 Salopian pupils and staff, and all those who gave their lives in conflict. ‘We will remember them’.

_qnncssrb: “Either I will find a way or I will make one.” -Sir Philip Sidney

GCoatalen: Sir Philip Sidney

IzzyLiberty: class: *talks about love sonnets* me: wait wtf did he just say he's pregnant with words but can't push enough to birth them (Sir Philip Sidney, Astrophil to Stella, Sonnet 1, line 12)

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!

NorthEnglishes: What are your favourite moon references in poetry and literature, and how will they have to be revised in the light of this new discovery? We'll start with some Sir Philip Sidney: With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb'st the skies! How silently, and with how [wet] a face!

SarahMEsmael: " It is the nature of the strong heart, that like the palm tree it strives ever upwards when it is most burdened." --- Sir Philip Sidney

ArmandoMandap: Quote of the Day “No sword bites so fiercly as an evil tongue.” Sir Philip Sidney » English poet (1554-1586)

tweetheart4711: Mine are probably a little old for me: Francois Villon, Sir Philip Sidney and the Pharoah Akhenaten. A bad boy, a good boy and a rockin' royal radical.

robert_stagg: “To introduce a study of Sidney there could be no better epigraph than Pico’s joyful phrase about man: ‘Who would not admire this our chameleon?’” — introduction to Dorothy Connell’s ‘Sir Philip Sidney: The Maker’s Mind’ (1977)

MasterInACave: "The ingredients of health and long life, are great temperance, open air, easy labor, and little care" Sir Philip Sidney

chrisriddell50: The Bargain by Sir Philip Sidney.

poob2016: It's always pained me that 400 or so years prevent me from ever running into Kit Marlowe. I've ALWAYS had a thing for Sir Philip Sidney which has never abated. If his mum could be thrown in too, that'd be great.But would settle for a night of chat with some wine & Amelia Lanyer!

fancy62629: No sword bites so fiercly as an evil tongue. -Sir Philip Sidney

RobertHWoodman: No sword bites so fiercely as an evil tongue. ~Sir Philip Sidney

MitfordUv: On this day 1586 Death of Sir Philip Sidney English poet, MP for Shrewsbury, courtier, scholar & soldier who died in battle. One of the most prominent figures of the Elizabethan age. His works include Astrophel & Stella, The Defence of Poesy, & The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia.

EnglishTreasure: OTD 17th Oct 1586, the poet, courtier & soldier, Sir Philip Sidney, died at the age of 31. One of the most prominent figures of the Elizabethan age, he spent a lot of time abroad on diplomatic missions and was in Paris when the 'St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre' began.

TudorHistory: Today in Tudor History: 17 October 1586 - Sir Philip Sidney died in Arnhem, Netherlands, 25 days after being shot in the leg at the Battle of Zutphen.

Margaritafrd: INTELLIGENTS people enjoy LONELINESS, others fill it with anyone. The true LONELINESS does not consist in being ALONE, consist in being EMPTY. Those who are accompanied by NOBLE FEELINGS are never ALONE. (Sir Philip Sidney)

JMWSPT: "the evil luck to read this ink-wasting toy of mine." -Sir Philip Sidney

philiplaver: "Come Sleep! O Sleep, the certain knot of peace, The baiting-place of wit, the balm of woe, The poor man's wealth, the prisoner's release, The indifferent judge between the high and low." Couldnt have put it better myself Sir Philip Sidney! Feeling tired today

KaarlLopez: He explores love and jealousy, duty and revenge, power politics, and many other ideas. This was the most splendid age in the history of English literature, during which such writers as Sir Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, R. Hooker, C. Marlowe, and William Shakespeare flourished.

MasterInACave: "The ingredients of health and long life, are great temperance, open air, easy labor, and little care" Sir Philip Sidney

JoseAngelGLanda: Shakespeare's Muse of Fire - Sir Philip Sidney

Surazeus: Someday I will visit quaint Cambridge town and stand on wide lush shore of the Charles River where my ancestor Anne Bradstreet first lived, and then sail east to Isle of Avalon where her cousin Sir Philip Sidney sang Astrophel and Stella for his bride Frances.

thomas_hoak: Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586)

PeppyScott: Pleased to have made a poetry prize shortlist as I rarely submit anything. And it's a nice local one too - shame no live readings this year though... Shortlisted poems can be read here -

Book_Addict: Happy birthday to English writer Fulke Greville (October 3, 1554), author of “Life of the Renowned Sir Philip Sidney” (1652) et al.

Snowmoth1: Sir Philip Sidney, ‘With how sad steps, O moon, thou climb’st the skies’. With how sad steps, O moon, thou climb’st the skies; How silently, and with how wan a face. What, may it be that even in heavenly place That busy archer his sharp arrows tries?

MasterInACave: "The ingredients of health and long life, are great temperance, open air, easy labor, and little care" Sir Philip Sidney

SchoolDepotCoUk: Sidney, Sir Philip

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!

abasu_: The young Apu reading about Sir Philip Sidney's heroism and death in the battle of Zutphen is just mesmerizing. Most might know Pather Panchali or The Song of the Road through Ray's epic trilogy, but Bibhutibhusan Bandopadhyay's novel just sparkles with moments like these.

Faust89823700: Sir Philip Sidney - A Ditty My true-love hath my heart, and I have his, By just exchange one to the other given: I hold his dear, and mine he cannot miss, There never was a better bargain driven: My true-love hath my heart, and I have his.

Shakespeare: Sometimes I ask myself, "What would Sir Philip Sidney do?" because it's probably a bad idea.

DelphicSapient: PPSC, FPSC LECTURESHIP | English | Lecture 14. Sir Philip Sidney + Vocab...

MosPostcards: Famous People Postcard - Sir Philip Sidney - English Poet RS22794

JMWSPT: Friends, this invites a witty response, but I am about to settle in to read Sir Philip Sidney, and so I invite you to furnish the silencing reply Pete so obviously deserves.

ARTPOPAlien_: I'm studying a subject called Criticism and it's all about Aristotle, Plato, Sir Philip Sidney etc. and their views about literature and poetry. It's fun to read but hard to memorize. I get the gist of the whole thing, but I'm afraid I can't put it into words in my exam paper.

orapronobisdeum: ... and now like slave-born Muscovite I call it praise to suffer tyranny; And now employ the remnant of my wit To make myself believe that all is well, While with a feeling skill I paint my hell. - Sir Philip Sidney

TWPoetryFest: Still time to submit to the Sir Philip Sidney poetry competition - limerick section too! The festival's cancelled this year But still there's good reason to cheer If you're a world beater In rhyming and metre Please send in your poems - details here -

bycariann: Reading Sir Philip Sidney’s, The Defense of Poesy, and this man is out here throwing mad shade on moral philosophers and historians 16th century style and I love it

welfordwrites: Sad Steps, a poem by Philip Larkin. Inspired by a 16th century poem by Sir Philip Sidney, Larkin comes to very different conclusions. Click the link!



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Poem of the day

Charles Baudelaire Poem
Le Voyage
 by Charles Baudelaire

A Maxime Du Camp
I

Pour l'enfant, amoureux de cartes et d'estampes,
L'univers est égal à son vaste appétit.
Ah! que le monde est grand à la clarté des lampes!
Aux yeux du souvenir que le monde est petit!

...

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