Comments about Siegfried Sassoon

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war_poets: 8 December 1915 Siegfried Sassoon goes riding ‘& made hunting noises & was quite happy with the corky little animal under one going so nicely. Saw no one but a few Bengal Lancers, very fine fellars, well mounted.’

sammycopley1: thinking of this Siegfried Sassoon poem today for no particular topical reason

JackPolakoff: For they know that you've fought for your country, And no one will worry a bit. Siegfried Sassoon

war_poets: 7 December 1915 Siegfried Sassoon writes ‘here there are flocks of starlings & men ploughing with gray horses, and the roads wind away to a horizon that is not bounded by a line of armies entrenched.’

war_poets: 6 December 1917 Siegfried Sassoon notes an early morning air raid.

war_poets: 6 December 1917 Wilfred Owen writes to Siegfried Sassoon ‘I shall continue to poop off heavy stuff at you, till you get my range at Scarborough, and so silence me, for the time. This ‘Wild with all Regrets’ was begun & ended two days ago, at one gasp.'

war_poets: 6 December 1915 Siegfried Sassoon arrives in Montague ‘There have been no troops here before (except one troop of Bengal Lancers) & the rustic inhabitants don’t seem overjoyed at seeing us.’

tonytaxfraud: this isnt like the augustus thing this has nothing to do with new works i just really like siegfried sassoon

books_tc: Wilfred Owen 1920 edition of Poems published thanks to Siegfried Sassoon and Edith Sitwell

war_poets: 5 December 1917 On leave, Siegfried Sassoon returns to London and sees J.M. Barrie’s play Dear Brutus.

war_poets: 5 December 1915 Siegfried Sassoon writes of an early morning walk ‘And a troop of mules clatters along to meet me, at their morning exercise, turbaned Indians and whistling T. Atkins leading them.'

war_poets: 4 December 1916 Siegfried Sassoon arrives at Litherland Army Camp in Liverpool

Jeinaaa_: oh sht it was a line in Siegfried Sassoon's poem wtf why would my teacher end it with BALLS this is messed up

war_poets: 3 December 1915 Siegfried Sassoon is en route to Bourecq ‘We met an infantry Brigade … Men marching by, four after four, hideous, brutal faces, sullen wretched.’

war_poets: 2 December 1916 Siegfried Sassoon reports to the Royal Welch depot at Litherland. His poem ‘The Poet as Hero’ appears today in the Cambridge Magazine.

war_poets: 2 December 1915 Siegfried Sassoon writes ‘Saw a heron, which sailed slowly away across the misty flats of ploughed land; gray, still evening, gleaming dykes, willows & poplars; a few lights here & there as we rode home & flicker of star shells in the sky beyond Bethune.’

jesuscrisis: 5 of 5 stars to Counter-Attack and Other Poems by Siegfried Sassoon

lighghghght: On his 9th birthday, Siegfried Sassoon’s mother gave him a copy of Coleridge’s lectures on Shakespeare, which young Sassoon took to mean that she wanted him to be a poet.

RaviButalia: "When all is said and done, leading a good life is better than keeping a good diary." Siegfried Sassoon

EmilyLayne13: Just watched an excellent episode of Babylon 5, very anti war, it reminded me of one of my favourite poems by Siegfried Sassoon,

war_poets: 30 November 1915 Siegfried Sassoon leaves Le Hamel for Gonneheur 'Men in large warm barn. Four big bedrooms for us, & a large mess room - a sort of palace compared with Le Hamel.'

AustBookReview: 'No critic would wish a film director to stay forever on his home turf, but Benediction nonetheless made me pine for those lovingly incandescent Davies films about his childhood and youth ...' Ian Britain on 'Benediction'

war_poets: 29 November 1915 Siegfried Sassoon writes ‘Awful mud up in the trenches. Tried to dig till 7.30, & came home soaked. Home 9.45. A shocking night for the men, whose billets are wretched.’

war_poets: 29 November 1917 Siegfried Sassoon goes on leave

war_poets: 28 November 1915 Siegfried Sassoon and Robert Graves first meet near Béthune ‘Walked into Bethune for tea with R.G. a young poet, captain in 3rd battalion & very much disliked. An interesting creature overstrung & self-conscious, a defier of convention.’

theclientele: Backed on 7” by the first song we worked on, setting the words of a late Siegfried Sassoon poem to music. First, non-album version here:

war_poets: 27 November 1917 Wilfred Owen writes to Siegfried Sassoon ‘What sport for my imagination is the idea of your Meeting with R. Nichols.—He is so self-concerned & vaniteux in his verse that I thought he must efface himself in a room: even as you who write so acid are so—unsoured'

ChikuChill: In me the tiger sniffs the rose. - Siegfried Sassoon

war_poets: 27 November 1915 Siegfried Sassoon writes ‘Up behind the trenches the frost-bound morasses & ditches & old earthworks in the moonlight with dusky figures filing across the open, hobbling to avoid slipping, inhuman forms going to & from inhuman tasks.’

CollettWriter: A mini Friday evening chart of my three favourite political poems / poems about class, starting with no. 3 'The Case for the Miners' by Siegfried Sassoon 'And that's the reason why I shout and splutter...'

SSassoonFlwship: OTD 1925, ‘Herbert E Palmer, has dedicated his new poems (Songs of Salvation, Sin, and Satire) ‘to the Ghosts of John Masefield and Siegfried Sassoon’. He ‘intends no offence’. I doubt he knows what he intends! He is almost a fine poet and has flashes of real inspiration.’

waterloobot: p.s. wilfred owen to siegfried sassoon—1917: And you have fixed my Life—however short. You did not light me: I was always a mad comet; but you have fixed me. 9/25/20 3:21 AM

_yunghoney: bought Siegfried Sassoon’s autobiographical work and it’s so boring his poetry rlly catfished me

war_poets: 24 November 1915 Siegfried Sassoon writes ‘Paraded with kit at 2.30 a.m. & went to station. Train started at 5.30!!! Arrived Bethune 10.15’

wheniwasgreg: Siegfried Sassoon and Winston Churchill.

LacusSilvarum: Stephen Tennant and Siegfried Sassoon, c. 1928

OTDCanMilHis: I died in hell -- (They called it Passchendaele). My wound was slight, And I was hobbling back; and then a shell Burst slick upon the duck-boards: so I fell Into the bottomless mud, and lost the light. Siegfried Sassoon

sergiomrvieira: Shoulder to aching shoulder, side by side, They trudged away from life's broad wealds of light. — Siegfried Sassoon, 1886-1967

war_poets: 19 November 1915 Siegfried Sassoon writes ‘went into Le Touquet on bike . . . Bike bust so drove back in cab.’

elementary_peng: Aftermath by Siegfried Sassoon

war_poets: 18 November 1915 Siegfried Sassoon arrives at base camp in Etaples ‘320 officers just got there, waiting to be posted.’

fuwolff: Terence Davies' new film is a biopic of Siegfried Sassoon!?!?!?!?

tnyfrontrow: Terence Davies. Am jumping out of my skin with impatience to see Benediction, whenever it gets here (not in NYFF); for now, exulting in this new interview-moment with him, after my own heart: "Is cinema closer to poetry or prose?" "It’s closest to music."

Oldmankrondas: Floored by Davies' devastating 'Benediction'. Impeccably cast; the bitter brittleness of Peter Capaldi as the elder and the aching sadness of Jack Lowden as the younger Sassoon compliment each other beautifully. Lowden and Tennyson's chemistry is electric as Siegfried and Wilfred

war_poets: 17 November 1915 Siegfried Sassoon sails from Folkestone ‘in bright moonlight’ arriving in Calais at 9.30.

war_poets: 17 November 1916 Siegfried Sassoon attends his third medical board since his summer fever and lung infection and is pronounced fit to return to duty – with leave first.

CriterionDaily: And still they come and go: and this is all I know— That from the gloom I watch an endless picture-show ... Terence Davies reads Siegfried Sassoon’s 1919 poem “Picture-Show”

litcharts: New guide! The Rear-Guard by Siegfried Sassoon

TheTLS: 'The large, silent gentleman with the prominent moustache encountered by Sassoon does not remotely resemble the rather short, bespectacled and talkative gentleman who had written the Raffles stories.'

peejay_adams: "The Prince of Darkness to the Cenotaph Bowed. As he walked away I heard him laugh." - Siegfried Sassoon.

aflashbak: Siegfried Sassoon on the 1917 WWI battle in Arras. The General ‘Good-morning; good-morning!’ the General said When we met him last week on our way to the line. Now the soldiers he smiled at are most of ’em dead, And we’re cursing his staff for incompetent swine.

_ellaellaella_: I just said “love this war poet called siegfried sassoon” and my friend replies “oh the hair guy?

BBCRadio4: The friendship of Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon, a moving drama first broadcast in 1983.

harrydempsey88: My favourite Poem from WW1 by Siegfried Sassoon.

BrunoBrussels: "Who will remember, passing through this Gate, the unheroic dead who fed the guns? Who shall absolve the foulness of their fate,- Those doomed, conscripted, unvictorious ones?" Siegfried Sassoon, On Passing The New Menin Gate

DrRoundglasses: On Remembrance Sunday remember wave of revolutions, sailors & soldiers mutinies, mass working class action, that ended WW1, Siegfried Sassoon who hurled his medals into the River Mersey, Sylvia Pankhurst who organised anti-war Christmas children's parties, conscientious objectors

3salmon: 3/ I suffered anguish that he’s never guessed. Once I came home on leave: and then went west… What greater glory could a man desire? Siegfried Sassoon

Otto_English: The two most famous poets of WW1 Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen were both gay. Sassoon won the MC. So much for wokeness

MarkBartlam: I live in a village in Leicestershire. Our one claim to fame: Siegfried Sassoon based part of his book ‘Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man’ on his visits to our village in 1913-14. The hunt based in the village, which Sassoon called the ‘Packlestone Hunt’, closed for good in 2020.

WasteNotTrading: Check out Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man by Siegfried Sassoon 1929 first edition 8th print

PoemsOnTheTube: Poem of the Week: The General by Siegfried Sassoon

OhMyNottz: Not About Heroes Adapted from Siegfried Sassoon's work by Stephen MacDonald BBC

writersblocknot: Not About Heroes Adapted from Siegfried Sassoon's work by Stephen MacDonald BBC

hothousenttm: Not About Heroes Adapted from Siegfried Sassoon's work by Stephen MacDonald BBC

SligoJ: Men fought like brutes, and hideous things were done And you have nourished hatred, harsh and blind But in that Golgotha perhaps you’ll find The mothers of the men who killed your son” Siegfried Sassoon

JaneSturgeon3: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry Rewind – In Remembrance – The War Poets – Siegfried Loraine Sassoon CBE, MC by Sally Cronin

lancaster_words: Saturday starts with Siegfried Sassoon's In Me, Past, Present, Future Meet.

mitchelltorok: 3/3 Do they matter-those dreams in the pit? You can drink and forget and be glad, And people won't say that you’re mad; For they know that you've fought for your country, And no one will worry a bit. Siegfried Sassoon

waterloobot: p.s. wilfred owen to siegfried sassoon—1917: And you have fixed my Life—however short. You did not light me: I was always a mad comet; but you have fixed me. 9/25/20 3:21 AM

JasonBKyle2: A clip from the 1997 adaptation of Pat Barker's WW1 novel Regeneration. Here Siegfried Sassoon meets with Wilfrid Owen at Craiglockhart:

TheTLS: 'The large, silent gentleman with the prominent moustache encountered by Sassoon does not remotely resemble the rather short, bespectacled and talkative gentleman who had written the Raffles stories.'

barryjbutler: Soldiers who died in the two world wars did not sacrifice themselves for King & country. They were, in truth, sacrificed. Siegfried Sassoon was aware of the injustice. We should be more careful with language.

NunavutBirder: Attack - Siegfried Sassoon

JanSikes3: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry Rewind – In Remembrance – The War Poets – Siegfried Loraine Sassoon CBE, MC by Sally Cronin

norfolkdarlo: Discovering Siegfried Sassoon was a key moment in my youth. On this day when I remember my father who survived Burma- Sassoon’s verse is still so powerful. A short poem here. “A Mystic As Soldier" by Siegfried Sassoon

EmmaMillsLondon: Everyone Sang by Siegfried Sassoon | Poetry Foundation

dlfinnauthor: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry Rewind – In Remembrance – The War Poets – Siegfried Loraine Sassoon CBE, MC by Sally Cronin

BetteAStevens: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry Rewind – In Remembrance – The War Poets – Siegfried Loraine Sassoon CBE, MC by Sally Cronin

harmony_kent: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry Rewind – In Remembrance – The War Poets – Siegfried Loraine Sassoon CBE, MC by Sally Cronin

TheNWMagpie: Men who went out to battle, grim and glad; Children, with eyes that hate you, broken and mad. --Siegfried Sassoon, "Survivors," 1917

jnewshamwriter: Siegfried Sassoon:

danbarker: An odd thread. Tweet 1: limits remembrance to working-class people. Tweet 3: memorialises them using a poem by famously upper class siegfried sassoon. I think that sadly sums up the care put into this message, about a topic that deserves not to be treated carelessly.

labyrinthman: "But death replied: 'I choose him.' So he went, And there was silence in the summer night; Silence and safety; and the veils of sleep. Then, far away, the thudding of the guns." from "The Death Bed" by Siegfried Sassoon, 1918

NinoushkaLondon: Siegfried Sassoon

BeingessnerN: On Remembrance Day, we read war poetry. E's favourite poet now: Siegfried Sassoon. "Pray you'll never know the hell where youth and laughter go."

marysmithwriter: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry Rewind – In Remembrance – The War Poets – Siegfried Loraine Sassoon CBE, MC by Sally Cronin

grendel1970: If I were fierce, and bald, and short of breath I'd live with scarlet Majors at the Base, And speed glum heroes up the line to death... ...And when the war is done and youth stone dead, I'd toddle safely home and die — in bed. Siegfried Sassoon

BeineckeLibrary: Dulce et decorum est in Poems / by Wilfred Owen ; with an introduction by Siegfried Sassoon. Published/Created:London : Chatto & Windus, 1920.

libcomorg: Siegfried Sassoon: I knew a simple soldier boy Who grinned at life in empty joy, Slept soundly through the lonesome dark, And whistled early with the lark.

jack_sommers: Twitter: Can someone help me find a source of this: I remember something about Siegfried Sassoon being asked what he wanted re remembrance of WW1 and replying: 'I want to drive down Oxford Street machine gunning people so they know how I feel.'

MDaviot: "Poor young chap," I'd say -- "I used to know his father well; Yes, we've lost heavily in this last scrap." And when the war is done and youth stone dead, I'd toddle safely home and die -- in bed. Siegfried Sassoon *photo: young German soldier, Battle of the Somme, 1916*

KTDigital: Have you forgotten yet?...Look up, and swear by the green of the spring that you’ll never forget. (Siegfried Sassoon, 1919).

cjlemire: Have you forgotten yet?... Look up, and swear by the green of the spring that you'll never forget. AFTERMATH by Siegfried Sassoon

war_poets: 11 November 1918 Siegfried Sassoon is walking near Cuddesdon in Oxfordshire ‘A jolly peal of bells was ringing from the village church & the villagers were hanging little flags out of their windows […] the war is ended.’

AyoCaesar: I don't think we're doing a great job at conveying the meaning of Armistice Day if posting an excerpt from a *Siegfried Sassoon poem* winds people up about the lack of patriotic reverence.

violetlightwave: “…And am no more the knight of dreams and show: For lust and senseless hatred make me glad, And my killed friends are with me where I go. Wound for red wound I burn to smite their wrongs; And there is absolution in my songs." - Siegfried Sassoon, 1916

theasraidance: 'Everyone's voice was suddenly lifted; And beauty came like the setting sun: My heart was shaken with tears; and horror Drifted away... O, but Everyone Was a bird; and the song was wordless; the singing will never be done.' ~From 'Everyone Sang' by Siegfried Sassoon

SarahFPoetry: Love letter from Wilfred Owen to Siegfried Sassoon, November 5th 1917 'I spun round you a satellite for a month, but I shall swing out soon, a dark star in the orbit where you will blaze'

abradacabla: This thread starts with this class-exclusionary garbage and ends with a poem by Siegfried Sassoon, a scion of a wealthy family, who suffered no less than any working class person during the war, in case you’re wondering how irony’s doing.



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Emily Dickinson Poem
Not Sickness stains the Brave
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1613

Not Sickness stains the Brave,
Nor any Dart,
Nor Doubt of Scene to come,
But an adjourning Heart-


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