Comments about Rupert Brooke

Click to write a comment about Rupert Brooke

malotruc: Rupert Brooke

BeArlNaticsOFC: A kiss makes the heart young again and wipes out the years. -Rupert Brooke Happy19thMonthsary LOUDRE

war_poets: 28 October 1914 Rupert Brooke writes ‘I hope you don’t think me very reactionary and callous for taking up this function of England. There shouldn’t be war–but what’s to be done, but fight Prussia? I’ve seen the half million refugees in the night outside Antwerp'

FitGirlMojo1: A book may be compared to your neighbor: if it be good, it cannot last too long; if bad, you cannot get rid of it too early. :- Rupert Brooke

HarryWatson63: Say, is there Beauty yet to find? And Certainty? and Quiet kind? Deep meadows yet, for to forget The lies, and truths, and pain? . . . oh! yet Stands the Church clock at ten to three? And is there honey still for tea? Rupert Brooke

Pletho1453: Rupert Brooke

hautepop: Lipstick-crimson virginia creeper outside Rupert Brooke’s former home, The Old Vicarage in Granchester, Cambridge.

HappyLDNpress: Rupert Brooke, however, was a poet with a very different understanding of the First World War.

LyndonMytton: Rupert Brooke {1887-1915} the great English poet who like so 'many beautiful souls' lost their lives in that 'desperate monstrousness - WW1 which left this country with 2,700,000 casualties and 800,000 casualties in WW2. Inconceivably lost and affected lives for Britain.

LyndonMytton: The poetic and gentle nature that oozes out of Rupert Brooke's eyes that must have been totally numbed by the barbarity he saw on those battlefields that took his 'gentle soul in 1915'. One could weep for weeks at the things he had to go through in one so gentle.

mikaela_LQ: A kiss makes the heart young again and wipes out the years. ~ Rupert Brooke CHEERS 24EVER LIZQUEN

HappyLDNpress: Rupert Brooke, however, was a poet with a very different understanding of the First World War.

teethandlungs: thinking about that one picture of rupert brooke (that looks incredibly like james wilby)

kaptimberwolves: The Soldier, by Rupert Brooke (edited) If I should die, think only this of me: That there’s some corner of a foreign field That is forever Canada. There shall be In that rich earth a richer dust concealed; A dust whom Canada bore, shaped, made aware...

JamesKerr125: By chance I was listening to Septimus Kelly's 'Memoriam to Rupert Brooke' this afternoon. - do listen

afshinrattansi: NEW: Serco CEO Rupert Soames reveals UK taxpayers pay his company £1.2bn a year. That's double the annual budget for the arts.

mickhumph: The Old Vicarage, Grantchester Apologies to Rupert Brooke The Romans were fond of their bees as they didn’t have sugar, or teas. So, at ten to three they had honey for tea with hot water and, sometime, cheese.

jc_parker96: Yeats dijo que Rupert Brooke era “the handsomest young man in England”.

atShoalstone: the dust of the dead gods, alone. — rupert brooke

Mitch_Rupert: Lydia Barbour wins the sixth game at love and Montoursville has a 4-2 lead in the first set on Bloomsburg’s Dana Lee and Brooke Keister

Mitch_Rupert: An amazing game between Bloomsburg and Montoursville which featured at least 10 rounds of deuce and went about 2-25 minutes finishes with Brooke Keister holding serve to give Bloom a 4-2 lead in the second set

Mitch_Rupert: Lydia Barbour and Rei Saar will get a chance to defend their district doubles title as the Montoursville duo closes out a 6-3, 6-4 win over Bloomsburg’s Dana Lee and Brooke Keister by winning the final four games of the second set

war_poets: 19 October 1916 Edward Thomas writes to Robert Frost about Rupert Brooke ‘I think he succeeded in being youthful and yet intelligible and interesting (not only pathologically) more than most poets since Shelley. But thought gave him (and me) indigestion.'

john_ritzema: (blame Rupert Brooke for being a subconscious earworm)

war_poets: 17 October 1914 Rupert Brooke writes 'I caught conjunctivitis, alias pink-eye, in some of the foul places we slept in: and my eyes have been swollen, red, unlovely, exuding thick plum-tree gum, and very painful. I hope they’re getting better’

pokercubster: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry – In Remembrance – The War Poets - Rupert Brooke

HowellWave: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry – In Remembrance – The War Poets - Rupert Brooke

Ellen_DuBois: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

JanSikes3: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry – In Remembrance – The War Poets - Rupert Brooke

marysmithwriter: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry – In Remembrance – The War Poets - Rupert Brooke

BetteAStevens: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry – In Remembrance – The War Poets - Rupert Brooke

SLMarchisello: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry – In Remembrance – The War Poets - Rupert Brooke

piketoni1: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry – In Remembrance – The War Poets - Rupert Brooke

RobertaEaton17: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry – In Remembrance – The War Poets - Rupert Brooke

EslarnerZeitung: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry – In Remembrance – The War Poets – Rupert Brooke

EslarnerZeitung: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry – In Remembrance – The War Poets - Rupert Brooke

MitfordUv: OUR GREAT WRITERS Rupert Brooke Born 03/08/1887 & died on April 23rd - St. George's Day 1915 (Shakespeare’s birthday) aged 27. He was admired for both his brains & his striking good looks. His wartime sonnets brought him immediate fame (also known for his romantic works) (Thread)

sgc58: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry – In Remembrance – The War Poets – Rupert Brooke

dlfinnauthor: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry – In Remembrance – The War Poets - Rupert Brooke

YouAreTheExpert: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry – In Remembrance – The War Poets - Rupert Brooke

jprapke: The Soldier by Rupert Brooke If I should die, think only this of me: That there’s some corner of a foreign field That is for ever England. There shall be In that rich earth a richer dust concealed; A dust whom England bore, sh…

welfordwrites: Cities, like cats, will reveal themselves at night. Rupert Brooke

war_poets: 13 October 1914 Rupert Brooke writes to Frances Cornford ‘I have to report that your sleeping-bag was heavily shelled & demolished by fire in Antwerp last week. Awfly sorry. We all pay our little bit, these days.’

atShoalstone: reading rupert brooke in sunshine.

nickfshort: Oh, poetry too. I unforgivably forgot Rupert Brooke, whose grave on Skyros I will one day visit.

war_poets: 8 October 1914 Rupert Brooke writes 'Rivers and seas of flame leaping up hundreds of feet, crowned by black smoke that covered the entire heavens. It lit up houses wrecked by shells, dead horses, demolished railway stations, engines that had been taken up with their lines'

ACarpenDigital: Poet Rupert Brooke gave this speech in Cambridge in 1910 on how a democracy should support the arts

war_poets: 7 October 1914 Rupert Brooke writes ‘There’s the excitement in the trenches–we weren’t attacked seriously in our part–with people losing their heads and fussing and snapping. It’s queer to see the people who do break under the strain of danger and responsibility.'

c_a_i_a_4: A kiss makes the heart young again and wipes out the years. -Rupert Brooke VLOGGER DIANAMACKEY

war_poets: 6 October 1914 Rupert Brooke writes ‘So we got out at Antwerp, and marched through the streets, and everyone cheered and flung themselves on us and gave us apples and chocolate and flags and kisses, and cried Vivent les Anglais and ‘Heep! Heep! Heep!’

LoveCarousel: The Great Lover by Rupert Brooke

war_poets: 5 October 1914 Rupert Brooke, newly arrived in France, writes ‘I had to imagine, supposing I was killed. There was nothing but a vague gesture of goodbye to you and my mother and a friend or two. I seemed so remote and barren and stupid. I seemed to have missed everything'

war_poets: 4 October 1914 Rupert Brooke writes ‘We were pulled out of bed at 5 a.m. on the Sunday, and told that we started at 9. We marched down to Dover, highly excited, only knowing that we were bound for Dunkirk, and supposing that we’d stay there quietly, training for a month.

matthewpoxon: Oooh duckie! Just off to post The Symposium and a photo of Rupert Brooke to all my faves.

AdenArabie: Rupert Brooke, The Soldier.

LoveCarousel: The Great Lover by Rupert Brooke

war_poets: 3 October 1914 Rupert Brooke writes ‘I’ve had such a busy week! I’ve been learning everything all at once, fighting all night, marching all day, drilling & God knows what. I’ve not had a minute to myself.

war_poets: 3 October 1916 Vera Brittain writes ' A mist came over my eyes as I looked on this lonely place where Rupert Brooke died, and I remembered so vividly the first time I heard his poems'

QLawFoundation: Announcing our AMAZING speaker lineup for QLaw Foundation's 2020 Falltacular - Fan the Flames of Love and Justice! Join Chase Strangio, Imani Rupert-Gordon, Sen. Marko Liias, and Brooke Fox at Falltacular! - get your tickets today!

CaptionsMatthew: 'Stands the Church clock at ten to three? And is there honey still for tea?' 'The Old Vicarage, Grantchester', Rupert Brooke

laetitiakriel: A kiss makes the heart young again and wipes out the years - Rupert Brooke

carylloper: A kiss makes the heart young again and wipes out the years ~ Rupert Brooke

ofgeography: good morning today has begun reading nabokov’s essay on rupert brooke where basically all the two of them do is think about how sad it is that you can’t make out in heaven

war_poets: 24 September 1914 Rupert Brooke writes ‘I haven’t precisely joined the Army: but I’ve joined the Navy–a more English thing to do, I think'

michaelscaines: Rupert [Brooke] is a queer personage – an odd mixture of acridity and flabbiness – and on the whole he rather annoys me.. He writes rather futile poetry, proposes a philosophy of quietude and general mist. I don’t understand these philosophies. – Lytton Strachey, Sept 24 1908

pmbowles: With apologies to Rupert Brooke: "If I should die, think only this of me: That there's some corner of a Kentish field That is forever E.U."

BeytullahAfsin: But somewhere, beyond Space and Time Is wetter water, slimier slime! Rupert Brooke

brymcclure: the red sweet wine of youth gave up the years to be of work and joy and that unhoped serene that men call age and those who would have been their sons they gave their immortality.’ The final section of the memorial are lines from the poet Rupert Brooke from his The Soldier sonnet

Bella99035779: Investigate Michael Gove and Rupert Murdoch's relationship, says Ian Hislop | The Independent | The Independent

obinnachukwuzie: "A kiss makes the heart young again and wipe out the years" ~Rupert Brooke

ColinBa60931122: Another quote from Rupert Brooke 1887-1915 Back tomorrow hopefully.

BloomAthletics: Girls Tennis defeated Lewisburg 3-2. Winning in singles was Dana Lee, Brooke Keister, and Sarah Bower.

QIQ_EveryDay: A book may be compared to your neighbor: if it be good, it cannot last too long; if bad, you cannot get rid of it too early. :- Rupert Brooke

ColinBa60931122: Quote from Rupert Brooke 1887-1915 Goodnight all.

jacob_jen828: Rupert Brooke, English poet who died in World War I via /r/VintageLadyBoners

WarPoetsAssn: nearly a year before he went to France, in the mould of Rupert Brooke, of whom Ivor was soon to disapprove: To The Poet Before Battle Now, youth, the hour of thy dread passion comes: Thy lovely things must all be laid away; And thou, as others, must face the riven day

agameganon: In honour of that time I introduced him into my essay written for my final English Literature A-Level exam as ‘the indelibly handsome Rupert Brooke.’

mgeorg11: "Breathless, we flung us on the windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." ... - Rupert Brooke "The Hill"

chris_ryates: couldn’t respond to any emails in the past 48 hours because I was very busy thinking about Rupert Brooke in a college production of Comus

CailinCeltic: Where Beauty and Beauty met, Earths still a-tremble there, And winds are scented yet, And memory-soft the air, Bosoming,folding glints of light, And shreds of shadowy laughter; Not the tears that fill the years After - after - Beauty And Beauty - Rupert Brooke

Gurdur: Typhus (usually Rickettsia prowazekii) was always THE military nightmare, from before the days of the Roman Empire armies onwards. Rupert Brooke, on the other hand, who glorified war in poetry, died in WW1 of an infected mosquito bite, so probably Streptococcus pyogenes.

GitaMadhu: This Side of Paradise, based on Fitzgerald's debut novel - 1920. Amory Blaine, an attractive student dabbles in literature. The novel about love greed and status seeking takes its title from a Rupert Brooke's poem Tiare Tahiti.

RaggedTP: The person who runs Serco is Rupert Soames, brother of Nicolas Soames... Tory MP until 2019. The Soames brothers are grandchildren of Winston Churchill. This might explain why Serco keep getting all these contracts despite being overwhelmingly awful at everything they touch.

Gary23077594: Wordplay - Poetry - The Soldier by Rupert Brooke

war_poets: 12 September 1915 Joyce Kilmer reviews Rupert Brooke’s poems in the New York Times.

pinkmoose: one of the sailors at fishers tonight looked like an ever so updated rupert brooke, but more tradey. he will be my new husband.

JulieParker88: Justr added to RedRococoGarden! Poems by Rupert Brooke, Buckland-Wright illustrations, Folio Society 1959 (1948), slipcase, wartime poetry, World War One, war poets

RoadSafetyWarks: Residents who visited the Rupert Brooke JD Wetherspoon pub in Rugby over the Bank Holiday weekend (29th to 31st August) are being advised that a group of four people visiting the pub over those dates have since tested positive for Covid-19. Read more:

WCCPublicHealth: Residents who visited the Rupert Brooke JD Wetherspoon pub in Rugby over the Bank Holiday weekend (29th to 31st August) are being advised that a group of four people visiting the pub over those dates have since tested positive for Covid-19. Read more:

welfordwrites: Cities, like cats, will reveal themselves at night. Rupert Brooke

ledansemacabre: The mysteries of the Trend ... but we'll take it ;->

swampdiety: ok rupert brooke

ProfGSheffield: Nonsense. In the British army Rupert Brooke still had his fans.

danirosepoet: I am so fascinated by the similarities between sport and art. George Mallory, famed early 20th c. mountaineer, wanted so, so badly to be a poet. A friend of Rupert Brooke who fell in love with James Strachey, Mallory called his climbing "art" without a hint of sarcasm.

ykstosta: SHERLOCK S4 (2017) Benedict Cumberbatch, Martin Freeman, Mark Gatiss, Louise Brealey, Gian Brooke, Amanda Abbington, Andrew Scott, Rupert Graves, Una Stubbs 9.8/10

venetianblonde: Rupert Brooke was born at Rugby and died on the way to Gallipoli in 1915. He was 27. His brother William was also killed, in battle, in 1915. The Brookes were heroes, not losers or suckers. "Tlare Tahiti," F. Scott Fitzgerald's favorite Rupert Brooke poem.

Denis_L_Onyango: This is sad ! Irresponsible to say the least I think the best response to Trump’s denigration of veterans /soldiers who fall in battle in my opinion is perhaps written more than a century ago by the English poet Rupert Brooke. It’s called “The Soldier.” Brooke himself was killed

jseglin: --Rupert Brooke, "The Soldier"

NickKristof: The best response to President Trump’s denigration of soldiers who fall in battle was perhaps written more than a century ago by the English poet Rupert Brooke. It’s called “The Soldier.” Brooke himself was killed…

Knit_The_Terror: Rupert Brooke. 1914.



Write your comment about Rupert Brooke


Poem of the day

Emily Dickinson Poem
Sometimes with the Heart
 by Emily Dickinson

1680

Sometimes with the Heart
Seldom with the Soul
Scarcer once with the Might
Few-love at all.


...

Read complete poem

Popular Poets