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myrddinembreis: I also really like the first stanza of The Soldier by Rupert Brooke if only for the heart wrenching phrase 'There's some corner of a foreign field that is for ever England'.

CaptionsMatthew: 'Oh, is the water sweet and cool, Gentle and brown, above the pool? And laughs the immortal river still Under the mill, under the mill?' From 'The Old Vicarage, Grantchester' by Rupert Brooke.

war_poets: 8 August 1915 Vera Brittain writes to Roland Leighton ‘I am so glad you liked Rupert Brooke. I too read the book straight through & then wanted to ‘write things myself’ very badly indeed.’

commonor_garden: Went for a morning swim in the Cam at Granchester then a Ploughman's in what used to be Rupert Brooke's garden. ☀️

mpiccolob: “I only know that you may lie Day-long and watch the Cambridge sky, And, flower-lulled in sleepy grass, Hear the cool lapse of hours pass, Until the centuries blend and blur In Grantchester, in Grantchester. . .” (The Old Vicarage - Rupert Brooke)

MrSmithRE: Early morning swim in the Cam then tea in Rupert Brooke's old garden.

MorganHaigh: Rupert Brooke. Bit good, isn't he...

Adrian_Dalby: Agatha Christie's Marple: A Pocket Full of Rye Julia McKenzie, Prunella Scales, Matthew Macfadyen, Ralf Little, Wendy Richard, Rupert Graves, Helen Baxendale, Anna Madeley, Joseph Beattie, Ben Miles, Liz White, Hattie Morahan, Paul Brooke, Chris Larkin, Rachel Atkins ITV3 10.35am

HistoryExtra: From scathing verses on the horrors of life in the trenches to laments on the tragedy of a lost generation…

relevantqueer: THE RELEVANT QUEER: Poet Rupert Brooke, Born August 3, 1887

relevantqueer: THE RELEVANT QUEER: Poet Rupert Brooke, Born August 3, 1887

relevantqueer: THE RELEVANT QUEER: Poet Rupert Brooke, Born August 3, 1887

ImageAmplified: THE RELEVANT QUEER: Poet Rupert Brooke, Born August 3, 1887

cowboycoleridge: The Lovers' Chronicle 3 August - Rhythm and Weep, verse by mac tag - verse by Rupert Brooke - birth of Dolores Del Rio

NORTHTRENTON: Happy Birthday to William Kennedy Dickson (d. 1935), Geza Gardonyi (d. 1922), Stanley Baldwin (d. 1947), Vernon Louis Parrington (d. 1929), Haakon VII of Norway (d. 1957), Maithili Sharan Gupt (d. 1964), Rupert Brooke (d. 1915) and Konstantin Melnikov (d. 1974).

versifynow: Aug 4 2020 after a photograph Rupert Brooke, 1913 ~ my drawing

GylesB1: Day 133 of poetry & jumpers. Yesterday was Rupert Brooke’s birthday, so today I’m sharing a few lines from his famous poem - written when he was in Berlin in 1912 - about The Old Vicarage, Grantchester.

soriverlibrary: THE BOY FROM RUGBY Rupert Chawner Brooke was an English poet known for his idealistic war sonnets written during the First World War, especially "The Soldier". He was also known for his boyish good looks August 3, 1887, Rugby, United Kingdom

ARTSalamode: "Till Heaven cracks, and Hell thereunder Dies in her ultimate mad fire, ...with scornful thunder, On dreams of men and men's desire. Then only in the empty spaces, Death, walking very silently, Shall fear the glory of our faces Through all the dark infinity..." Rupert Brooke

SSBrockville: Rupert Brooke (3 August 1887 – 23 April 1915) was an English poet known for his idealistic war sonnets written during the First World War, especially "The Soldier".

SSBDupont: Rupert Brooke (3 August 1887 – 23 April 1915) was an English poet known for his idealistic war sonnets written during the First World War, especially "The Soldier".

MelanieJaxn: "If I should die, think only this of me: that there's some corner of a foreign field that is forever England." ~ Happy birthday, Rupert Brooke

ptully262: "These I have loved: White plates and cups, clean-gleaming, Ringed with blue lines; and feathery, faery dust; Wet roofs, beneath the lamp-light; the strong crust Of friendly bread; and many-tasting food; Rainbows; and the blue bitter smoke of wood; ..." --Rupert Brooke, b. 1887.

Book_Addict: Happy birthday to English poet Rupert Brooke (August 3,1887), author of the poem "The Soldier" et al.

silversmithsara: As I mentioned lilacs yesterday (and keeping in Cambridgeshire) - yet another part of a Rupert Brooke poem on the date of his birth. The Old Vicarage, Grantchester Just now the lilac is in bloom, All before my little room; Pic: Newnham college, Cambridge

SPKlein52: “A kiss makes the heart young again and wipes out the years.” ~ Rupert Chawner Brooke {3 August 1887 – 23 April 1915}

ConOfOurGen: “We always love those who admire us; we do not always love those whom we admire.” -Rupert Brooke

GrantHayter: Born this day in 1887, died 23 April 1915 - Rupert Brooke. This volume is one of 6000 published that autumn. It was a treasure of the library of my late godfather & mentor, the playwright William Luce, and now of mine.

WaterstonesHarr: Happy Birthday Rupert Brooke (3 Aug 1887 – 23 Apr 1915) poet, known for his idealistic war sonnets written during the First World War, especially "The Soldier".

thingsbehindsun: HBD to Rupert Brooke. A better poet than he was a fighter.

InadeBree: ‘... My night shall be remembered for a star That outshone all the suns of all men’s days.’ Rupert Brooke, The Great Lover

ricordotorg: Freethought of the Day

Troy_Wise: THE RELEVANT QUEER: Poet Rupert Brooke, Born August 3, 1887

Troy_Wise: THE RELEVANT QUEER: Poet Rupert Brooke, Born August 3, 1887

Troy_Wise: THE RELEVANT QUEER: Poet Rupert Brooke, Born August 3, 1887

urminaia: BD - Rupert Chawner Brooke (3 Aug. 1887 - 23 April 1915).

WCHCDGuides: 3rd August 1887 The birth of Rupert Brooke, the English poet known for his idealistic war sonnets written during the First World War, especially ' The Soldier' that begins 'If I should die, think only this of me: That there's some corner of a foreign field That is forever England

MaggieMackBooks: We always love those who admire us; we do not always love those whom we admire. Rupert Brooke

EnglishTreasure: On this day 3rd August 1887, the poet Rupert Chawner Brooke was born in Rugby, Warwickshire. He is best known for the poetry, which he wrote during the First World War, particularly 'The Soldier'.....

EnglishTreasure: The Soldier by Rupert Brooke... If I should die, think only this of me: That there’s some corner of a foreign field That is for ever England. There shall be iIn that rich earth a richer dust concealed...

war_poets: 3 August 1887 Rupert Brooke is born in Rugby

MitfordUv: Also on this day 1887 Birth of Rupert Brooke - English poet known for idealistic war sonnets written during the WWI Well know one The Soldier - "If I should die, think only this of me: That there's some corner of a foreign field That is forever England"

ExeterUniLib: On this day, the poet Rupert Brooke was born. We have online access to the complete works of his poetry via the Twentieth-Century English Poetry Database. See:

war_poets: 3 August 1915 Ivor Gurney on Rupert Brooke 'The sonnet of R.B. you sent me, I do not like. It seems to me that Rupert Brooke would not have improved with age, would not have broadened; his manner has become a mannerism, both in rhythm and diction.’

KLNenstiel: August 3rd, 1887, is the birthday of English World War I poet Rupert Brooke, who once wrote: "I know what things are good: friendship and work and conversation. These I shall have."

HBurpday: August 3 Today is the anniversary of the birth of Elisha Otis (1811) Stanley Baldwin (1867) Rupert Brooke (1887) John T Scopes (1900) Ernie Pyle (1900) Dolores del Río (1904) 1/2

BeineckeLibrary: Rupert Brooke letters to Dudley Ward and to Frances Cornford, 1908-1915. More:

LucyLondon7: WW1 soldier poet Rupert Brooke was born on 3rd August 1887

DCNATV: Quote "A kiss makes the heart young again and wipes out the years." — Rupert Brooke (August 03, 1887)

silversmithsara: Another Rupert Brooke Poem on the date of his birth The Old Vicarage, Grantchester …………………………………oh! yet Stands the Church clock at ten to three? And is there honey still for tea? Pics: Grantchester and old vicarage

wherrypilgrim: Rupert Brooke, born Aug 3, 1887. WB Yeats reportedly called him “the handsomest young man in England." His haunting poem "Fragment" can be read here:

gatch44: A book may be compared to your neighbour: if it be good, it cannot last too long; if bad, you cannot get rid of it too early.......Rupert Brooke

FXMC1957: 3 August 1887. Rupert Brooke, one of the WW1 poets, was born in Rugby. One of his best poems of WW1 was The Soldier. He was also known for his good looks, prompting the Irish poet W. B. Yeats to describe him as ‘the handsomest young man in England’.

WelsteadTed: Rupert Brooke, Great poet! Bet they don't teach that now!

laidmanr: RIP Rupert Brooke

war_poets: 2 August 1915 Roland Leighton writes to Vera Brittain 'thank you so much for Rupert Brooke. It came this morning and I have just read it straight through... I used to talk of the Beauty of War; but it is only War in the abstract that is beautiful;'

war_poets: 1 August 1914 Rupert Brooke writes ‘I grow irritated with Russia. & more than irritated with myself & my poem. What a state of mind for the 1st of August! If war comes, should one enlist? or turn war correspondent? or what? I can’t sit still. I wish I could fly.'

timothyrhaslett: The Soldier by Rupert Brooke was the first poem that made me realise what poetry was about

timothyrhaslett: The Soldier by Rupert Brooke was the first poem that made me realise what poetry was about

war_poets: 29 July 1915 Vera Brittain writes to Roland Leighton ‘I am sending you this afternoon the poems of your brother-spirit, Rupert Brooke. I think you will love them all, as I do; not the War Sonnets only, though they are perhaps the most beautiful.’

iloveukcoast: Rupert Brooke and his love for Grantchester

wonderspodcast: And "Dust" was Kirwan's best song, although he lifted the lyrics from a 1910 Rupert Brooke poem. The guitar and keyboard interplay and driving rhythm section belie the soft rock feel.

RugSch_Heritage: Rupert Brooke was also a student at Rugby School.

RSPCA_Bookshop: Rupert Brooke & James Strachey

MichaelCroland: The Dover Thrift edition of THE POEMS OF RUPERT BROOKE is out now! His patriotic devotion to England inspired his country during World War I. Later, some critics questioned whether his selfless willingness to die for his country was naive.

MikalebRoehrig: Quarantine hair update: I’m not leaving the house again until I’ve the full Rupert Brooke

Grailgirl: James Gilchrist will sing my setting of Rupert Brooke's sonnet 'The Goddess in the Wood" on Bitsize Proms on FB tonight at 7.00pm.

MelmothBooks: Our 1921 edition of the Collected Poems of Rupert Brooke, in its Hatchards binding, will be listed shortly. A Ninth Impression, and in lovely condition, it also includes a Memoir written by E. M. in August 2015, just a few months after the poet’s death.

war_poets: 18 July 1915 Roland Leighton asks Vera Brittain to send him a copy of Rupert Brooke's poems.

Old_Thunder_: After leaving Rugby, Rupert Brooke went up to King’s College, Cambridge. In May 1907, he met Belloc there. You must never meet your heroes, but Brooke did, and was impressed.

welfordwrites: Cities, like cats, will reveal themselves at night. Rupert Brooke

NorfolkLibs: Today's poem is The Little Dog's Day by Rupert Brooke.

tzachiaknin: The Soldier - 1914 Rupert Brooke If I should die, think only this of me: That there's some corner of a foreign field That is for ever England. There shall be In that rich earth a richer…

thepugwashman: "The Old Vicarage, Grantchester" by Rupert Brooke (read by Tom O'Bedlam)

JohnLoony: I have just recited "The Old Vicarage, Grantchester" by Rupert Brooke in 6 minutes 58 seconds, even though it's 140 lines. It takes more than 7 minutes to recite "The Secret People" by G.K. Chesterton, which is 60 lines.

cjfaraday: ... "though these would be hard to know the full worth of. But when the tree or the wall or the situation meets us in real life, they find profounder hosts. In the transience and hurry Art opens out every way onto the Eternal Ends." - Rupert Brooke, Democracy and the Arts, 1910

TheOrchardTea: Just a few hundred yards from this lovely meadow is the Orchard Tea Garden, famous for Rupert Brooke, Virginia Woolf, its famous cream teas and more recently a darn good Pimm’s. Well work the extra walk.

LunarLast: "Close in the nest is folded every weary wing..." Rupert Brooke, Day That I Have Loved (art by William Henry Hunt)

ReasonableDr: How long surviving was the amalgamation of knightly chivalry and union with Christ in the Eucharist that emerged from the age of the Crusades. Even in 1914, Rupert Brooke could write of the 'red sweet wine of dead youth'.

LunarLast: Reading some Rupert Brooke...

LiteraryVienna: Rupert Brooke

LunarLast: I can't get enough of Rupert Brooke this week. I can't tell you how happy this volume makes me. "... I saw the pines against the white north sky, Very beautiful, and still, and bending over Their sharp black heads against a quiet sky. And there was peace in them..."

LunarLast: "...I watched the quivering lamplight fall On plate and flowers and pouring tea And cup and cloth; and they and we Flung all the dancing moments by With jest and glitter..." Rupert Brooke

LunarLast: "...Do you think there's a far border town, somewhere, The desert's edge, last of the lands we know, Some gaunt eventual limit of our light, In which I'll find you waiting; and we'll go Together, hand in hand again..." Rupert Brooke

somequotesbot: "Stands the Church clock at ten to three?And is there honey still for tea?" - Rupert Brooke

LunarLast: "Stands the clock at ten to three? And is there honey still for tea?" Rupert Brooke

EGYPTSNIPPETS: Curious ancient Egypt Hippo poem by famed war poet Rupert Brooke

PJ_10_Cricket: ...and what about the beautiful haunting TB Sheets? If I could have an album it would have to be ASTRAL WEEKS, the BEST most angst-ridden love story ever written. Pure Genius. I am always reminded of Dust by Rupert Brooke

ArsEstHabitus: The Call Out of the nothingness of sleep, The slow dreams of Eternity, There was a thunder on the deep: I came, because you called to me. — Rupert Brooke

Kernowboy2: Fantastic listening about the real characters of the Wardroom in the RND Rupert Brooke & the Glitterati

FitGirlMojo1: A book may be compared to your neighbor: if it be good, it cannot last too long; if bad, you cannot get rid of it too early. :- Rupert Brooke

iloveukcoast: Rupert Brooke and his love for Grantchester

Dr_Ulrichsen: A few years ago, I visited Rupert Brooke’s grave in a peaceful olive grove on the Greek island of Skyros.

HartMilitary: Rupert Brooke - Gary says, 'Gorgeous!' Great poet, served at Antwerp, died on 23 April 1915 from septicaemia. Never quite made Gallipoli.

HartMilitary: Frederick Kelly was not only a brilliant composer and musician but had an Olympic gold medal for rowing in 1908. Stern disciplinarian and a bit of a miserable bugger, but he wrote a fantastic elegy for Rupert Brooke in the trenches of Helles. Killed on 13 November 1916.

carylloper: A kiss makes the heart young again and wipes out the years ~ Rupert Brooke

biltongrange: Congratulations to Evelina on winning the junior category of the Rupert Brooke Poetry competition

GerardArthurM: "Stands the clock at ten to three? And is there honey still for tea?" Rupert Brooke 'The Old Vicarage, Grantchester.'

LadyLazerus_: Rupert Brooke. Virginia Woolf. literally anyone else.



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