Comments about Rupert Brooke

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Heidi_Cuda: bury me in the future, when the inelegance of these times, a bitter memory fades. (“the activist”, a poem by me, inspired by “the soldier” by rupert brooke)

war_poets: 19 January 1915 Rupert Brooke writes 'My present difficulty is: should one marry without being particularly in love, before going to the front? How divine to have even a few hours of what the rest of life is a grey pre-existence to—marriage: with, oh! anybody'

SinanYonal: "Alone, most strangely, I live on." -Rupert Brooke-

war_poets: 18 January 1915 Rupert Brooke writes 'The days go by. I plough through mud: march: drill: eat and sleep: and do not question more. There was some affair at Antwerp, I remember. I have a recollection of a burning city, the din of cannonades, a shattered railway-station'

mflibra: 1930 Nice RIVIERE Binding - The Collected Poems of Rupert Brooke. With a Memoir.

mflibra: 1930 Nice RIVIERE Binding - The Collected Poems of Rupert Brooke. With a Memoir.

waltentiern: I'm utterly spent from thinking about the present so I'm indulging in some escapism in the form of Rupert Brooke's eyes

Yashkha59788546: A kiss makes the heart young again and wipes out the years. -Rupert Brooke NO EIJAZ NO BB14

PotterheadPosts: Rupert Grint and Matt Lewis were sorted into Hufflepuff on Pottermore; Bonnie Wright and Evanna Lynch were sorted into Gryffindor.

TheNewEuropean: The watery connection linking Johann Sebastian Bach and Rupert Brooke

ORCATWT: and the soldier by rupert brooke is literally talking about niki “...Gave, once, her flowers to love...” “...In hearts at oeace, under an English heaven.” ITS LITERALLY ABOUT HER FIGHT ME

bushofthewim: BASICALLY the theory goes - you know when bunny asks richard to go over and help him pack for Italy and basically just annoys him, and the next day bunny puts a pack of junior mints and a Rupert Brooke book in his mailbox to apologise?

bushofthewim: well, why did bunny give richard the Rupert Brooke book? seems random right? probably is, but what if it was because richard reminds him of Rupert Brooke? considering these nerdy classics students wouldn’t have the biggest pool of references for lookalikes for their mates

bushofthewim: Rupert Brooke was known as ‘the handsomest young man in England’ and was also bi. maybe that means something. idk. and look - messy brown hair, possibly freckly - all canon about richards appearance!

bushofthewim: update: I found it! here is the credit for the bunny-gives-richard-the-Rupert-Brooke-book-because-he-looks-like-him-theory - it’s towards the bottom of the page :)

EGirlBiz98: A book may be compared to your neighbor: if it be good, it cannot last too long; if bad, you cannot get rid of it too early. :- Rupert Brooke

war_poets: 13/14 January 1915 Rupert Brooke write to Dudley Ward ‘waiting for me in the ante-room was a letter forwarded by the Dead Letter Office from Ottawa, ‘recovered’ by divers from the wreck of the Empress of Ireland. Rather frayed at the edges, and the ink much washed out.'

ClarkeMicah: ‘*Here* tulips bloom as they are told; unkempt about *those* hedges blows an English unofficial rose; and *there* the unregulated sun slopes down to rest when day is done’ . What would Rupert Brooke (dreaming of home in a bureaucratic Berlin) make of today’s regulated England?

richardhalftwo: I inherited some poetry books from my Grandmother - two here of Rupert Brooke's. Inscription: Winifred M Wall 1/1/24. Though famous for war poems, this is my favourite: The Fish, c.1910 Words are inadequate to praise the brilliance. Here's the 1st page:

war_poets: In a letter postmarked 11 January 15 Rupert Brooke writes 'Christmas Day in the Naval Division is a revelation. The Battalion C.P.O., a very fat man, who has been drunk since dawn, is conducting the band in an Irish jig in the middle of the parade-ground.'

witterton: ....And in that Heaven of all their wish, There shall be no more land, say fish. Rupert Brooke

DurhamWASP: God! I will pack, and take a train, And get me to England once again! For England's the one land, I know, Where men with Splendid Hearts may go. Rupert Brooke

war_poets: 10 January 1915 Rupert Brooke writes to Dudley Ward ‘I’ll tell [mother] to let you know if I’m wounded or anything. And if you receive such news, will you keep communicating it to the damsel whose address is in this envelope? I promised her to arrange it in this way'

CaptionsMatthew: Just been out and the fields are snow covered and bare. But looking at this I am reminded again of my Rupert Brooke, 'And is there honey still for tea?'

seventh7rainbow: "Stands the Church clock at ten to three? And is there honey still for tea?" - Rupert Brooke Having employed imagery of England's glorious past to sell the UK...well, almost everything, here's the government's real agenda. So, no, Rupert; the honey's just another empty promise.

tomlanecomposer: The piece is for SATB choir a cappella and sets the wonderful poem of the same name by Rupert Brooke. I think it’s incredible how relevant the words are to what we are currently experiencing

war_poets: 7 January 1917 Ivor Gurney mentions other war poets in a letter to Marion Scott ‘There are many good war poems. Harvey, Binyon, Rupert Brooke, Wilfred Gibson, and so I have been told, G.K. Chesterton’s “Wife of Flanders” . . . and then there’s Hardy and Captain Grenfell.’

war_poets: 4 January 1915 Rupert Brooke lunches at the Admiralty in London with Denis Browne, Winston Churchill and his wife and the Prime Minister.

DipanjanBhatt20: Owen was one of the prominent trench poets like Siegfried Sassoon John McCrae Rupert Brooke & Alan Seeger .

Grailgirl: Chatting over my setting of Rupert Brooke's sonnet " The Goddess in the Wood" with James Gilchrist and Susanna Stranders.

girlhermes: Rupert Brooke was into his seventh year dead.

LibraryPutney: The greatest poems ever written: “The Soldier” by Rupert Brooke If I should die, think only this of me: That there’s some corner of a foreign field That is for ever England. There shall be In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;

war_poets: 2 January 1915 Rupert Brooke arrives at Walmer Castle to visit the Prime Minister and his daughter Violet.

war_poets: 1 January 1915 Rupert Brooke writes ‘It is queer having leave. Sheets. Hot baths. All sorts of extraordinary things. I’ve simply relapsed with a sigh into civilianity'

war_poets: 1 January 1915 Rupert Brooke writes to his uncle ‘It was very good of you to send a pound for my men. [ ] They bought themselves, halma, draughts (two lots), bezique & various games of throwing rings on to hooks and balls through holes'

paddycassiday: Apparently Rupert Brooke had a little prick, but as anyone who’s ever seen his statue in Rugby can testify, he had enormous bollocks, and that’s what endeared him to his public school chums. “If I should die think only this of me...”

war_poets: 31 December 1914 Rupert Brooke writes ‘The last day of the old year. We are told this morning that we are to play our tie today for the Football Cup. Our Headquarters and Machine Gun Detachment is to play A Squadron Leicestershire Yeomanry.'

PhilRodgers: Rupert Brooke woz ‘ere. He was killed at a young age by a particularly nasty mosquito bite.

carylloper: A kiss makes the heart young again and wipes out the years ~ Rupert Brooke

Alabandine_: British World War I poet Rupert Brooke, 1910s.

war_poets: 25 December 1914 Rupert Brooke writes to Cathleen Nesbitt ‘I spend Christmas in looking after drunken stokers. One of them has been drunk since seven. He neither eats nor drinks, but dances a complicated step up and down his hut, half-dressed, singing'

lizziespeller: “Fish (fly-replete, in depth of June, Dawdling away their wat'ry noon) Ponder deep wisdom, dark or clear, Each secret fishy hope or fear.” Heaven, by Rupert Brooke

Rob_Kimbell: 'A kiss makes the heart young again and wipes out the years', wrote the iconic English poet Rupert Brooke. Except during 2020 in the midst of COVID-19.

Rob_Kimbell: 'Cities, like cats, will reveal themselves at night', wrote the iconic English poet Rupert Brooke. Except during 2020 in the midst of COVID-19.

SkylarJordan: A few more historic hotties 1) Rupert Brooke, a poet who Yeats once described as the handsomest boy in England 2) Oliver Messel, a Tony-winning stage designer and grandson of Punch cartoonist Linley Sambourne 3) Egon Schiele, an Austrian painter (and one of my favourites)

TTLastSpring: Toronto, soul of Canada, is wealthy, busy, commercial, Scotch, absorbent of whisky. Rupert Brooke c. 1916

ITattum: Walking over dinosaurs. A forgotten tale of buried treasure by Ian Tattum Walkers ,cultural historians and nature writers tend to be shy of the coprolite fertiliser industry. Ichthyosaurs, Mary Anning and Rupert Brooke all feature.

welfordwrites: Cities, like cats, will reveal themselves at night. Rupert Brooke

twistopherrobin: What Bernie doesn't realize (I think) is that he has received the coveted Rupert Brooke Prize for What Might Have Been (though, in Bernie's case, he didn't have to die in battle to get it.) No public figure, especially an American public figure, can do better than this.

leo_bizzz: A kiss makes the heart young again and wipes out the years. ~ Rupert Brooke LOOVANA CheerUpSUNDAY

war_poets: 20 December 1914 Rupert Brooke writes to his mother ‘About mince pies and cakes – we’re feeding half the company: about 120 men. Turkey, plum-puddings etc. at midday: that’s arranged for. Mince-pies etc. for ta. Just as many as you can make

christmaspyes: 20 December 1914 Rupert Brooke writes to his mother ‘About Christmas Pies and cakes – we’re feeding half the company: a…

karieoffline: If you wondered what I was like at 17, I sat in the library reading Rupert Brooke's letters.

Randy_Anglo: And laughter, learnt of friends; and gentleness, In hearts at peace, under an English heaven. The famous Part V of Rupert Brooke's poem 1914. Read the other parts too, it's a much more complex poem that it's given credit for by many. Brooke has an amazing...

war_poets: 15 December 1914 Rupert Brooke writes to Marchesa Capponi ‘If you have any gifts for the troops send them to me. I’ve a nice lot of scoundrels under me. I expect to go out in the end of January again – make America help the Belgians – I saw their suffering. It is terrible.'

FlashForFreedom: “Mother wants to do some Monet styled arty photo, but it’s taking ages, and I’d rather be upstairs reading Rupert Brooke.”

danirosepoet: So I take someone like George Mallory. Who may or may not have been the first westerner to reach the top of Mount Everest on either the 8th or 9th of June, 1924. Mallory wanted to be a writer. His friendship with Rupert Brooke is frequently ... /3

EGirlBiz98: A book may be compared to your neighbor: if it be good, it cannot last too long; if bad, you cannot get rid of it too early. :- Rupert Brooke

realEricShaffer: Ya know, kinda like Rupert Brooke or Lord Byron for the cubby chasers out there.

war_poets: 7 December 1914 Rupert Brooke writes to W. Denis Browne ‘I was not only second in command of a Nelson Company: but also Acting-Adjutant! I had the keys of Death & Hell, & laid them down for no. 3 Platoon A Cpny Hood'

praashok: Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass. Rupert Brooke

ITattum: If you don’t know about the Victorian industry that left few traces. A saga beginning with ichthyosaurs, featuring Mary Anning and Rupert Brooke. A fossil fuel industry that died.

pirateirwin: G'Day Hugs Piratical xx “Cities, like cats, will reveal themselves at night.” ― Rupert Brooke

pirateirwin: “Love is a flame; - we have beaconed the world's night. A city: - and we have built it, these and I. An emperor: - we have taught the world to die.” ― Rupert Brooke

WikiPlotBot: Making Love: - Oncologist - Los Angeles - Television network - College - Gilbert and Sullivan - Rupert Brooke - Gay bar - West Hollywood - Hedonism - Emotionally abusive - New York City - Investment banking - Architect - Stay at home mom

war_poets: 5 December 1914 Rupert Brooke writes 'there’s a very charming and beautiful American youth, infinitely industrious and simple beyond belief. And finally there’s a very hard bitter man, a poet, very strong and silent, called Rupert Brooke.’

geo_mci: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

war_poets: 3 December 1914 Rupert Brooke writes ‘I’m largely dissatisfied with the English, just now. The good ones are all right. And it’s curiously far away from us (if we haven’t the Belgians in memory, as I have). But there’s a ghastly sort of apathy over half the country'

masecdante: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

miumismatic: Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass. Rupert Brooke

ProfiletreeCV: “Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass.” - Rupert Brooke

dotQuote: Rupert Brooke: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass."

AridaySerrot: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

sunil2pdl: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

foodie_pinoy: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

amitsingh007s: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

SpotOn_DRTV: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

bout1953: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

championmarwan: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

LifebyLawson: Nature Quote of the Day: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." - Rupert Brooke

skilltestic: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

AhmadKaraki: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

EmilyFantaskey: Nature Quote of the Day: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." - Rupert Brooke

marybyrns2: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

LaurakittyLaura: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

Dankmus21: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

CulturalCapture: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." - Rupert Brooke

shattrnthenorm: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

maurilioberetta: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

JKTipsTricks: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

myroamingspirit: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

Muhammad_Speed: Nature Quote of the Day: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." - Rupert Brooke

FrancePubli: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

EnhancedWithin: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

ChickenNRoses2: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

TweetBabe77: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

noneall180: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

es_tody: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

ronnieruff: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke

MattSoares2: "Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill, Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass." — Rupert Brooke



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