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MichelleU_Wood: Fair flower, that dost so comely grow, Hid in this silent, dull retreat, Untouch’d thy honey’d blossoms blow, Unseen thy little branches greet:    No roving foot shall crush thee here,    No busy hand provoke a tear. The Wild Honeysuckle Philip Freneau - 1752-1832

POETSorg: Without your showers, I breed no flowers, Each field a barren waste appears; If you don't weep, my blossoms sleep, They take such pleasures in your tears. —Philip Freneau

NJCSSNetwork: Decision Activity: Philip Freneau – Matawan, NJ, Monmouth County, 1778

KatrinaMartling: By feeble hands the shallow graves were made, No stone memorial o'er the corpses laid; In barren sands, and far from home, they lie, No friend to shed a tear, when passing by; - The British Prison Ship Philip Freneau 1780

SalinaBBaker: The Battle of Eutaw Springs by Don Troiani. Colonel William Washington is unhorsed. American Revolution poet Philip Freneau wrote At Eutaw Springs the valiant died; Their limbs with dirt are covered o’er— Weep on, ye springs, your tearful tide; How many heroes are no more!

JimLoftus4: Fair flower, that dost so comely grow, Hid in this silent, dull retreat, Philip Freneau

juliacadenasku: It is interesting to learn about how “fake news” has been a thing since the first president. Even George Washington experienced backlash in attempts to stain his name, discredit his work, and many more. The National Gazzette run by Philip Freneau & the Aurora General Advertiser

DavidCranmerUn1: operating today as the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. At age 19 he entered the College of New Jersey, now Princeton University, where he joined Philip Morin Freneau, James Madison, and others in forming the American Whig Society to counter the conservative Cliosophic, or Tory,

NathanWurtzel: Philip Freneau was hired at State by Thomas Jefferson as a translator, despite speaking only French (which Jefferson knew well) and English. This gave him a government salary to live on while his National Gazette attacked Washington and Hamilton. In the 1790s.

ArchieG1946: And then my possible additions: John Winthrop Franklin Brockden Brown Philip Freneau Cooper (excerpts) Harriet Beecher Stowe (excerpts) Whittier Longfellow Bryant

Book_Addict: Happy birthday to writer/poet/editor Philip Freneau (January 2,1752), author of the 1780 poem "The English Prison Ship" et al.

JoeBilby1: Today in NJ history: January 2, 1752: Philip Freneau, “poet of the American Revolution,” Princeton graduate, NJ militiaman, sometime privateer, political activist and newspaper editor, born in NYC. Freneau was raised in Monmouth County and forever after was associated with NJ.

beyond_breakers: Patrons! As promised in the December Bonus episode (Prison Hulks - Part 1) Tanner has recorded a reading of Philip Freneau's poem "The British Prison Ship" Head on over to Patreon to check it out!

SowderBill: Poems for Winter - 1/2 “[‘Tis the first snow—]” by Matsuo Basho “[Locked away we’re like a Russian novel:]” by Gabrielle Calvocoressi “The World” by Jennifer Chang “The Seasons Moralized” by Philip Freneau “The Sun in Bemidji, Minnesota” by Sean Hill

MonCountyParks: Today in History: On December 18, 1832, Philip Morin Freneau passed away while walking back to his home in Matawan. During his 80 years, Freneau was...

plastic_bio: Then rushed to meet the insulting foe;They took the spear, but left the shield. - Philip Morin Freneau

divevil: his shows reminded me of the wild honeysuckle by philip freneau

250_ago: Sept. 25, 1771: Graduating student, Philip Freneau recites "A poem, on the rising glory of America" at the College of New Jersey's commencement. In the audience was another graduating student, James Madison.

DavidInProgress: An unfortunate historical tradition. Philip Freneau was Thomas Jefferson's Bannon, and they sought to cripple Washington's presidency from the start.

MyCaptainSlappy: A patently false statement, since the only law of this imaginary land has always been "discretion" and "interpretation" before the ink even dried. (See- Philip Freneau, 1792) You had your run of re-definition, now I get mine. It's only fair.

WhooIAmNot: Pestilence - Philip Morin Freneau (1752-1832)

davidmgoetz: Just was reading the old poet Philip Freneau and encountered his line, "In spite of all the learned have said, I still my old opinion keep," and it made me think of the internet.

LiteraryRob: Far different prospects Neptune yields: Philip Freneau's poem "The Invitation" about the day John Paul Jones took command of several ships, August 14, 1779 --

publius57: A thoughtful colleague gave me these Jefferson and Franklin finger puppets which I will use to entertain my granddaughter. I’m hoping to acquire Philip Freneau and James Callender finger puppets. We can play a game where they slavishly regurgitate slanderous gossip from TJ.

Endymion1989: It's gonna be virology. Has the "logos"-related suffix. "Britishness as Virology in the Poems of Philip Freneau" "The Virological Imagination and the Gawain Poet" "Virology and Virtue on the Jacobean Stage" "Virological Modernisms"

johnsondebaufre: Our second Bailey acquisition is from 1809 and is the 3rd edition of Philip Freneau's Poems, which bears Bailey's full name on its title page.

DimitarAlekseev: My new video: Early American Gothic: Philip Freneau, Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar All...

IllinoisRBML: Happy Independence Day! Philip Freneau was called the “Poet of the American Revolution.” He donated the copyrights for this third edition of his popular book to Lydia Bailey, who would later become one of the major printers in Philadelphia. Shelfmark 811 F88p1809.

LiteraryRob: The hour draws nigh, the glass is almost run: Philip Freneau's poem "To the Americans" gladly embraces the term "Rebels" assigned by British forces, June 11, 1775 --

Boston1775: In which I am not impressed by the “evidence” that John Singleton Copley painted a portrait of Philip Freneau:

max_rainet: The Poems of Freneau, American Authors Series. Philip Freneau, edited with intro by Harry Hayden Clark. American Authors series edited by Stanley T. Williams, Harcourt Brace and Company 1929 ~ view

KarenAChase: Founding father Philip Freneau was fond of words but hated pictures & did not sit for portraits. Mike Chartier, who owns Freneau’s former home, wondered: What did this guy look like? After years of sleuthing, Chartier discovered the answer.

metinsolmaz: “In reason’s scale his actions weigh’d / His spirits want no foreign aid / Long life is his, in vigour passes / A spring that never grew stale / Such virtue lies in Adam’s Ale.” 1792, Philip Freneau Adam's Ale su demekmiş argoda :)

HabbyMomma: Without your showers, I breed no flowers, Each field a barren waste appears; If you don't weep, my blossoms sleep, They take such pleasures in your tears. –Philip Freneau (1752–1832)

OccultFan: Without your showers, I breed no flowers, Each field a barren waste appears; If you don't weep, my blossoms sleep, They take such pleasures in your tears. –Philip Freneau (1752–1832)

TeresaBacon20: Good Morning, Welcome to My World Without your showers, I breed no flowers, Each field a barren waste appears; If you don't weep, my blossoms sleep, They take such pleasures in your tears. –Philip Freneau (1752–1832)

Nalani_the_Cat: “Now every bullet brought a different wound; ‘Twixt wind and water, one assail’d the side, Through this aperture rush’d the briny tide— ‘Twas then the Master trembled for his crew, And bade thy shores, O Delaware, adieu!—“ —Philip Freneau, The British Prison Ship

Nalani_the_Cat: “...Supporting on the extreme the taught Gib-stay, Twice ten six pounders at their port holes plac’d And rang’d in rows, stood hostile in the waist: Thus all prepar’d, impatient for the seas, She left her station with an adverse breeze...” —Philip Freneau, The Prison Ship

platospupil: Without your showers, I breed no flowers, Each field a barren waste appears; If you don't weep, my blossoms sleep, They take such pleasures in your tears. –Philip Freneau (1752–1832)

Herbinbee: Honeysuckle is hugely valuable to wildlife, supporting several species, many of which are rare. Untouch’d thy honey’d blossoms blow, Unseen thy little branches greet: No roving foot shall crush thee here, No busy hand provoke a tear. - Philip Freneau from The Wild Honeysuckle

MDH_GFU: 2/2 After spending most of the essay discussing Jefferson (no orthodox Christian, to be sure), he notes that others might be added to his list, including Ira Allen, Timothy Matlack, James Cannon, and Philip Freneau. Who knew so many 'famous founders" were essentially atheists?

Rolfus_Adolphus: An oil painting that nearly was lost to history, failed to sell at auction and now may be worth $300,000 arrived last Thursday, amid the snowstorm.

MrMazzella: Freneau comes home! Thomas Jefferson and James Madison must be smiling somewhere.

WhatSellsBest: ‘An oil painting that nearly was lost to history, failed to sell (at $5,000) at auction and now may be worth $300,000’

DPCarmodyAPP: When no one knew who was in the painting, it was priced at $5,000 to $7,000 and didn't sell. Now it could be worth $300,000.

NJHoopsHaven: When you solve a 200-year-old art mystery involving a Founding Father, and suddenly a portrait that couldn't sell might be worth $300,000. My latest for news:

KarlSteel: Are specialists in the poetry of Philip Freneau Freneaulogists?

POETSorg: Emperors and kings! in vain you strive Your torments to conceal— The age is come that shakes your thrones, Tramples in dust despotic crowns, And bids the sceptre fail. —Philip Freneau

mseth_: If nothing once, you nothing lose, For when you die you are the same, -Philip Freneau

fascicles: "Be ours the task the ambitious to restrain, And this great lesson teach—that kings are vain; That warring realms to certain ruin haste, That kings subsist by war, and wars are waste" Philip Freneau, "On Mr. Paine's 'Rights of Man'"

JoeBilby1: Today in NJ history: January 2, 1752: Philip Freneau, “poet of the American Revolution,” Princeton grad, NJ militiaman, privateer, political activist and newspaper editor, was born in New York City. Raised in Monmouth County and forever after was associated with New Jersey.

Book_Addict: Happy birthday to writer/poet/editor Philip Freneau (January 2,1752), author of the 1780 poem "The English Prison Ship" et al.

PoetAndPriest: a broadside, “The Funeral Dirge of George Washington and James Wilson, King and Judge,” attributed to Philip Freneau, and describing the death on the guillotine and the funeral of the President and Associate Justice of the Supreme Court James Wilson

bkesling: “Thus He whom Rome’s proud legions sway’d, Beturn’d, and sought his sylvan shade.” - Philip Freneau (From his poem about George Washington’s return to Va. despite calls for him to take ever more power. The parallel to Cincinnatus was then, as it should be now, highest praise.)

AsburyParkPress: A video tour of Matawan's historic Philip Freneau house. Built in 1818, it's for sale.

AsburyParkPress: A look at the colorful story of a key figure of the American Revolution -- and the challenges of selling a 200-year-old treasure.

kacytillman: Doctors raving and disputing Death’s pale army still recruiting — What a pother One with t’other Some a-writing, some a-shooting. Nature’s poisons here collected, Water, earth, and air infected— O’ what a pity Such a City, Was in such a place erected! Philip Freneau, 1790s

ColumbiaMayor: Raise a glass! On this day 238 years ago, Lt. Col. John Laurens was killed in action in a skirmish along the Combahee River in South Carolina. He was 27 years old. Where her palmetto shades the adjacent deeps, Affection sighs, and Carolina weeps! ~Philip Freneau 1/4

NJHoopsHaven: One of Monmouth County's most historic homes was built in 1818 by a Founding Father of the American Revolution. Now it's for sale, and everyone has fingers crossed that it lands with the right buyer. History buffs, you'll like this:

rrossAPP: Want to own the home of one of George Washington's fiercest critics? Now you can.

LiteraryRob: To share the dangers of the sea: John Paul Jones took command of several ships on August 14, 1779; the date was immortalized in poetry by Philip Freneau in the poem "The Invitation" --

ryanraysr: By Philip Freneau (1752-1832) With clearance from BELLONA won She spread her wings to meet the Sun, Those golden regions to explore Where George forbade to sail before.

RickyFitness2: And here fair freedom shall forever reign. I see a train, a glorious train appear, Of Patriots plac'd in equal fame with those Who nobly fell for Athens or for Rome. - Philip Freneau

Edourdoo: Philip Freneau (1752 – 1832), Jefferson and the National Gazette

pseudiom: An underdiscussed figure of the early United States is Philip Freneau or "America's first poet". Freneau is interesting because he was highly critical of Washington and later turned on politics in general due to his own misanthropy. His poems are uniquely cynical.

Dalyinfocus: “If nothing once, you nothing lose, For when you die you are the same; The space between is but an hour, The frail duration of flower” “The wild Honeysuckle” Philip Freneau - 1786. Wild Honeysuckle West Cork.

LiteraryRob: Rebels you are: Poet Philip Freneau's poem asking colonists to embrace their label as "rebels" after George Washington's letter to Thomas Gage asking for better treatment of officers taken prisoner, June 11, 1775 --

capKinSpAcE: Poem otd Philip Freneau On the Emigration to America To western woods, and lonely plains, Palemon from the crowd departs, Where Nature's wildest genius reigns, To tame the soil, and plant the arts-- What wonders there shall freedom show, What might states successive grow!(1)

preethisadasiv: ~May to April Thus, to repose, all Nature goes; Month after month must find its doom: Time on the wing, May ends the Spring, And Summer dances on her tomb! —Philip Freneau

Khadhdhie: Thus, to repose, all Nature goes; Month after month must find its doom: Time on the wing, May ends the Spring, And Summer dances on her tomb! —Philip Freneau

POETSorg: Thus, to repose, all Nature goes; Month after month must find its doom: Time on the wing, May ends the Spring, And Summer dances on her tomb! —Philip Freneau

Advaidism: ’Twixt Washington, Hyder, Don Galvez, De Grasse By my soul we brought to a very fine pass— When we’ve reason to hope new battles are won, A packet arrives—and an army’s undone!' -Philip Freneau (one of the national poets of America) 4/8

raisinghistory: My debut performance of Philip Freneau, Poet of the American Revolution for The Matawan Historical Society in celebrating Matawan's 350th Anniversary in 2011.

Iowcals: me writing an essay about the unfortunate life events Philip Freneau experienced: the hardships... he faced... me writing an essay about the revenge Montresor bestowed upon Fortunato: the ending is set in stone... therefore...

levi_line: The fictional Ethan and Joan meet many historical characters in addition to Duer and Hamilton, including frontier champion Hugh Henry Brackenridge, Jeffersonian journalist Philip Freneau, wealthy socialite Anne Bingham, Hamilton blackmailer James Reynolds, his seductive wife.

revise_retweet: My class and I discovered a connection between Philip Freneau’s “A Political Litany” and the episode of Spongebob where they picket the Krusty Krab. Obviously, we had to watch the Spongebob clip.

Book_Addict: Happy birthday to writer/poet/editor Philip Freneau (January 2,1752), author of the 1780 poem "The English Prison Ship" et al.

JoeBilby1: Today in New Jersey history, January 2: Philip Freneau, 2nd Battle of Trenton & Christian Sharps.

AndKnuckles_bot: The Poems of Philip Freneau, Poet of the American Revolution. Volume 2 (of 3) & Knuckles

RESullivanJr: OMG when Rep Nunes says Geo. Washington would have been impeached! GW was LIVID when it came 2 foreign intervention. See the Genet Affair, & America's 1st poet, Philip Freneau. Freneau was France-interested, a Genet-defender, the reason GW referred 2 him as a 'barking cur"!

IntegrityTeam1: But fame is theirs - and future days On pillar'd brass shall tell their praise; Shall tell - when cold neglect is dead - "These for their country fought and bled." ~Philip Freneau

gimmel65: But fame is theirs - and future days On pillar'd brass shall tell their praise; Shall tell - when cold neglect is dead - "These for their country fought and bled." ~Philip Freneau Thank you Veterans!

StevenPeterson8: Lots of us have feet of clay. TJ , as Sec of State, hired Philip Freneau with government funds to develop a publication to attack Washington's administration. Trump is no Jefferson, but TJ, as a sphinx, could be nasty and was no saint.

StevenPeterson8: 1/ Jefferson is fascinating. One biographer called him a sphinx. Cagey is okay, too. Best example. As Sec of State, he hired Philip Freneau with government funds to create and publish a paper attacking the Federalst administration (including Pres Washington). Cagey indeed!

CherylAnn_02: The homestead of Philip Freneau (Poet, Journalist, Revolutionary War) wasn’t quite as interesting as his gravesite, which was across the street from his house, up a flight of stone steps, through a wrought iron…

JeffPatterson11: Philip Freneau, America’s First Atheist Poet

ashleyrattner: I like when the Google app on my telephone is like "In case you missed it..." and then produces an overview of Philip Freneau's life

kadinhp: In a cabinet meeting, Thomas Jefferson records George Washington's unusually emotional response to personal attacks against him by Philip Freneau in the National Gazette newspaper, a newspaper Jefferson himself helped organize.

BluegumPilliga: Philip Freneau, America’s First Atheist Poet

edwereddie: Philip Freneau, America’s First Atheist Poet

lit_spoilers: “…the poet's voyage home from the West Indies, in June and July, 1778. END OF VOL. I”

LiteraryRob: Green seas shall only greet the eye, Those seas encircled by the sky, Immense and deep—come then with me And view the wonders of the sea... Early American poet Philip Freneau on John Paul Jones and his ship the 'Bon Homme Richard," August 14, 1779 --

bardonthehill: Song of Thyrsis by Philip Freneau

TenFleming: Prevailing view. “On the uniformity and perfection of nature." (Philip Freneau,1815).

samrat747: Song of Thyrsis by Philip Freneau THE turtle on yon withered bough, That lately mourned her murdered mate, Has foun...

samrat747: The Vernal Age by Philip Freneau WHERE the pheasant roosts at night, Lonely, drowsy, out of sight, Where the evenin...

samrat747: To A New England Poet by Philip Freneau Though skilled in Latin and in Greek, And earning fifty cents a week, Such...

samrat747: The Republican Genius of Europe by Philip Freneau Emporers and kings! in vain you strive Your torments to conceal--...

samrat747: On the Universality and Other Attributes of the God of Nature by Philip Freneau ALL that we see, about, abroad, Wha...

samrat747: Ode by Philip Freneau GOD save the Rights of Man! Give us a heart to scan Blessings so dear: Let them be spread aro...



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