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welfordwrites: Necrological, a poem by John Crowe Ransom. A reflection on life and death based on the aftermath of a medieval battle. Click the link!

MakeANoteOfThat: The curse of hell upon the sleek upstart That got the Captain finally on his back And took the red red vitals of his heart And made the kites to whet their beaks clack clack. —John Crowe Ransom

NotFsb: "Progress never defines its ultimate objective but thrusts its victims at once into an infinite series." ~John Crowe Ransom

PrawfBainbridge: 1/ If you've ever wondered why progressives are never satisfied, consider John Crowe Ransom's argument that "all the true progressivists intend to have a program so elastic that they can always propose new worlds to conquer. ....

welfordwrites: Bells for John Whiteside's Daughter, a poem by John Crowe Ransom. An unsentimental reaction to the death of a young child. Click the link!

christinam4ria: Few people know Cy Twombly as a photographer, but his ethereal, grainy polaroids of flowers in his Italian studio might be my favorite of his work. Like the John Crowe Ransom quote he loved: "The image cannot be dispossessed of a primordial freshness which ideas can never claim.”

EvanKutzler: Fifty two out of every 100 people living in Williamson County, Tennessee, were enslaved in 1860 – the third highest proportion of enslaved people in TN. It's no coincidence that John Crowe Ransom imagined establishing a newspaper there in 1930 for his white southern "fugitives."

welfordwrites: Necrological, a poem by John Crowe Ransom. A reflection on life and death based on the aftermath of a medieval battle. Click the link!

SamBuntz: "Practise your beauty, blue girls, before it fail; And I will cry with my loud lips and publish Beauty which all our powers shall never establish, It is so frail." - John Crowe Ransom

welfordwrites: Bells for John Whiteside's Daughter, a poem by John Crowe Ransom. An unsentimental reaction to the death of a young child. Click the link!

JakeOfOnline: 2. 20th century poet: John Crowe Ransom

Diatima2: "Great lovers lie in Hell, the stubborn ones Infatuate of the flesh upon the bones; Stuprate, they rend each other when they kiss, The pieces kiss again, no end to this." - John Crowe Ransom, The Equilibrists

DTCSwansea: When performing, Dylan read from other poets’ work as well as his own. He’d often write out the poem first to aid his interpretation of it; here’s his transcription of a John Crowe Ransom poem.

kalemkak: Poems about God (1919) - John Crowe Ransom

kalemkak: Two Gentlemen in Bonds (1927) - John Crowe Ransom

welfordwrites: Necrological, a poem by John Crowe Ransom. A reflection on life and death based on the aftermath of a medieval battle. Click the link!

12_Southerners: "Industrialism is rightfully a menial, of almost miraculous cunning but no intelligence" —John Crowe Ransom ("Reconstructed but Unregenerate")

kalemkak: Two Gentlemen in Bonds (1927) - John Crowe Ransom

kalemkak: Two Gentlemen in Bonds (1927) - John Crowe Ransom

kalemkak: Chills and Fever (1924) - John Crowe Ransom

kalemkak: Poems about God (1919) - John Crowe Ransom

cribbenMerrill: Joshua Hren on a story whose title John Crowe Ransom wanted O'Connor to sanitize: it "evinces how hard it is to obtain the right proportionality between what William Lynch calls “the definite”... and the “insights” that we can gain by passing through them"

kalemkak: Chills and Fever (1924) - John Crowe Ransom

kalemkak: Two Gentlemen in Bonds (1927) - John Crowe Ransom

kalemkak: Two Gentlemen in Bonds (1927) - John Crowe Ransom

kalemkak: Two Gentlemen in Bonds (1927) - John Crowe Ransom

welfordwrites: Bells for John Whiteside's Daughter, a poem by John Crowe Ransom. An unsentimental reaction to the death of a young child. Click the link!

JoyceCarolOates: so true! I love seeing May Swenson represented in anthologies, also Delmore Schwartz, Howard Nemerov, William Matthews, even James Dickey & John Crowe Ransom... poets who have fallen over the edge, & hover near oblivion.

D_Kuehn: New acquisition in my ongoing efforts to learn more about the economic thought of the Southern Agrarians: an until recently unpublished manuscript by John Crowe Ransom. I have no idea what to expect but have been surprised by the elaborateness of Agrarian economic ideas so far.

welfordwrites: Necrological, a poem by John Crowe Ransom. A reflection on life and death based on the aftermath of a medieval battle. Click the link!

masoodraja: John Crowe Ransom: Criticism Inc| Literary Theory| American New Criticis...

welfordwrites: Bells for John Whiteside's Daughter, a poem by John Crowe Ransom. An unsentimental reaction to the death of a young child. Click the link!

attic_culture: I sat in a friendly company And wagged my wicked tongue so well, My friends were listening close to hear The wickedest tales that I could tell.

attic_culture: She said a hateful little word Between the pages of the book. I bubbled with a noble rage, I bruised her with a dreadful look,

IVMiles: John Crowe Ransom, “Worship”

welfordwrites: Necrological, a poem by John Crowe Ransom. A reflection on life and death based on the aftermath of a medieval battle. Click the link!

Whitesides_Band: The upcoming single is an adaptation of John Crowe Ransom's famous poem that spawned our band name. Now available on our Bandcamp page.

JosephBottum: See John Crowe Ransom's poem "Dead Boy," where in "the little man quite dead," the poet sees "the forbears’ antique lineaments": "This was the old tree’s late branch wrenched away, Grieving the sapless limbs, the shorn and shaken."

hilozoist: "Perhaps I use a distasteful figure, but I have the idea that what we need is Criticism, Inc., or Criticism, Ltd." --John Crowe Ransom , Criticism, Inc. (1938)

newcriterion: From the archives: In his new anthology of essays, The Southern Critics, which features the likes of John Crowe Ransom, Allen Tate, and Robert Penn Warren, Glenn C. Arbery claims that the Southern Critics “have been neglected” and I agree.

AfterLetters: Her wars were bruited in our high window. We looked among orchard trees and beyond, Where she took arms against her shadow, Or harried unto the pond John Crowe Ransom Bells For John Whitesides' Daughter Renoir

pastelcathedral: today i learned that a bunch of john crowe ransom’s students were recruited by CIA agents in order to export new criticism to latin america and stifle revolutionary critique

original_spare: Thinking of pouring another cup of coffee just so I can read more about how John Crowe Ransom dunked on the prevailing pedagogical methods at Vanderbilt

welfordwrites: Bells for John Whiteside's Daughter, a poem by John Crowe Ransom. An unsentimental reaction to the death of a young child. Click the link!

AfterLetters: Tie the white fillets then about your lustrous hair And think no more of what will come to pass Than bluebirds that go walking on the grass And chattering on the air. John Crowe Ransom

SotoAlfred: August's poem is by John Crowe Ransom, for whom you should blame New Criticism, close reading, and Allen Tate, I guess

welfordwrites: Necrological, a poem by John Crowe Ransom. A reflection on life and death based on the aftermath of a medieval battle. Click the link!

LuenLozada: Two evils, monstrous either one apart Possessed me, and were long and loath at going: A cry of Absence, Absence, in the heart, And in the wood the furious winter blowing. — John Crowe Ransom (1888-1974) “Winter Remembered”

Danascene_: John Crowe Ransom, John Cheever, and other new critic types came pretty close to the archetype of conservatism in America.

widowdido: Must try to remember John Crowe Ransom comparing a poem to a Christmas tree once I'm talking about poetry in public again...

welfordwrites: Bells for John Whiteside's Daughter, a poem by John Crowe Ransom. An unsentimental reaction to the death of a young child. Click the link!

good_tweet_man: (incidentally Stonnor’s book has a whole chapter on john crowe ransom that still need to dig into)

welfordwrites: Necrological, a poem by John Crowe Ransom. A reflection on life and death based on the aftermath of a medieval battle. Click the link!

welfordwrites: Necrological, a poem by John Crowe Ransom. A reflection on life and death based on the aftermath of a medieval battle. Click the link!

WithArora: “Criticism, Inc.” by John Crowe Ransom discussed in Hindi

WithArora: “Criticism, Inc.” by John Crowe Ransom discussed in Hindi

allenmendenhall: On John Crowe Ransom’s Newly Discovered Agrarian Classic - Crisis Magazine

dada_ist: ( JOHN CROWE RANSOM POEM ) A boy not beautiful, nor good, nor clever, A black cloud full of storms too hot for keeping, A sword beneath his mother's heart—yet never Woman bewept her babe as this is weeping. ( SONICYOUTH " I love you golden blue " )

acrimonyand: It is out of fashion in these days to look backward rather than forward. About the only American given to it is some unreconstructed Southerner, who persists in his regard for a certain terrain, a certain history, and a certain inherited way of living. — John Crowe Ransom

welfordwrites: Necrological, a poem by John Crowe Ransom

HowardFricker: Check out this tweet from POETSorg: Where is your love by the mellow moon? —John Crowe Ransom

POETSorg: Where is your love by the mellow moon? —John Crowe Ransom

JDMurrah: "Nature wears out man before man can wear out nature." ~John Crowe Ransom

howtingmi: At the end of chap VIII, Prof. Kirk defines “Toryism” and mentions the “squirearchy.” John Crowe Ransom uses the same term in his contribution to ‘I’ll take my Stand.’ Was this term common? Did Prof. Kirk get it from Prof. Ransom?

RayBoomhower: "God have mercy on the sinner Who must write with no dinner, No gravy and no grub, No pewter and no pub, No belly and no bowels, Only consonants and vowels." John Crowe Ransom, born on this day in 1888

SSBrockville: John Crowe Ransom (b. April 30, 1888) he was a prize-winning poet and essayist and a founder of the New Criticism school. He was the first editor of the widely regarded Kenyon Review and a teacher and mentor to a generation of accomplished students.

SSBDupont: John Crowe Ransom (b. April 30, 1888) he was a prize-winning poet and essayist and a founder of the New Criticism school. He was the first editor of the widely regarded Kenyon Review and a teacher and mentor to a generation of accomplished students.

cowboycoleridge: The Lovers' Chronicle 30 April - Tell Me, verse by mac tag - art by Luigi Russolo - verse by John Crowe Ransom

NORTHTRENTON: And Happy Birthday to John Crowe Ransom (d. 1974), Harold Breen (d. 1966), Joachim Von Ribbentrop (d. 1946), Philippe Panneton (d. 1960), Reverend Gary Davis (d. 1972), Hans List (d. 1996) and Humberto Mauro (d. 1983).

chamiltonemery: Born on this day | John Crowe Ransom | Poet and founder of the New Criticism

ARTSalamode: Born 4/30: painter Francesco Primaticcio, sculptor Frederick Edward "F.E." McWilliam, wrtiers john Crowe Ransom, Larry Niven, jazz bass Percy Heath, singer/songwriters Bobby Vee, Amanda Palmer, Justin Vernon, director Lars von Trier.

ARTSalamode: "And how can poetry stand up against its new conditions? Its position is perfectly precarious." John Crowe Ransom

Book_Addict: Happy birthday to poet/writer/academic John Crowe Ransom (April 30, 1888), author of "Poems about God" (1919) et al.

BlueCrew86: But we moderns are impatient and destructive. - John Crowe Ransom

revmaddog3: 1888 John Crowe Ransom, American poet and critic (God Without Thunder), born in Pulaski, Tennessee (d. 1974) "April Treason" by John Crowe Ransom (read by Tom O'Bedlam)

BookPeopleRVA: It's the Birthday of John Crowe Ransom.

JohnPresnall: I also read Doctorow because I learned he studied with John Crowe Ransom at Kenyon, and because, like Robert Penn Warren, he wrote episodic novels of American history, tying personal and public with larger philosophical themes of America. /6

welfordwrites: Necrological, a poem by John Crowe Ransom

BLCKDGRD: On the Fugitives - it's been twenty years since I read Allen Tate or Robert Penn Warren or John Crowe Ransom, etc (I only read Warren a LOT of the lot)

InadeBree: ‘Practice your beauty, blue girls, before it fail; And I will cry with my loud lips and publish beauty ...’ — John Crowe Ransom | Frederick Carl Frieseke Girl in Blue, 1915

welfordwrites: Necrological, a poem by John Crowe Ransom

BookRarities: 1941 book first edition THE NEW CRITICISM by JOHN CROWE RANSOM first printing/dj

FatBoi843: It emphasized close reading particularly of poetry to discover how a work of literature functioned as a self contained self referential aesthetic object the movement derived it's name from John Crowe Ransom's 1941 Book The New Criticism

welfordwrites: Necrological, a poem by John Crowe Ransom

thedarkhorsemag: John Crowe Ransom, first UK edition of the Selected Poems. A poet as distinctive as George Mackay Brown. Ransom was an influence on early Plath (& Hughes), particularly noticeable in a poem like ‘Spinster’ in *The Colossus and other poems*.

Whitesides_Band: We are working on new tunes and hope to release a 7" EP later this year. The lead track will be an adaptation of John Crowe Ransom's poem "Bells for John Whiteside's Daughter"--the poem that spawned our name. We'll keep you posted.

welfordwrites: Necrological, a poem by John Crowe Ransom

AfterLetters: Tie the white fillets then about your lustrous hair And think no more of what will come to pass - John Crowe Ransom

acrimonyand: It is the European intention to live materially along the inherited line of least resistance, in order to put the surplus of energy into the free life of the mind. — John Crowe Ransom

Zarathanarchy: John Crowe Ransom, southern agrarian poetry movement, 1920s.

ArchieG1946: John Crowe Ransom in 1958, already sensing the problem with the search for literary “relevance” and the turn from the canon. An inevitable effect of mass culture perhaps.

welfordwrites: Necrological, a poem by John Crowe Ransom

tonyplcc: “...Go listen to your teachers old and contrary, Without believing a word... And think no more of what will come to pass... Practise your beauty...It is so frail...yet it is not long...Since she was lovelier than any of you” Extracts from Blue Girls by John Crowe Ransom

welfordwrites: Necrological, a poem by John Crowe Ransom

wrathofgnon: "Modernism is skepticism and disillusionment, and ends in despair." — John Crowe Ransom (1888-1974), 1935

wrathofgnon: John Crowe Ransom, on the importance and humbling character of tragedy, a genre that is effectively banished today.

PoetryTrain: Bells For John Whiteside’s Daughter poem by John Crowe Ransom

PoetryTrain: "Captain Carpenter" by John Crowe Ransom (read by Tom O'Bedlam)

PoetryTrain: Maxime Wegman - "Piazza Piece" by John Crowe Ransom

PoetryTrain: "Dead Boy" by John Crowe Ransom (read by Tom O'Bedlam)



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Poem of the day

Carl Sandburg Poem
House
 by Carl Sandburg

TWO Swede families live downstairs and an Irish policeman upstairs, and an old soldier, Uncle Joe.
Two Swede boys go upstairs and see Joe. His wife is dead, his only son is dead, and his two daughters in Missouri and Texas don't want him around.
The boys and Uncle Joe crack walnuts with a hammer on the bottom of a flatiron while the January wind howls and the zero air weaves laces on the window glass.
Joe tells the Swede boys all about Chickamauga and Chattanooga, how the Union soldiers crept in rain somewhere a dark night and ran forward and killed many Rebels, took flags, held a hill, and won a victory told about in the histories in school.
Joe takes a piece of carpenter's chalk, draws lines on the floor and piles stove wood to show where six regiments were slaughtered climbing a slope.
'Here they went' and 'Here they went,' says Joe, and the January wind howls and the zero air weaves laces on the window glass.
The two Swede boys go downstairs with a big blur of guns, men, and hills in their heads. They eat herring and potatoes and tell the family war is a wonder and soldiers are a wonder.
One breaks out with a cry at supper: I wish we had a war now and I could be a soldier.
...

Read complete poem

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