Tale Ii Poem Rhyme Scheme and Analysis

Rhyme Scheme: A BBCCDDEEFFGGHHIIIJJK KL MMIINNOOIIPPQQJJDDII MMMMMMRRMMSTUUMMVVWX WMMYYOOMMMMZZA2B2MMM M OOMMM MMG M GC2C2MMM OOPPD2D2MMMMGGA2B2MM E2E2XXGGF2F2WWIIMMMM G2 F2CCH2H2MMI2I2J2J2MM OOMM MBBK2K2L2L2 C2M2M2N2N2MMB O2O2MMP2P2F2F2MMQ2Q2 MMMM

THE PARTING HOURA
-
Minutely trace man's life year after yearB
Through all his days let all his deeds appearB
And then though some may in that life be strangeC
Yet there appears no vast nor sudden changeC
The links that bind those various deeds are seenD
And no mysterious void is left betweenD
But let these binding links be all destroyedE
All that through years he suffer'd or enjoy'dE
Let that vast gap be made and then beholdF
This was the youth and he is thus when oldF
Then we at once the work of time surveyG
And in an instant see a life's decayG
Pain mix'd with pity in our bosoms riseH
And sorrow takes new sadness from surpriseH
Beneath yon tree observe an ancient pairI
A sleeping man a woman in her chairI
Watching his looks with kind and pensive airI
Nor wife nor sister she nor is the nameJ
Nor kindred of this friendly pair the sameJ
Yet so allied are they that few can feelK
Her constant warm unwearied anxious zealK
Their years and woes although they long haveL
-
lovedM
Keep their good name and conduct unreprovedM
Thus life's small comforts they together shareI
And while life lingers for the grave prepareI
No other subjects on their spirits pressN
Nor gain such int'rest as the past distressN
Grievous events that from the mem'ry driveO
Life's common cares and those alone surviveO
Mix with each thought in every action shareI
Darken each dream and blend with every prayerI
To David Booth his fourth and last born boyP
Allen his name was more than common joyP
And as the child grew up there seem'd in himQ
A more than common life in every limbQ
A strong and handsome stripling he becameJ
And the gay spirit answer'd to the frameJ
A lighter happier lad was never seenD
For ever easy cheerful or sereneD
His early love he fix'd upon a fairI
And gentle maid they were a handsome pairI
They at an infant school together play'dM
Where the foundation of their love was laidM
The boyish champion would his choice attendM
In every sport in every fray defendM
As prospects open'd and as life advancedM
They walk'd together they together dancedM
On all occasions from their early yearsR
They mix'd their joys and sorrows hopes and fearsR
Each heart was anxious till it could impartM
Its daily feelings to its kindred heartM
As years increased unnumber'd petty warsS
Broke out between them jealousies and jarsT
Causeless indeed and follow'd by a peaceU
That gave to love growth vigour and increaseU
Whilst yet a boy when other minds are voidM
Domestic thoughts young Alien's hours employ'dM
Judith in gaining hearts had no concernV
Rather intent the matron's part to learnV
Thus early prudent and sedate they grewW
While lovers thoughtful and though childrenX
-
trueW
To either parents not a day appeardM
When with this love they might have interferedM
Childish at first they cared not to restrainY
And strong at last they saw restriction vainY
Nor knew they when that passion to reproveO
Now idle fondness now resistless loveO
So while the waters rise the children treadM
On the broad estuary's sandy bedM
But soon the channel fills from side to sideM
Comes danger rolling with the deep'ning tideM
Yet none who saw the rapid current flowZ
Could the first instant of that danger knowZ
The lovers waited till the time should comeA2
When they together could possess a homeB2
In either house were men and maids unwedM
Hopes to be soothed and tempers to be ledM
Then Allen's mother of his favourite maidM
Spoke from the feelings of a mind afraidM
'Dress and amusements were her sole employ '-
She said 'entangling her deluded boy '-
And yet in truth a mother's jealous loveO
Had much imagined and could little proveO
Judith had beauty and if vain was kindM
Discreet and mild and had a serious mindM
Dull was their prospect When the lovers metM
They said 'We must not dare not venture yet '-
'Oh could I labour for thee ' Allen criedM
'Why should our friends be thus dissatisfiedM
On my own arm I could depend but theyG
Still urge obedience must I yet obey '-
Poor Judith felt the grief but grieving begg'dM
-
delayG
At length a prospect came that seem'd to smileC2
And faintly woo them from a Western IsleC2
A kinsman there a widow's hand had gain'dM
'Was old was rich and childless yet remain'dM
Would some young Booth to his affairs attendM
And wait awhile he might expect a friend '-
The elder brothers who were not in loveO
Fear'd the false seas unwilling to removeO
But the young Allen an enamour'd boyP
Eager an independence to enjoyP
Would through all perils seek it by the seaD2
Through labour danger pain or slaveryD2
The faithful Judith his design approvedM
For both were sanguine they were young and lovedM
The mother's slow consent was then obtain'dM
The time arrived to part alone remain'dM
All things prepared on the expected dayG
Was seen the vessel anchor'd in the bayG
From her would seamen in the evening comeA2
To take th' adventurous Allen from his homeB2
With his own friends the final day he pass'dM
And every painful hour except the lastM
The grieving father urged the cheerful glassE2
To make the moments with less sorrow passE2
Intent the mother look'd upon her sonX
And wish'd th' assent withdrawn the deed undoneX
The younger sister as he took his wayG
Hung on his coat and begg'd for more delayG
But his own Judith call'd him to the shoreF2
Whom he must meet for they might meet no moreF2
And there he found her faithful mournful trueW
Weeping and waiting for a last adieuW
The ebbing tide had left the sand and thereI
Moved with slow steps the melancholy pairI
Sweet were the painful moments but how sweetM
And without pain when they again should meetM
Now either spoke as hope and fear impress'dM
Each their alternate triumph in the breastM
Distance alarm'd the maid she cried ''Tis farG2
-
'-
And danger too 'it is a time of warF2
Then in those countries are diseases strangeC
And women gay and men are prone to changeC
What then may happen in a year when thingsH2
Of vast importance every moment bringsH2
But hark an oar ' she cried yet none appear'dM
'Twas love's mistake who fancied what it fear'dM
And she continued 'Do my Allen keepI2
Thy heart from evil let thy passions sleepI2
Believe it good nay glorious to prevailJ2
And stand in safety where so many failJ2
And do not Allen or for shame or prideM
Thy faith abjure or thy profession hideM
Can I believe his love will lasting proveO
Who has no rev'rence for the God I loveO
I know thee well how good thou art and kindM
But strong the passions that invade thy mindM
Now what to me hath Allen to commend '-
'Upon my mother ' said the youth ' attendM
Forget her spleen and in my place appearB
Her love to me will make my Judith dearB
Oft I shall think such comforts lovers seekK2
Who speaks of me and fancy what they speakK2
Then write on all occasions always dwellL2
On hope's fair prospects and be kind and wellL2
And ever choose the fondest tenderest style '-
She answer'd 'No ' but answer'd with a smileC2
'And now my Judith at so sad a timeM2
Forgive my fear and call it not my crimeM2
When with our youthful neighbours 'tis thy chanceN2
To meet in walks the visit or the danceN2
When every lad would on my lass attendM
Choose not a smooth designer for a friendM
That fawning Philip nay be not severeB
A rival's hope must cause a lover's fear '-
Displeased she felt and might in her replyO2
Have mix'd some anger but the boat was nighO2
Now truly heard it soon was full in sightM
Now the sad farewell and the long good nightM
For see his friends come hast'ning to the beachP2
And now the gunwale is within the reachP2
'Adieu farewell remember ' and what moreF2
Affection taught was utter'd from the shoreF2
But Judith left them with a heavy heartM
Took a last view and went to weep apartM
And now his friends went slowly from the placeQ2
Where she stood still the dashing oar to traceQ2
Till all were silent for the youth she pray'dM
And softly then return'd the weeping maidM
They parted thus by hope and fortune ledM
AndM

George Crabbe



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