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guardianstage: The Dame and the Showgirl review – when Edith Sitwell met Marilyn Monroe

StagePlayerPlus: The Dame and the Showgirl review – when Edith Sitwell met Marilyn Monroe

AhmadNorMaulana: The Dame and the Showgirl review – when Edith Sitwell met Marilyn Monroe

guardianstage: The Dame and the Showgirl review – when Edith Sitwell met Marilyn Monroe

ignacioalperin: The Dame and the Showgirl review – when Edith Sitwell met Marilyn Monroe

MichaelJohnLa11: The Dame and the Showgirl review – when Edith Sitwell met Marilyn Monroe

MichaelJohnLan6: The Dame and the Showgirl review – when Edith Sitwell met Marilyn Monroe

theactorshow: Stage/Theatre News: The Dame and the Showgirl review – when Edith Sitwell met Marilyn Monroe: Audible Emma Thompson plays the poet and Sinead Matthews is the breathy movie star in Simon Berry’s compelling audio play Truman Capote called Sunset Tower, an…

guardian: The Dame and the Showgirl review – when Edith Sitwell met Marilyn Monroe

BlakenianSoul: Dame Edith Sitwell - Face to Face Interview 1959

AirMailWeekly: When an eccentric, aristocratic English poet and a glamorous American film star were brought together by a magazine, editors hoped for a clash. But Dame Edith Sitwell and Marilyn Monroe got along famously.

AirMailWeekly: When an eccentric, aristocratic English poet and a glamorous American film star were brought together by a magazine, editors hoped for a clash. But Dame Edith Sitwell and Marilyn Monroe got along famously.

JPJaval: Tilda Swinton as Dame Edith Sitwell / W Magazine / 2018

DeryckSolomon: After Dame Edith Sitwell and Marilyn Monroe talking about Freud, Huxley and martinis beneath Picasso’s portrait of Marie-Thérèse Walter and Mondrian’s Composition No 11 in Los Angeles in 1953

DeryckSolomon: After Dame Edith Sitwell and Marilyn Monroe talking about makeup and boys beneath Picasso’s portrait of Marie-Thérèse Walter and Mondrian’s Composition No 11 in Los Angeles in 1953

indiscrimnate: Edgar Breau doing Dame Edith Sitwell.

diaz_pesantes: Dame Edith Sitwell - Face to Face Interview 1959

sheypeters: The aim of flattery is to soothe and encourage us by assuring us of the truth of an opinion we have already formed about ourselves. ~ Dame Edith Sitwell

AnecdotalWisdom: In 1954 poet Edith Sitwell was given the title Dame of the British Empire. On a visit to the United States an American came up to her and said rather aggressively, “Why do you call yourself ‘Dame’?” “I don’t,” she replied. “The queen does.”

EyesofCC: Dame Edith Sitwell - Face to Face Interview 1959

PGDePinto: Dame Edith Sitwell - Face to Face Interview 1959

mamewhit: Dame Edith Sitwell reads Still Falls the Rain

EstherUK1: Dame Edith Sitwell - Face to Face Interview 1959

DeweyBreen: "Oh I sit and wait for inspiration, yes, of course, one is obliged to do that..." - Dame Edith Sitwell

medicilegacy: Dame Edith Sitwell - Face to Face Interview 1959

WinterlightHome: TIL about Dame Edith Sitwell, and I am fascinated.

iroonhome: English poet Dame Edith Sitwell 1959 Interview

SagebrushSeren1: “As for the usefulness of poetry, its uses are many. It is the deification of reality. It should make our days holy to us. The poet should speak to all men, for a moment, of that other life of theirs that they have smothered and forgotten.” Dame Edith Sitwell

VictorOlliver: Dame Edith Sitwell. A queer old bag, full of shit.

mikewarburton: MARILYN MONROE & DAME EDITH SITWELL - HOLLYWOOD (1953) by George Silk

SChecinska: Dame Edith Sitwell - Face to Face Interview 1959

historydailypix: English poet/critic Dame Edith Sitwell meeting with Marilyn Monroe in Hollywood, 1956.

aflashbak: Dame Edith Sitwell and Marilyn Monroe, 1956

DHBJones: Pleased to say that literary doyenne the late Dame Edith Sitwell has agreed to draw the winning name, and has also graciously lent me her hat. She's rummaging in the hat...

MichaelLoris5: "I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it." ~ English poet and critic, Dame Edith Sitwell (1887 - 1964)

mkimdorman: When asked about her personal hobbies, Dame Edith Sitwell replied: "Reading, listening to music, and silence."

Dementia_Grimm: Dame Edith Sitwell is always a complete mood.

aflashbak: Dame Edith Sitwell and Marilyn Monroe, 1956

rinmor: “I am patient with stupidity, but not with those proud of it” Dame Edith Sitwell

MrSavileRow: When we think of cruelty, we must try to remember the stupidity, the envy, the frustration from which it has arisen. - Dame Edith Sitwell

Broughton500: Magnificent interview with Dame Edith Sitwell - Face to Face 1959

fracturedretic1: “ Beneath the flat and paper sky The sun, a demon’s eye, Glowed through the air, that mask of glass; ...” Clowns Houses ~ Dame Edith Sitwell

Jaq__W: In the course of his ninety-three years he met everyone: Jean Cocteau, Dame Edith Sitwell, Paul Bowles, Salvador Dali, Patti Smith, Andy Warhol, Robert Mapplethorpe. Here's an interview he did with Bomb Magazine in 1986

dire_distress: "I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it." - Dame Edith Sitwell

OMGVDH: Dame Edith Sitwell by Cecil Beaton

BlakenianSoul: Dame Edith Sitwell Talking About Marilyn Monroe In 1959

Jasonwaddle4: Sitwell looked at the writing of poetry to be a form of religion. This is an interesting answer to a question I had yesterday...thank you, Dame Edith Sitwell.

witterton: "I am a walking fire. I am all leaves....." Dame Edith Sitwell

mamyx: (photo by mattthew kim amyx - 12.27.16) “I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it.” ~ Dame Edith Louisa Sitwell DBE

Tate: 'Winter is the time for comfort, for good food and warmth, for the touch of a friendly hand and for a talk beside the fire: it is the time for home.' - Edith Sitwell Alvaro Guevara's portrait of Dame Edith Sitwell 1916.

Dark4eyes: “I am patient with stupidity, but not with those who are proud of it.” ~Dame Edith Sitwell (1887-1964)

DickDixxx: What's happening is December 9th - not the most distinguished date of the calendar; yet Clarence Birdseye, frozen food magnate, was born then in 1886. Also let us not forget that Judi Dench was born on this day in 1934. Exactly 30 years later, Dame Edith Sitwell sadly died.

dylanthomasnews: Today we remember Dame Edith Sitwell, poet, who died on December 9 1964 An enthusiastic advocate of Dylan Thomas's poetry Portrait by Cecil Beaton

ShrirakshaKumb2: “Winter is the time for comfort, for good food and warmth, for the touch of a friendly hand and for a talk beside the fire : it is the time for home ” Dame Edith sitwell

CAROUSELGRAVE: one day tim curry & michael kamen sat down and said “Let’s write the first verse of this song about Dame Edith Louisa Sitwell DBE, a British poet & critic & the eldest of the three literary Sitwells, the other two being Osbert and Sacheverell Sitwell” and i think that’s beautiful

dldowling: 'Virginia Woolf's writing is no more than glamorous knitting. I believe she must have a pattern somewhere.' Dame Edith Sitwell... about Virginia Woolf

walterm: The 1962 portraits of Dame Edith Sitwell by Sir Cecil Beaton

ahistoryinart: 'Dame Edith Sitwell.' Álvaro Guevara Reimers was loosely associated with the Bloomsbury set of artists and writers. He once sparred with Lytton Strachey and cut his chin after an argument of who had the best recipe for lemonade. A snapshot of class and rebellion.

AnecdotalWisdom: In 1954 poet Edith Sitwell was given the title Dame of the British Empire. On a visit to the United States an American came up to her and said rather aggressively, “Why do you call yourself ‘Dame’?” “I don’t,” she replied. “The queen does.”

Vol_de_Nuit_333: Dame Edith Sitwell

OakesSherman: The Pyramids, Hamilton's New York and Dame Edith Si

Elbies1: Check out this item in my Etsy shop

AnecdotalWisdom: In 1954 poet Edith Sitwell was given the title Dame of the British Empire. On a visit to the United States an American came up to her and said rather aggressively, “Why do you call yourself ‘Dame’?” “I don’t,” she replied. “The queen does.”

OWsGazv7gS81Sin: Dame Edith Sitwell Talking AboutMarilyn Monroe In 1959

schoensteiner: Dame Edith Sitwell Talking About Marilyn Monroe In 1959

schoensteiner: Dame Edith Sitwell - Face to Face Interview 1959

TheRealSPA: watch this: Dame Edith Sitwell Talking About Marilyn Monroe In 1959

MacCocktail: “My personal hobbies are reading, listening to music, and silence.” ― Dame Edith Sitwell (born September 7, 1887)

MacCocktail: "I'm patient with stupidity, but not with those who are proud of it." ― Dame Edith Sitwell (born this day, September 7, 1887)

TracyEMcDermott: 'More powerful than all dust. Once I was hercules Or Samson, strong as the pillars of the seas: But the flames of the heart Consumed me, and the mind Is but a foolish wind.' ― Dame Edith Sitwell

RSLiterature: 'More powerful than all dust. Once I was hercules Or Samson, strong as the pillars of the seas: But the flames of the heart Consumed me, and the mind Is but a foolish wind.' ― RSL Companion of Literature, Dame Edith Sitwell BOTD in 1887

jmc_fire: Edith Sitwell in Scarborough. Very enjoyable. Glenda Jackson makes a fine Dame Edith Sitwell the play transcends its biodrama status by its portrait of a consciousness confronting its past.

ChinnyHonk: Is Shane Warne still going out with Dame Edith Sitwell?

JSJdarling: Iconic noses, iconic style: Irene Sharaff, Isak Dinesen, Dame Edith Sitwell, and Louise Nevelson. I swoon

MotleyHippie: Just found Dame Edith Sitwell on BBC i-player, on a Face to Face interview. Fascinating lady. I've always been interested in her, since working for her nephew as a youngster. He gave me a book of her poetry. Told me amazing stories of his unusual family.

MichaelLoris5: Annie Ross and Cleo Laine made this superb recording in 1967 reciting the poetry of the magnificent Dame Edith Sitwell with musical arrangements by William Walton.

RobertGarnham: Today's whimsical daily poem podcast is an everyday tale about catching a train in which all the other passengers look like Dame Edith Sitwell.

FadedBleuJeans: Don't you agree that a rainy summer Sunday in July during a global pandemic is as good a time as any to watch Dame Edith Sitwell interviews ~

FadedBleuJeans: "My personal hobbies are reading, listening to music, and silence." Edith Sitwell as quoted in Reader's Digest Vol. 111, No. 666, (October 1977) To that I say "Same, Dame Edith, same!

Nisaccom: Imagine being startled in Dillons (now Waterstones) on Gower St by Edith Sitwell giving an impromptu reading of The Bat. '...Heliogabalusene the Bat In his furred cloak hang head down from the flat Wall, cling to what is convenient, Lenient ...'

MichaelLoris5: Dame Edith Sitwell was pure Heaven.

MichaelLoris5: "I am not eccentric. It's just that I am more alive than most people. I am an unpopular electric eel set in a pond of catfish." ~ English writer and poetess, Dame Edith Sitwell (1887 - 1964)

GuilorJohn: Dame Edith Sitwell interviewed in 1959. Amazing woman and the most amazing interview you will probably ever see/hear.

russell_kane: Sit down. Make a cup of tea. And watch this. Funny, and like touching a bit of history I didn't know we could touch, through the screen I mean.

NofeYOLibrary: The wooden Pegasus by Dame Edith Sitwell

GDCinteriors: Writing to Cecil Beaton, Edith Sitwell commented: “It is such a comfort not to appear as a cross between a turkey that has been insufficiently fattened up for Christmas and an escapee from Broadmoor.”⠀

TheMindofAlly: “Still falls the Rain— Dark as the world of man, black as our loss— Blind as the nineteen hundred and forty nails Upon the Cross” - Dame Edith Sitwell, 1940. I have received confused calls from friends, some crying…

maverickcalgary: Dame Edith Sitwell: "I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it."

olivier_gabet: Dame Edith Sitwell - Cecil Beaton 1962

AodhBC: "There is nothing on God's earth lower than a baronet." Lady Ida Emily Augusta Sitwell, mother of Dame Edith Sitwell, taunting her husband Sir George Sitwell, Bart.

Locolde: Dame Edith Sitwell - Face to Face Interview 1959

thisinhaste: Language: Shakespeare; Visuals: Priestley; Color Palette: Constable; Degree of Portent: Dame Edith Sitwell

kevblue777: In the great gardens, after bright spring rain, We find sweet innocence come once again, White periwinkles, little pensionnaires With muslin gowns and shy and candid airs. –Dame Edith Sitwell (1887–1964)

OccultFan: In the great gardens, after bright spring rain, We find sweet innocence come once again, White periwinkles, little pensionnaires With muslin gowns and shy and candid airs. –Dame Edith Sitwell (1887–1964)

PottageTaster: YOU WANNA WAR? YOURE OLD YOU GO YOU WANNA FIGHT? YOU SUCK YOU BLOW -Dame Edith Sitwell

MichaelLoris5: "Why not be oneself? That is the whole secret of a successful appearance. If one is a greyhound, why try to look like a Pekingese?" ~ English poet and critic, Dame Edith Sitwell (1887 - 1964)

MichaelLoris5: "I am not eccentric. It's just that I am more alive than most people. I am an unpopular electric eel set in a pond of catfish." ~ English poet and critic, Dame Edith Sitwell (1887 - 1964)

JPJaval: Somebody make a biopic of Dame Edith Sitwell starring Tilda Swinton you cowards!

davidjones2804: Dame Edith Sitwell always went for Hotel California on her karaoke nights out

SuettPauline: Listened to Dame Edith Sitwell talking about Marilyn yesterday, lovely to hear........



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All the years, as now.
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