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b3ckybr0wn: Lovely little bit of Bryher - here in Kaye Webb’s Peacock edition for Penguin, published in 1964, ten years after the first ed. Was drawn in by the introduction (‘a masterpiece’ says Dame Edith Sitwell[!]) but stayed for the nature writing rather than the Saxons and Danes

QueeredR: "I am not eccentric. It's just that I am more alive than most people. I am an unpopular electric eel set in a pond of goldfish." ~ Dame Edith Sitwell, (1887-1964), British poet and critic and the eldest of the three literary Sitwells

Andr6wMale: I wrote about the brilliant American writer James Purdy, whose strange hallucinatory books foresaw the madness of Trump's America. His ashes will be interred next to Dame Edith Sitwell's grave on Wednesday.

QueeredR: 7) "I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it." ~ Dame Edith Sitwell, (1887-1964), British Poet, Critic and delightful Eccentric (as much as she insisted she was not an Eccentric)

dean_frey: "I have a great feeling of gratitude. The Mirror published my first poem - in 1913 - when no other paper or publisher would have anything to do with my work." - Edith Sitwell This goodwill towards her paper allowed Doreen Spooner to take this amazing shot of Dame Edith, in 1962.

globalmuseum: Enter the wacky and fantastic world of Dame Edith Sitwell | Poet, critic, biographer and member of an extraordinary family | The Johnston Collection | Wednesday 22 Feb 2023, 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

alexconnorwrite: “I never attack unless I have been attacked first, and then Heaven have mercy upon the attacker! I sharpen my wits on a wooden head as a cat sharpens its claws on the wood legs of a table.” Dame Edith Sitwell DBE (1887 – 1964) British poet, part of the Sitwell literary clan.

Zoran54873135: New artwork for sale! - "Dame Edith Sitwell" -

zarandillo: SITWELL, Dame EDITH (1887-1964, poet and critic) [1950] PORTRAIT BY GEORGE PLATT LYNES (1907-1955) Stella Bowen said that Edith Sitwell was like 'a high altar on the move.'

sergioandreola: Dame Edith Sitwell by Cecil Beaton, 1927.

TammyWa81989105: Poet Dame Edith Sitwell Recalls Meeting Marilyn

RobertGarnham: Poem in the style of Dame Edith Sitwell

RobertGarnham: Poem in the style of Dame Edith Sitwell

CafeMuscato: In memory, she was kitted out in loud plaids, black patent leather, and feathers, and she looked both like no one else on earth and very much like Dame Edith Sitwell in a red wig. RIP a legend.

TheFuc: "I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it." - Dame Edith Louisa Sitwell (September 7, 1887 – December 9, 1964)

rojochajari: Dame Edith Sitwell reading a sequence of poems (1959)

PetloverHermine: 09Dec/1964: English poet Dame Edith Sitwell dies at St Thomas’ Hospital in Lambeth, London, England. She has battled Marfan syndrome throughout her life and has been confined to a wheelchair for several years. She’s 77

wimbasena: a little poem, Clowns' Houses by Dame Edith Louisa Sitwell, DBE

haIfacreofash: CYSTW updated.

JackKav08431165: British Fashion Awards: Tilda Swinton wows in a blue cape dress

AnecdotalWisdom: In 1954 poet Edith Sitwell was given the title Dame of the British Empire. On a visit to the United States an American came up to her and said rather aggressively, “Why do you call yourself ‘Dame’?” “I don’t,” she replied. “The queen does.”

MichaelLoris5: "I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it." ~ English poet and critic, Dame Edith Sitwell (1887 - 1964)

storyverse_xyz: ⚰️⚰️⚰️ FUN FACT ⚰️⚰️⚰️ Dame Edith Sitwell would allegedly lie in a coffin before writing. Moral of the story: Do what you must to get writing!

Worthies: Dame Edith Sitwell's birthday so thought I would read 'Sir Beelzebub'. "Blue as the gendarmerie were the waves of the sea, (Rocking and shocking the barmaid)." One wants to read on.... Happy Birthday.

stockdiva02: I'm patient with stupidity, but not with those who are proud of it. ― Dame Edith Sitwell

QueeredR: Dame Edith Sitwell said it so well . . . why would I try to say it with any more terse clarity?

MichaelLoris5: "I am not eccentric. It's just that I am more alive than most people. I am an unpopular electric eel set in a pond of catfish." ~ English poet and critic, Dame Edith Sitwell (1887 - 1964)

QueeredR: "When we think of cruelty, we must try to remember the stupidity, the envy, the frustration from which it has arisen." ~ Dame Edith Sitwell, (1887-1964), British poet & critic, the eldest of the three literary Sitwells...

MacCocktail: “My personal hobbies are reading, listening to music, and silence.” ― Dame Edith Sitwell (born September 7, 1887)

AllenCMarshall: September 7th Happy Birthday to Jean-Yves Thibaudet, Grandma Moses, Dame Edith Sitwell, Sonny Rollins, and Sinclair Lewis!

MacCocktail: "I'm patient with stupidity, but not with those who are proud of it." ― Dame Edith Sitwell (born this day, September 7, 1887)

NathanFrancis__: Poems:

ingo_don: — Dame Edith L. Sitwell (7/9/1887-9/12/1964) British poet, critic, oldest of the 3 literary Sitwells. She rejected her eccentric, loveless parents, for to live with her governess. She never married, but had a passionate relationship with Russian painter Pavel Tchelitchew. —

ModernLibrary: Dame Edith Sitwell (l.), born September 7, 1887. "The public will believe anything, so long as it is not founded on truth."

DailyKosTrends: “The poet speaks to all men of that other life of theirs that they have smothered and forgotten.” – Dame Edith Sitwell Welcome to Morning Open Thread, a daily post with a MOTley crew of hosts who choose the topic for the day's posting. We support our c…

LilianeBreuning: "Originality requires the aptitude for exile." — Jane Hirshfield - ‘The Question of Originality’ Dame Edith Sitwell photographed by Cecil Beaton in 1962

3QD: Dame Edith Sitwell – Face to Face Interview 1959

DavidJWhetstone: I think I should have liked having Dame Edith Sitwell living up my street

BelfastBeatnik: Dame Edith Sitwell being interviewed in 1959. An inspirational poet. I want to be her when I grow up.

BelfastBeatnik: Dame Edith Sitwell being interviewed in 1959. An inspirational poet. I want to be her when I grow up.

MichaelLoris5: "I am not eccentric. It's just that I am more alive than most people. I am an unpopular electric eel set in a pond of catfish." ~ English poet and critic, Dame Edith Sitwell (1887 - 1964)

johnevigar: Thursday’s delight. Hands on the grave of Dame Edith Sitwell at Weedon Lois, Northamptonshire

Julie80Ann: Omg I become obsessed with certain people now it’s that dame edith sitwell. Just bought her autobiography.

Julie80Ann: Dame Edith Sitwell - Face to Face Interview 1959

ernieschell: Dame Edith Sitwell had angular features resembling and she stood 6 feet tall. She often dressed in an unusual manner with gowns of brocade or velvet, with gold turbans and many rings; her jewelry is now in the jewelry galleries of the V&A Museum in London.

spac3craf: entertaining... also.. she seems to have known a bunch of early 20th gay poets & artists i'd never heard of (Siegfried Sassoon, Stephen Tennant, Pavel Tchelitchew) ~~~ Dame Edith Sitwell - Face to Face Interview 1959

Powell_DA: Sorry I didn't tag this right. The other person on the sofa with Dame Edith Sitwell is Marilyn Monroe.

JupiterSpurlock: British poet and critic Dame Edith Sitwell with Marilyn Monroe in 1953.

JGrissomNYC: Marilyn Monroe and Dame Edith Sitwell, 1953.

platospupil: In the great gardens, after bright spring rain, We find sweet innocence come once again, White periwinkles, little pensionnaires With muslin gowns and shy and candid airs. –Dame Edith Sitwell (1887–1964)

kevblue777: In the great gardens, after bright spring rain, We find sweet innocence come once again, White periwinkles, little pensionnaires With muslin gowns and shy and candid airs. –Dame Edith Sitwell (1887–1964)

Michael16557392: In the great gardens, after bright spring rain, We find sweet innocence come once again, White periwinkles, little pensionnaires With muslin gowns and shy and candid airs. –Dame Edith Sitwell (1887–1964)

mbharrington501: In the great gardens, after bright spring rain, We find sweet innocence come once again, White periwinkles, little pensionnaires With muslin gowns and shy and candid airs. –Dame Edith Sitwell (1887–1964)

BojanSokocanin: Marilyn Monroe and Dame Edith Sitwell, 1953.

jondmaas: Dame Edith Sitwell, 1956 Photo: Cecil Beaton

RobertGarnham: (Now here are two things you weren’t expecting in the same sentence): I’ve uploaded a video to my Tiktok account of a new poem inspired by Dame Edith Sitwell.

TheGoodbyeBaby: If one is a greyhound, why try to look like a Pekingese? — Dame Edith Sitwell

TheCIMF: Featuring Andrew Goodwin, Lukas Krupinski, Kristian Winther, Jason Noble, Sally Walker, Flora Carbo, Ruben Palma, Naoto Segawa, with Jonathan Biggins as Dame Edith Sitwell.

QueeredR: Dame Edith Sitwell, (1887-1964), was an English Poet & Critic who insisted she wasn't "eccentric" like her parents with whom she refused to live. Instead, she became one of England's most delightfully creative eccentrics, unlike her nasty parents.

lemon2sang: Benjamin Britten, Serenade for Tenor, Horn & Strings William Walton, Façade The Boyd Neel String Orchestra, English Opera Group Ensemble / Benjamin Britten / Anthony Collins / Peter Pears / Dennis Brain / Dame Edith Sitwell

GylesB1: Quote of the Day - 114 in a series of 365: "Love is not changed by death, And nothing is lost, And all in the end is harvest ..." - Dame Edith Sitwell

TheGoodbyeBaby: If one is a greyhound, why try to look like a Pekingese? — Dame Edith Sitwell

diddleymaz: Still Falls The Rain: Dame Edith Sitwell

ROCORinCardiff: Still Falls The Rain: Dame Edith Sitwell

nhowlz: Of a young Adrian Heath, Dame Edith Louise Sitwell once wrote, “Adrian is not eccentric. It's just that he is more alive than most people. He is an unpopular electric eel set in a pond of catfish.” Please read Martin’s unpublished yet masterful interview of the man called Inchy.

j9fingers: On the 100th anniversary of Walton's "Facade" I ponder; is Dame Edith Sitwell the first rapper?

Janedoeyo1: Dame Edith Sitwell on her appearance; 'I cant wear fashionable clothes. You see, i'm a throwback to remote ancestors of mine and I really would look so extraordinary if I wore coats and skirts. I would be followed for miles and people would doubt the existence of the almighty.'

AnecdotalWisdom: In 1954 poet Edith Sitwell was given the title Dame of the British Empire. On a visit to the United States an American came up to her and said rather aggressively, “Why do you call yourself ‘Dame’?” “I don’t,” she replied. “The queen does.”

noonessleep: A fun bit of esoteric trivia: when Marylin Monroe met with the poet Dame Edith Sitwell, they apparently spoke about Rudolf Steiner, to whose works the former had been introduced by her acting teacher Michael Chekhov, the nephew of Anton.

AnnDrogyne: The Amazing Dame Edith Sitwell which only England could have produced. A woman who took her extreme looks and emphasized them rather than try to hide them. Dame Edith Sitwell - Face to Face Interview 1959

Tranarchic: Always think it's a shame that Dame Edith Sitwell did not live long enough to see the birth of hip-hop.

MichaelLoris5: "I am not eccentric. It's just that I am more alive than most people. I am an unpopular electric eel set in a pond of catfish." ~ English writer and poetess, Dame Edith Sitwell (1887 - 1964)

AutographsColl2: DAME EDITH SITWELL - AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED

IDAC_TohokuUniv: "Winter is the time for comfort, for good food and warmth, for the touch of a friendly hand and for a talk beside the fire: it is the time for home." – Dame Edith Louisa Sitwell (a British poet and critic, and the eldest of the three literary Sitwells) Happy holidays everyone!

Dark4eyes: “I am patient with stupidity, but not with those who are proud of it.” ~Dame Edith Sitwell (1887-1964)

Circle_of_Days: “Winter is the time for comfort, for good food and warmth, for the touch of a friendly hand and for a talk beside the fire: it is the time for home.” —Dame Edith Sitwell.

ingo_don: — Dame Edith L. Sitwell (7/7/1887-9/12/1964) British poet, critic, oldest of the 3 literary Sitwells. She rejected her eccentric, loveless parents, for to live with her governess. She never married, but had a passionate relationship with Russian painter Pavel Tchelitchew. —

dylanthomasnews: Today we remember poet Dame Edith Sitwell, who died on this day, December 9, 1964 An influential and enthusiastic supporter of Dylan's poetry

AdamCurtisBot: But then a strange thing happened: Dame Edith Sitwell

treesbelle: Dame Edith Sitwell once said that winter is the time for comfort, for good food and warmth, for the touch of a friendly hand, and for a talk beside the fire. Yes, it is time for home.

MichaelLoris5: "I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it." ~ English poet and critic, Dame Edith Sitwell (1887 - 1964)

Elbies1: Check out this item in my Etsy shop

Knights_Auction: Dame Edith Sitwell address book smashes auction estimates The auction house says the 1804 Ottoman atlas was the first printed in the Islamic world:

QueeredR: The marvellous Dame Edith Sitwell, (1887-1964), the eldest of 3 literary Sitwells who reacted so negatively to her eccentric parents that she insisted that she was not at all eccentric. And, she was delightfully eccentric...one of the brilliantly vital English eccentrics...❤️

WhatSellsBest: Dame Edith Sitwell's address book sold at far beyond its estimated price of £200-300, fetching £52,500 ($70,500).

RevRichardColes: In the auction of Dame Edith Sitwell’s effects today from Weston Hall I note that her address book, estimated to go for £200-300, went for £42,000.

schellhornmusic: Manuscript of William Walton’s Façade, formerly belonging to Dame Edith Sitwell, on sale

Elbies1: Check out this item in myEtsy shop

girlwithout: Jewels and fashion items from the collection of the famous English poet and writer, Dame Edith Sitwell, of the esteemed literary Sitwell family, are to be offered in our auction 'Weston Hall and the Sitwells: A Family Legacy' on 16 & 17 November 2021.

Telegraph: ✍️ As Dame Edith Sitwell's eccentric wardrobe goes up for auction, her great nephew reflects fondly on a life less ordinary

BadSpit: Agatha Christie said she came up with many of her book plots while sitting in her bathtub eating apples. Dame Edith Sitwell chose to climb into an open coffin and lie down before she began writing.

alanigolanski: I am naturally in despair, as it is obvious that any small literary reputation I may possess could not possibly survive the disapproval of so eminent and famous a literary critic as Spencer Brown. By the way, who is he? -- Dame Edith Sitwell (1959)

leisarea: Dame Edith Sitwell - Face to Face Interview 1959

schellhornmusic: "I have been, in my life, very much influenced by the works of Mr Stravinsky." A wonderful interview of Dame Edith Sitwell here:

AutographsColl2: DAME EDITH SITWELL - AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED

showbiznotices: Sitwell family is set to auction contents of 17th-century Northamptonshire home Weston Hall - including writer Dame Edith's £12,000 oak four-poster bed and a love letter to Napoleon's younger sister

dean_frey: "I have a great feeling of gratitude. The Mirror published my first poem - in 1913 - when no other paper or publisher would have anything to do with my work." This goodwill towards her paper allowed Doreen Spooner to take this amazing shot of Dame Edith Sitwell, in 1962.

ejeancarroll: "I wouldn't dream of following fashion. How can you be a different person every three months?" Dame Edith Sitwell

ingo_don: Dame Edith L. Sitwell (7.07.1887-9.12.1964) Brit. poet, critic, oldest of the 3 literary Sitwells. She rejected her eccentric, loveless parents, preferred to live with her governess. She never married, but had a passionate relationship with the Russian painter Pavel Tchelitchew.



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Poem of the day

Emily Dickinson Poem
How much of Source escapes with thee'
 by Emily Dickinson

1517

How much of Source escapes with thee-
How chief thy sessions be-
For thou hast borne a universe
Entirely away.


...

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