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MelanieJaxn: And ere should wane the morning star, I'd don my robe and scimitar. And zebras seven should draw my car Through Tartary's dark glades. --Walter de la Mare

Richardprism: A Robin by Walter de la Mare Ghost-grey the fall of night, Ice-bound the lane, Lone in the dying light Flits he again; Lurking where shadows steal, Perched in his coat of blood, Man's homestead at his heel, Death-still the wood. In "The Living Bestiary"

Richardprism: The Snail By Walter de la Mare All day shut fast in whorled retreat You slumber where - no wild bird knows; While on your rounded roof-tree beat The petals of the rose. (Contd) In the Living Bestiary today - Look back at previous Tweets!

isidro_li: No voice is audible. The wind Sleeps in its peace. No flower of the light can find Refuge beneath its trees; Only the darkening ivy climbs Mingled with wilding rose, And cypress, morn and evening, time's Black shadow throws. — Walter de la Mare

poemtoday: Two poems by Walter de la Mare ...

benreadspoetry: Silver by Walter de la Mare

jonkay: (5) Michael Dirda on the early 20th-c psych-horror writing of Walter de la Mare ... a once-famous/mostly-forgotten author whose work you have read even if you don't realize you have read it

maryangeladougl: To the Russian Poets: I SAW THE GHOST OF WALTER DE LA MARE (FINAL VERSION)

AudieWood5: I’m in a very Walter de la Mare mood

IarkStu: ‘Devilish Agencies at Work’

war_poets: 9 March 1917 Edward Thomas writes to Walter de la Mare ‘It is all very different from the newspapers, and very much like what one would expect. Cold, dirt, fatigue, uncertainty, and the accidental beautiful or amusing thing.’

Roy_Noon: Nearly finished William Wootten's selection of poems by Walter de la Mare and it has been a wonderful experience, like being reunited with a childhood acquaintance

KnittingWyrd: And 7 poems: The Listeners - Walter De La Mare The Garden Of Love - William Blake The Second Coming - W.B Yeats Auguries Of Innocence - William Blake The Soldier - Rupert Brooke Sonnet 94 - William Shakespeare Dulce Et Decorum Est - Wilfred Owen

RaspiArduino: And the silence came surging softly backwards When the plunging hooves were gone... -- Walter de La Mare, "The Listeners"

isidro_li: All fordone and forgot; And like clouds in the height of the sky, Our hearts stood still in the hush Of an age gone by. — Walter de la Mare

nybooks: “As Walter de la Mare once wrote, ‘This workaday actuality of ours—with its bricks, its streets, its woods, its hills, its waters—may have queer and, possibly, terrifying holes in it.’” —Michael Dirda

nybooks: “As Dylan Thomas once commented, de la Mare’s fairies can be ‘as endearing as Dracula.’” —Michael Dirda on Walter de la Mare’s weird tales

jeannemarieM3: ‘Devilish Agencies at Work’

iswearenglish: The Rainbow Poem by Walter De La Mare - Summary Analysis - The Rainbow by Walter De La Mare 1873 – 1956

LarryBooks: ‘Devilish Agencies at Work’

typode: But they refuse to see how close to the edge of things we are: and how we are drifting. —Walter de la Mare, from "All Hallows"

isidro_li: Stones fall, brass cankers, mummy thins to dust, The voiceless grave stills frenzy, pride and lust; The very gods that mete out shame and fame, Save for the written word, were but a name. — Walter de la Mare

PoemAnalysis: ‘Silver’ by Walter de la Mare is a fourteen-line sonnet that follows a rhyming pattern of aabbccddeeffgg. Visit

chris_buchholz: Slowly, silently, now the moon Walks the night in her silver shoon; This way, and that, she peers, and sees Silver fruit upon silver trees; Walter de la Mare

telos32: BBC Radio 4 Extra - Walter de la Mare - Memoirs of a Midget, 1. Miss M

neosokwaliwa: "Wafts her on plumes like mist" - Walter De la Mare

Stella_Omega: I came across these two in about 6th grade, but "Obstinate Uncle Otis" by Robert Arthur was one of those, and the hallucinatory "Maria-Fly" by Walter De La Mare. you can read "Uncle Otis" here:

winterdamonbot: "Why are you named Winter?" "It’s a poem by Walter de la Mare," I tell him, but he’s probably not interested in hearing it. "My mom said the poem made a cold and bitter season seem pretty. You just have to look closer." He just stares out beyond the railing, looking thoughtful.

GRCollia: Book post! 'Bruin's Midnight Reader'. At 761 pages, a whopping house brick of a book! Contains tales by M. R. James, Walter de la Mare, Algernon Blackwood, etc. Also, the novel 'The Thing in the Woods' by Margery Williams (better know as the author of 'The Velveteen Rabbit').

DMcGachey: Currently reading: Robert Irwin's 'The Runes Have Been Cast', a satire of academia set in '60s Oxford & St Andrews, which threatens to turn into a ghost story, & frequently alludes to the classic ghost stories of M.R. James (no surprise given the title), Walter de la Mare, etc.

rmunro3: “The drowsy earth, craving the quiet of night, Turns her green shoulder from the sun’s last ray; Less than a moment in her solar flight Now seems, alas! thou fleeting one, life’s happiest day.” Days And Moments, Walter de la Mare

babscmelo: "- What's your tattoo? - A decaying snowflake. - Why? - Because of Winter by Walter de la Mare, he replied softly. Something still beautiful, even after what I did to her." isso aqui foi o motivo do meu colapso puta q pario

stannosimp: The Listeners - by Walter de la Mare

RuthArnold: And a poem for an abandoned house, one of the first to capture my imagination and why it is so good to read poetry out loud to children. A teacher read Walter de la Mare to us so it was the first poetry anthology I borrowed from the library. Hooked.

vw_lowell: I wonder if I sh'ld continue w/ Walter de la Mare's poetry or re-start Solitary: Unbroken by Four Decades in Solitary Confinement by Albert Woodfox?

AmateurReader: ... The Invention of Morel (1940), Adolfo Bioy Casares Cannery Row (1946), John Steinbeck The Iceman Cometh (1946), Eugene O’Neill Kilometer 101 (2007-21), Maxim Osipov POETRY The Burning-Glass and Other Poems (1945), Walter de la Mare

DF_Lewis: The great now woke novel by Walter de la Mare

winterdamonbot: "Why are you named Winter?" "It’s a poem by Walter de la Mare," I tell him, but he’s probably not interested in hearing it. "My mom said the poem made a cold and bitter season seem pretty. You just have to look closer." He just stares out beyond the railing, looking thoughtful.

DF_Lewis: “Shouldn’t life be a High Road, didn’t he think; surely not a hot, silly zigzag of short cuts leading back to the place you started from, and you too old or stupid, perhaps, to begin again?” — Walter de la Mare (Memoirs of a Midget)

NlKOVA: “What’s your tattoo?” “A decaying snowflake.” “Why?” “Because of Winter by Walter de la Mare. Something still beautiful, even after what I did to her.” crying and throwing up i love winter and damon

POETSorg: One last candle burning low, All the sleepy dancers gone, Just one candle burning on, Shadows lurking everywhere: Some one came, and kissed me there. —Walter de la Mare

stehr12ywygx: Reading Walter de la Mare B9KIM8X

wikeleyjb: "Changeling and solitary, Secret and sharp and small..." Walter de la Mare's robin.

DF_Lewis: The Art of Writing… “Well, there is only one recipe I have ever heard of: take a quart or more of life-blood; mix it with a bottle of ink, and a teaspoonful of tears; and ask God to forgive the blots.” — Walter de la Mare (Memoirs of a Midget)

DF_Lewis: “Do you ever find a word suddenly so crammed with meaning that at any moment it threatens to explode?” — Walter de la Mare

welfordwrites: The Children of Stare, a poem by Walter de la Mare. This poem has an air of mystery and something sinister about it. Click the link!

roberts92iaw: AmblesideOnline Poetry Anthology Volume Two: Walter de la Mare, Eugene Field, James Whitcomb Riley, Christina Rossetti YP6LOCK

EBloodaxe19: The Snowflake Before I melt Come look at me! This lovely icy filigree! Of a great forest In one night I make a wilderness Of white: By Skyey cold Of crystals made, All safely, on You finger laid, My beauty see: Breathe, and I vanish Instantly. Walter de la Mare 1873 ~ 1956

EBloodaxe19: The Raven's Tomb 'Build me my tomb,' the Raven said 'Within the dark yew-tree, So in the Autumn yewberries, Sad lamps, may burn for me Summon the haunted beetle, From twilight bud and bloom, To drone a gloomy dirge for me At dusk above my tomb.' Walter de la Mare

j_ismay_graham: Slowly silently, now the moon. Walks the night in her silver shoon; This way and that, she peers, and sees. Silver fruit upon silver trees. -Walter de la Mare

winterdamonbot: "What's your tattoo?" "A decaying snowflake." "Why?" "Because of Winter by Walter de la Mare," he replied softly. "Something still beautiful, even after what I did to her."

Spill_Words: The Listeners a poem by: Walter de la Mare   "Is there anybody there?" said the Traveller, Knocking on the moonlit door; And his horse in the silence champed the grass Of the forest's ferny floor; And a bird flew up

winterdamonbot: "What's your tattoo?" "A decaying snowflake." "Why?" "Because of Winter by Walter de la Mare," he replied softly. "Something still beautiful, even after what I did to her."

twelvetreesbook: Just in! Come Hither A Collection of Rhymes and Poems for the Young of All Ages Made by Walter de la Mare

TimothyFerg1: All Hallows by Walter de la Mare

wmrlibrary: Storytime: December 7th 2022 Paige reads Bears in the Snow by Shirley Parenteau and Snow by Walter de la Mare ❄️ ⛄️ ❄️

BurlHorniachek: Christmas Eve by Walter de La Mare

StMaggieP: 3rd: Clouded with snow the cold winds blow, And shrill on leafless bough The robin with its burning breast Alone sings now. From a poem by Walter de la Mare

DF_Lewis: “But to return to Christmas, a gluttonous festival intended to celebrate a distressing episode in an abject little eastern province which proved nothing but a pest even to the Romans, now nearly two thousand years ago!” —- Walter de la Mare (‘A Sort of Interview)

DF_Lewis: My reviews of Walter de la Mare stories in alphabetical order…

EvelynMaddoks: Snowdrops figure prominently in art and literature, often as a symbol in poetry of spring, purity, and religion, such as Walter de la Mare's poem The Snowdrop (1929). In this poem, he likened the triple tepals in each whorl to the Holy Trinity

MonardaB: I am a bit ambivalent about giving away the secret. Excerpt: Too few people now read Walter de la Mare’s subtle, sui generis masterpiece, “Memoirs of a Midget.”

zayamensch: What is the world, O soldiers?        It is I: I, this incessant snow,    This northern sky; Soldiers, this solitude    Through which we go        Is I. ("Napoleon" by Walter de la Mare)

MelanieJaxn: All day long the door of the sub-conscious remains just ajar; we slip through to the other side, and return again, as easily and secretly as a cat. Walter de La Mare

jcwilsonauthor: Theresa Whistler, THE LIFE OF WALTER DE LA MARE

DanRattelle: Just about anything by Walter de la Mare.

IainMoppett: ... Is there anybody there?’ said the Traveller, Knocking on the moonlit door. The Listeners, Walter de la Mare...

NinaAntonia13: 'When twilight's falling softly On the little green orchard; When the grey dew distils & every flower-cup fills; When the last blackbird says, 'What-what!' & goes her way - ssh! I have heard voices calling softly In the little green orchard' - Walter De La Mare.

larrymeath: The Listeners by Walter de La Mare | Poetry Foundation

Joy_Silence: In fact I think that along with Sarban and Walter de la Mare, Brooke might be my actual favourite stylist.

DanielCowper: Ladies and Gentlemen, Walter de la Mare would like to tell to you your secret hearts:

mag400: Check out Early One Morning Walter De La Mare FIRST EDITION 1935 Faber & Faber London

jaguarjin: Bonne soirée Nought warm where your hand was, Nought gold where your hair was, But phantom, forlorn, Beneath the thorn, Your ghost where your face was … (Walter de la Mare, Autumn (November)

LissadellHouse: There is a wind where the rose was, Cold rain where sweet grass was, And clouds like sheep Stream o'er the steep Grey skies where the lark was. Walter de la Mare November

DF_Lewis: “What are we all but ghosts – of something?” — Walter de la Mare (Pretty Poll)

EuxtonCEPrimary: Year 5 are recording video performances of Walter de la Mare’s ‘The Listeners’.

MarieDeRoy1: Look thy last on all things lovely, Every hour. Let no night Seal thy sense in deathly slumber Till to delight Thou have paid thy utmost blessing; Since that all things thou wouldst praise Beauty took from those who loved them In other days. Walter de la Mare

gnilwoce: Is there anybody there?’ said the Traveller, Knocking on the moonlit door; And his horse in the silence champed the grasses Of the forest’s ferny floor: - Walter de la Mare

DF_Lewis: Ambrose Manning!! Just realised! Cf Arthur Lawford in WDLM’s ‘The Return’ (

MelanieJaxn: A harvest mouse goes scampering by, With silver claws, and silver eye; And moveless fish in the water gleam, By silver reeds in a silver stream. --Walter de la Mare

DeeringRachel: Autumn, November ~ Walter de la Mare. ‘There is a wind where the rose was, Cold rain where sweet grass was, And clouds like sheep Stream o'er the steep Grey skies where the lark was. Nought warm where your hand was, Nought gold where your hair was… 1/2

skydog811: The Listeners by Walter de la Mare - Poems

ChezDolan: The Listeners - by Walter de la Mare - YouTube

WilliamWootten: For Halloween, an poem and a snippet of commentary on witch hates from Reading Walter de la Mare

DonallGeoghegan: The Listeners Walter de la Mare

winterdamonbot: "What's your tattoo?" "A decaying snowflake." "Why?" "Because of Winter by Walter de la Mare," he replied softly. "Something still beautiful, even after what I did to her."

DF_Lewis: IN THE FOREST by Walter de la Mare This seems, fortuitously and quite by chance (!), to be the natural counterpart to the previous story THE BOWL above that I read and reviewed yesterday. My review…

GregMLeadbetter: Very glad to have this fine volume in my hands, revisiting the work of Walter de la Mare, and to have a poem among the excellent company here:

nemoloris: Homage to Walter de la Mare. Light dusting of James Clarence Mangan at the end too I see now.

melannechthon: THE BIRD OF TRAVEL by Walter de la Mare

DF_Lewis: Good job I have written about it straightaway, as it would have faded, otherwise. But was I soon *enough* to get it written down properly about what I remembered feeling when reading this? —

MelanieJaxn: 'That sotto voce cons the song He'll sing when dark is spread; And Night's vague hours are sweet and long, And we are laid abed.' -Walter de la Mare

andrewdoyle_com: I’ve written an essay on the poet Walter de la Mare for this new critical anthology. It’s an expensive book, but there are some great essays here on this much neglected writer!

A__Runner: Slowly, silently, now the moon Walks the night in her silver shoon; This way, and that, she peers, and sees Silver fruit upon silver trees; One by one the casements catch Her beams beneath the silvery thatch; ~Walter de la Mare.

englishunicam: News: Prof Angela Leighton, Dr Anna Nickerson, and Dr Yui Kajita publish ‘Walter de la Mare: Critical Appraisals’ (Liverpool University Press, 2022)

NGIreland: This one is based on Harry Clarke's beautifully intricate stained glass work, The Song of the Mad Prince, which was itself inspired by the poem by Walter de la Mare. It comes in a bespoke gift box with a quote from the poem.

isidro_li: The transient strangeness of the earth Their spirits no more see: Within a silent gloom withdrawn, They slumber in secrecy. Two worlds they have — a globe forgot, Wheeling from dark to light; And all the enchanted realm of dream That burgeons out of night. — Walter de la Mare

ArohiNilkanthe: Walter de la mare was an english poet, short-story writer and novelist. He is best remembered for his poems for children

robertsnickc: Why? Ever, ever Stir and shiver The reeds and rushes By the river: Ever, ever, As if in dream, The lone moon's silver Sleeks the stream. What old sorrow, What lost love, Moon, reeds, rushes, Dream you of? ~ Walter de la Mare, 1873-1956

IHSEnglish: Mrs Vickers' favourite poem is, 'The Listeners' by Walter de la Mare.



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