Comments about Sir Walter Scott

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YIMLifestyle: Success or failure in business is caused more by the mental attitude even than by mental capacities. (Sir Walter Scott)

MukherjiSujoy: Success or failure in business is caused more by the mental attitude even than by mental capacities. (Sir Walter Scott)

STORI3D_PAST: In "Ivanhoe," Sir Walter Scott remembers something that's been forgotten by many today: a *lot* of people in Saxon & early Norman England were slaves. Not serfs, slaves. Owned, traded, property. (Domesday Book records that a full 10% of England's population was owned by others.)

1800sOzPublican: Publican John Perrell Wilshire, of the Sir Walter Scott, Mongarlow River, District of Braidwood - 1841

jlorts: "O what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive." --Sir Walter Scott

mflibra: 1830 First Edition of Letters on Demonology & Witchcraft - WITCHES & FAIRIES by Sir Walter Scott.

mflibra: 1830 First Edition of Letters on Demonology & Witchcraft - WITCHES & FAIRIES by Sir Walter Scott.

panicstlawyer: Today's author, quoted by another: Sir Walter Scott

RichardCRogers: Another cool history/adventure/romance novel from Sir Walter Scott. My brief thoughts here:

MrsCommodore: Alas, The Invention Age is past us--like the Scottish riptide that brought us Sir Walter Scott, we Americans are living in a ghetto of intellectual brightness, being filled with laughable marketing projects. The tide will turn, as it always does.

NoMoeTrouble: “Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive!" - (Sir Walter Scott, 1808)

AmITooRemoved: The Octopus -> Melmoth the Wanderer -> The Correspondence of Sir Walter Scott and Charles Robert Maturin -> Detransition, Baby Also in there somewhere I read the introduction to Picture of Dorian Gray

RalphDaniel2: “Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive” - Sir Walter Scott.

Edinburgh4u: The Sir Walter Scott Monument climb the steps for great views over Edinburgh at,

iCuckooClock: O, what a tangled web we weave, When first we practice to deceive. -- Sir Walter Scott, "Marmion"

wma6_p: You might remember it , Sir Walter Scott oh by the way, the Norman format or Normandy format was Ukrainian Belarus France in Germany I'm just still wondering why the United States is running it's country on my passport? And the Ukrainian gas company Leonardo Tower

wma6_p: In Kiev Ukraine I'm sure it has nothing to do with some forger possibly k r i s s Leonardo Montenegro , they really hated Sir Walter Scott or William Scott or Duke William that much? Isn't that English? Why am I still without funds in the United States and just European ?

wma6_p: And honorable ! Nation and capital DC that makes the states at time's seem to be the blame for everything , 1860 Sir Walter Scott ! And his funds in the in the bank in Michigan! United States capital! Has done everything including calling some of my family isil,

Page_Upon_Page: The works of Sir Walter Scott. 43 : Count Robert of Paris, and, The surgeon's daughter ; 1 (Published: 1913) Full text:

RaviBatra: Warrant for Giuliani's phones, computers seeks communications with over a dozen people

LGauffreau: Season 3 Episode 16: Joan Dunnett on Reading Sir Walter Scott

STORI3D_PAST: Sir Walter Scott pointing out that in Norman times, animals retained their Saxon names (swine, ox, calf) while alive & needing tending but took on Norman terms (pork, beef, veau) when slaughtered and served as delicacies to their Norman overlords.

ElinorHS: Not a classic film, but I will always remember Judy Davis in “Where Angels Fear to Tread” standing up after a performance of “Lucia di Lammamoor” in Italy, screaming “This is NOT Sir Walter Scott!

the_silly_point: "A lawyer without history or literature is a mechanic, a mere working mason, if he possesses some knowledge of these, he may venture to call himself an architect." - Sir Walter Scott

iCuckooClock: O, what a tangled web we weave, When first we practice to deceive. -- Sir Walter Scott, "Marmion"

LloydAllison12: "Oh what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive." Sir Walter Scott

RaspiArduino: O, what a tangled web we weave, When first we practice to deceive. -- Sir Walter Scott, "Marmion"

JaffRutherford: Sandyknowe Farm, once owned by Sir Walter Scott's grandfather

lolan_t: "Oh what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive..." - Sir Walter Scott "Stay open minded.Things aren't always what they seem to be." - Lolan T. Royal

R_McCormack: We were in the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and got to the bit with a load of Bonny Highland Scenes, tartan wine glasses and a bust of Sir Walter Scott and after staring at them all for wee while he turns to me with a look that is obviously disgust even with a big black mask on

detroit_hub: All men who have turned out worth anything have had the chief hand in their education. – Sir Walter Scott

Artistwithwords: To the timid and hesitating everything is impossible because it seems so. Sir Walter Scott

debc03417614: "Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive!" (Sir Walter Scott, 1808)

GoGlen2Glen: For anyone looking to discover more about Sir Walter Scott in the year we celebrate his 250th anniversary, take a look at this new online course. It's free! And it focuses on many aspects of his remarkable life, not just that of a writer.

Damian_Barr: I’ve been planning this for years! Excited to share my adventures with Scott-from the deepest Borders country to the top of his monument.

StevesQuotes: He that climbs the tall tree has won the right to the fruit Sir Walter Scott

CambusnethanP: My long term interest in Sir Walter Scott led me to discover all the links between Scottish Romanticism and Lanarkshire heritage. Scott's son-in-law and fellow author J.G. Lockhart was born at the Cambusnethan Manse, near the Priory.

TipMahoney: 'Oh what a tangled web we weave/When first we practice to deceive." -- from Sir Walter Scott's "Marmion: A Tale of Flodden Field." This verse sprang to mind after reading the NY Times report on the scheme by Cuomo administration to shield nursing home data from the public.

RaspiArduino: O, what a tangled web we weave, When first we practice to deceive. -- Sir Walter Scott, "Marmion"

KristynJMiller: And the earliest written evidence of its use was by Sir Walter Scott!

edinburgh_music: New article on Edinburgh Music Review - Heart of Midlothian: A singer salutes Sir Walter Scott

IVMiles: To a point; Anglo-Saxon was also a synonym for representative political institutions. Americans in the 19th read Sir Walter Scott who regularly pitted constitutionalist "Anglo-Saxons" against oligarchical or autocratic "Normans." An unhelpful term but its use was wide and varied.

masada2118: palazzo at Verona, a thundering battlefield in France, or the chilling Tower of London by reciting acts from Shakespeare’s plays until the little one’s had memorized the lines enough that they could join in, too. Marx also read the children Dante, Cervantes, Sir Walter Scott,

JaffRutherford: Thomas left the house to his sister Jean who had married Thomas Scott, Sir Walter Scott's uncle. source: "Rutherfords in Britain", p. 110

WhiskyPics: A marble bust of Sir Walter Scott in the library of his former home at Abbotsford in the Scottish Borders.

menzikulati: " Teach self-denial and make its practice pleasure, and you can create for the world a destiny more sublime that ever issued from the brain of the wildest dreamer." |  Sir Walter Scott

peterbrownbarra: “Originally there were three stations built in the 1840s to serve the city. ... From 1854 these three stations were collectively known as 'Waverley', named after the Sir Walter Scott Waverley Novels.”

AS_Corpus: Next: a splendid red sandstone cross-slab from Woodwray (Angus). Found around 1819 in floor of kitchen when foundations of the old castle at Woodrae (alt. spelling) were cleared. The estate factor had it sent to his friend, Sir Walter Scott, at Abbotsford.

met_photos: Hill and Adamson, William Borthwick Johnstone, William Leighton Leitch and David Scott as "The Monks of Kennaquhair" from Sir Walter Scott's "The Abbott", 1843–47

HoodKaKau: “Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when we first practice to deceive." Sir Walter Scott

Julija9Julija: The Scott Monument - a Victorian Gothic monument to Scottish author Sir Walter Scott, a famous freemason. It is the second largest monument to a writer in the world after the José Martí monument in Havana.

ScottishStudies: There are still a couple of days left to register for our final virtual seminar of the semester! Join us on Tuesday, 27 April as Amy Beingessner discusses how Sir Walter Scott's works have influenced perceptions of Scottish history!

WakeBetween: I don’t want to ride the wave I want the drifting canoe and Sir Walter Scott a great dwindling quiet peace and a sweet nostalgia

jamesmeredithd1: We shall never learn to feel and respect our real calling and destiny, unless we have taught ourselves to consider every thing as moonshine, compared with the education of the heart. Sir Walter Scott

IHasWisdom: O, what a tangled web we weave, When first we practice to deceive. -- Sir Walter Scott, "Marmion"

HubrisTheBook: Raising debt on the strength of fake invoices is not new. Adam Smith called it out in 1776 and it brought down Sir Walter Scott in 1826. It’s all in my book, The Rise and Fall of the City of Money

iCuckooClock: O, what a tangled web we weave, When first we practice to deceive. -- Sir Walter Scott, "Marmion"

RaspiArduino: O, what a tangled web we weave, When first we practice to deceive. -- Sir Walter Scott, "Marmion"

LiveLawIndia: J. Bobde quotes Sir Walter Scott "A lawyer without history or literature is a mechanic, a mere working mason; if he possesses some knowledge of these, he may venture to call himself an architect."

SujoyMukherji: Success or failure in business is caused more by the mental attitude even than by mental capacities. (Sir Walter Scott)

NortherlyRose: Ultimately so much comes down to trust. It’s a double truthfulness problem. I don’t trust someone because they don’t tell the truth, and they don’t trust me because I do. As Sir Walter Scott wrote: ‘Oh what a tangled web we weave, When first we practise to deceive.’ 27/

shopfacade: Former Sir Walter Scott Pub, 2 Broadway Market - now a café/restaurant.

BKalkis: Poems tell entertaining stories: "Paul Revere's Ride", HW Longfellow; "Hold Fast to Dreams", Langston Hughes; "Foul Shot", Edwin Hoey; "Lochinvar", Sir Walter Scott; "George. Who played with a Dangerous toy & Suffered a Catastrophe of Considerable Dimensions", Hilaire Belloc.

ohiostreetjoe: "Oh what a tangled web we weave when we practice to deceive." ..Sir Walter Scott - the play Marmion

Grouse_Beater: Abbotsford, home of Sir Walter Scott, now undergoing preparations for the house’s re-opening. Photo: Murdo MacLeod

bimbosalami: “Oh, what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive.” ~ Sir Walter Scott, 1808 I thought of this quote when reading the story of David and Bathsheba(2 Samuel 11).One unconfessed lie always leads to a worse lie,and one unconfessed sin always leads to a worse sin. 1/

MukherjiSujoy: Success or failure in business is caused more by the mental attitude even than by mental capacities. (Sir Walter Scott)

YIMLifestyle: Success or failure in business is caused more by the mental attitude even than by mental capacities. (Sir Walter Scott)

AuralAudiobook: The Lay of the Last Minstrel by Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832) | Full Audiobook

IrenSayWhen: in Sir Walter Scott's novel, Ivanhoe, where a feudal lord refers to the paid army he's assembled: I offered Richard the service of my Free Lances, and he refused them

LukeSticks: “Oh, what a tangled web we weave, When first we practice to deceive!” -Sir Walter Scott,1808

SOPAuckland: We shall never learn to feel and respect our own calling and destiny, until we have taught ourselves to consider everything as moonshine, compared with the education of the heart. Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) British novelist, poet

antiquebooksden: The Poetical Works of Sir Walter Scott by Sir Walter Scott

60sTVFan: Ivanhoe ⚔️ Great Sunday tea-time viewing in 1970 on BBC 1 Remember Eric Flynn as the hero of Sir Walter Scott's 1819 novel?

AbdulsatarBoch1: Melrose, Scotland Claudia Bolling, house and collections officer at Abbotsford, the home of Sir Walter Scott, prepares for the house’s re-opening next week Photograph: Murdo MacLeod/The Guardian

TheMedievalDrK: Def straight through the 18thc though, yes? Sir Walter Scott doesn't use it in 1817, but he was writing for an English audience...

Edinburgh4u: Abbotsford House home of Sir Walter Scott on the south of Edinburgh Click on Map on

toriano_sanzone: The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is the only breed named for a fictional person—a character in the novel Guy Mannering, by Sir Walter Scott. Learn more about Dogs

palaeokatie: Easdale slate from Argyll carved with the Sir Walter Scott quote - “When we had a king, and a chancellor, and parliament- men o’ our ain, we could aye peeble them wi’ stanes when they werena gude bairns - But naebody’s nails can reach the length o’ Lunnon”.

denegrj: “O, what a tangled web we weave, When first we practise to deceive!” - Sir Walter Scott (1808) Marmion: A Tale of Flodden Field.

BKahatjipara: "Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive!" (Sir Walter Scott, 1808) This is how George Floyd's murder was initially reported.

AndrewA01636120: Wbro Sir Walter Scott

bakeandwrite: Season 3 Episode 16: Joan Dunnett on Reading Sir Walter Scott

pony_strategies: Rationalists who pin their faith on Sir Walter Scott and

UTheos: April 18, 2021 Weekly Theme for Contemplation: Rama Avatar His ready speech flow’d fair and free, In phrase of gentlest courtesy. — SIR WALTER SCOTT Follow the wheel of life; follow the wheel of duty to race and kin, to friend and foe, and close thy mind to pleasures as to …

UTheos: April 18, 2021 Weekly Theme for Contemplation: Rama Avatar His ready speech flow’d fair and free, In phrase of gentlest courtesy. — SIR WALTER SCOTT Follow the wheel of life; follow the wheel of duty to race and kin, to friend and foe, and close thy mind to pleasures as to …

STORI3D_PAST: At the close of "Waverley," Sir Walter Scott celebrates & laments the passing of Scottish Highland Clan culture into memory & then legend over the course of a lifetime, from Culloden to the turn of the 19th C. It could as easily have been Tolkien's paean to the end of an age.

coaimpaul: As the clamour grows for an inquiry into Boris Johnson’s ‘failure to be honest’ (lying), I’ll leave the last word today to Sir Walter Scott: O, what a tangled web we weave; When first we practice to deceive!

ChasingArt: Season 3 Episode 16: Joan Dunnett on Reading Sir Walter Scott

ZachariasConn: "In 1816, Sir Walter Scott reviewed his own, but anonymously published, Tales of My Landlord, partly to deflect suspicion that he was the author; he proved one of the book's harshest critics."

ham_prints: John Burnet, Sir Walter Scott in His Study at Abbotsford, 19th century

RyanMcCubbinTX: "Whet the bright steel, Sons of the White Dragon, kindle the torch, Daughter of Hengist!" - Sir Walter Scott

gasnerpants: (Sir Walter Scott)

harvard_art_bot: Sir Walter Scott, Bart - (19th century) John Horsburgh | Engraving | R5073

STORI3D_PAST: So much of Tolkien shows up in Sir Walter Scott's "Waverley," published 140 years earlier. Treebeard's outburst, "Curse him, root and branch," is just the latest I've found.

STORI3D_PAST: And yet another common Tolkienism found in Sir Walter Scott. "Manning" meaning "composing oneself." Tolkien often talked of a valiant character being "unmanned" -- losing his composure, wits. In Tolkien as in Sir Walter, being unmanned is a grave loss of dignity.

SyneDrum: Finally able to travel beyond Glasgow and enjoy a trip to Loch Katrine, with woodpeckers hammering and Sir Walter Scott's words echoing all around: "The dewy ground was dark and cold; Behind, all gloomy to behold; And stepping westward seemed to be; A kind of heavenly destiny"

kgdwoc: 'Love rules the court, he camp, the grove, and men below and saints above; for love is heaven, and heaven is love.' - Sir Walter Scott.

NW_Horadam: Okay on a serious Anglo-Saxon note, Sir Walter Scott's "Ivanhoe," which centers on semi-fictitious hostilities between Normans and (Anglo-)Saxons during the reign (or specifically, foreign imprisonment) of Richard I, remains one of the all-time works of historical fiction.

IHasWisdom: O, what a tangled web we weave, When first we practice to deceive. -- Sir Walter Scott, "Marmion"



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Comus
 by John Milton

A Masque Presented At Ludlow Castle, 1634, Before

The Earl Of Bridgewater, Then President Of Wales.

The Persons

The ATTENDANT SPIRIT, afterwards in the habit of THYRSIS.
COMUS, with his Crew.
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