Samuel Taylor Coleridge Quotes

Language is the armory of the human mind, and at once contains the trophies of its past and the weapons of its future conquests.

Works of imagination should be written in very plain language the more purely imaginative they are the more necessary it is to be plain.

What comes from the heart goes to the heart.

There are three classes into which all the women past seventy that ever I knew were to be divided 1.That dear old soul2. That old woman3. That old witch.

Works of imagination should be written in very plain language; the more purely imaginative they are the more necessary it is to be plain.

The wise only possess ideas the greater part of mankind are possessed by them.

The most happy marriage I can imagine to myself would be the union of a deaf man to a blind woman.

The happiness of life is made up of minute fractions - the little, soon forgotten charities of a kiss or a smile, a kind look or heartfelt compliment.

Talent, lying in the understanding, is often inherited; genius, being the action of reason or imagination, rarely or never.

Talent, lying in the understanding, is often inherited genius, being the action of reason or imagination, rarely or never.

What if you slept? And what if, in your sleep, you dreamed? And what if, in your dream, you went to heaven and plucked a strange and beautiful flower? And what if, when you awoke, you had the flower in your hand? Ah, what then?

Poetry is certainly something more than good sense, but it must be good sense at all events just as a palace is more than a house, but it must be a house, at least.

Our quaint metaphysical opinions, in an hour of anguish, are like playthings by the bedside of a child deathly sick.

There is one art of which man should be master, the art of reflection.

No Voice; but oh! the silence sank like music on my heart.

No mind is thoroughly well organized that is deficient in a sense of humor.

If you would stand well with a great mind, leave him with a favorable impression of yourself; if with a little mind, leave him with a favorable impression of himself.

If you would stand well with a great mind, leave him with a favorable impression of yourself if with a little mind, leave him with a favorable impression of himself.

I wish our clever young poets would remember my homely definitions of prose and poetry that is prose words in their best order-poetry the best words in the best order.

I have seen gross intolerance shown in support of toleration.

I have seen gross intolerance shown in support of tolerance.

He who begins by loving Christianity better than truth will proceed by loving his own sect or church better than Christianity, and end in loving himself better than all.

He saw a lawyer killing a viper On a dunghill hard, by his own stable And the devil smiled, for it put him in mind Of Cain and his brother, Abel.

He prayeth best who loveth best All things both great and small For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all.

Friendship is like a sheltering tree.

Exclusively of the abstract sciences, the largest and worthiest portion of our knowledge consists of aphorisms and the greatest and best of men is but an aphorism.

There is no such thing as a worthless book though there are some far worse than worthless; no book that is not worth preserving, if its existence may be tolerated; as there may be some men whom it may be proper to hang, but none should be suffered to starve.

Common sense in an uncommon degree and is what the world calls wisdom.

What is an epigram A dwarfish whole, its body brevity, and wit its soul.

All thoughts, all passions, all delights Whatever stirs this mortal frame All are but ministers of Love And feed His sacred flame.



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Lycidas
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In this Monody the author bewails a learned Friend, unfortunately
drowned in his passage from Chester on the Irish Seas, 1637;
and, by occasion, foretells the ruin of our corrupted Clergy,
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